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Daily Kos: Senate Bill 4 Regs Will Expand Fracking in CA.

Daily Kos: Senate Bill 4 Regs Will Expand Fracking in CA. | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Anti-fracking, environmental and watchdog groups responded on July 1 to the release of final fracking regulations developed under Senate Bill 4, pointing out that the rules promote the expansion of fracking in California.


Senate Bill 4, the green light for fracking bill, was signed by Governor Jerry Brown on September 20, 2013. The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), the California League of Conservation Voters, the Environmental Defense Fund and other corporate "environmental" NGOs provided green cover for the odious legislation. They backed the bill until the very last minute when they finally decided to withdraw support because of amendments from the Western States Petroleum Association and other Big Oil interests that further weakened the already weak legislation. [via @dailykos]

...

"In California, drilling happens in overburdened communities that already suffer from the worst air pollution, have the highest levels of childhood asthma, and generally have the greatest health disparities in the state,” said Barbara Sattler, a board member at the Alliance of Nurses for Healthy Environments and professor at the University of San Francisco. “That regulators would finalize regulations and release a final environmental review before the completion of an independent scientific assessment is simply unacceptable.”


University of San Francisco's insight:

Barbara Sattler, RN, DrPH, FAAN

Education

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, Public Health 1990 School of Public Health Oc/Env Health
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, Public Health 1982 School of Hygiene and Public Health
University of Baltimore, MD, Political Science 1980
Pilgrim State Hosp School of Nursing, Nursing 1975

Publications
BOOKS AND BOOK CHAPTERS
  • Sattler, B. (2013). Environmental Health Chapter. In AAOHN edited edition: Core Curriculum for Occupational and Environmental Health Nursing. (3rd ed.)
  • Sattler, B. (2011, April). The greening of a major medical center. American Journal of Nursing, 111(4):60-2. DOI:10.1097/01.NAJ.0000396559.09620.94
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American Academy of Nursing Announces 2015 Class of New Fellows

American Academy of Nursing Announces 2015 Class of New Fellows | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The American Academy of Nursing has selected 163 nurse leaders to be inducted as Academy fellows. The induction ceremony will take place during the Academy’s annual policy conference, Transforming Health, Driving Policy, on October 17th, 2015, in Washington, D.C.


The Academy is currently comprised of more than 2,300 nurse leaders in education, management, practice, policy and research. Academy fellows include hospital and government administrators, college deans and renowned scientific researchers.


Fellow selection criteria include evidence of significant contributions to nursing and health care, and sponsorship by two current Academy fellows. Applicants are reviewed by a panel comprised of elected and appointed fellows, and selection is based, in part, on the extent the nominee’s nursing career has influenced health policies and the health and wellbeing of all. New fellows will be eligible to use the FAAN credential (fellow of the American Academy of Nursing) after the induction ceremony takes place in October. [via @AAN_Nursing]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Judith F. Karshmer, PhD, PMHCNS-BC

School of Nursing Dean Dr. Judith Karshmer, PhD, PMHCNS-BS, holds several offices within health organizations throughout the Bay Area and nation. You probably are most familiar with her role as the Dean of the School of Nursing & Health Professions. During her six years here at USF, she has expanded the majors offered at both the Undergraduate and Graduate levels that include, but are not limited to, the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) with tracks in the Family Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, and Executive Health Care Systems Leadership or new programs such as the Master of Science in Healthcare Simulation or Health Informatics. With the expanded degree offerings and growth of our School, Dean Karshmer continually seeks to strengthen the relationship of USF School of Nursing & Health Professions with the Bay Area. Recently, Dean Karshmer was appointed as a Health Commissioner to the San Francisco Health Commission, by Mayor Ed Lee; further expanding her impact and work within the city.


KT Waxman, DNP, MBA, RN, CNL, CENP, CHSEDr.

KT Waxman is a nurse leader with over 25 years of experience in health care and corporate settings. She is President and CEO of Waxman and Associates and currently the program director for the Bay Area Simulation Collaborative (BASC) and the California Simulation Alliance (CSA) at the California Institute for Nursing & Health Care (CINHC). As a full-time Assistant Professor at the University of San Francisco, she coordinates and teaches in the Executive Leader Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program. An internationally known speaker and author, Waxman is also a past president of the Association of California Nurse Leaders (ACNL) and active with the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) serving on its International Committee. She is currently serving as Chair of the Membership Committee for the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSIH).

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Washington Post: Do we know how to hold teacher preparation programs accountable?

Washington Post: Do we know how to hold teacher preparation programs accountable? | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The U.S. Education Department late last year released a draft set of regulations for colleges of education in what officials say is an effort to ensure that teachers are prepared to do their jobs well. But the draft regulations are controversial with educators and researchers who have written letters repeatedly to Education Secretary Arne Duncan with objections. One review of the proposed regulations, released by the National Education Policy Center at the University of Colorado Boulder and authored by Kevin Kumashiro, dean of the University of San Francisco School of Education, cites concerns including “an underestimation of what could be a quite high and unnecessary cost and burden,” “an unfounded attribution of educational inequities to individual teachers rather than to root systemic causes,”  and  “a reliance on scientifically discredited processes of test-based accountability and value-added measures for data analysis.” [via @washingtonpost]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Kevin Kumashiro is Dean and Professor of the School of Education at the University of San Francisco. He is a leading expert on educational policy, school reform, teacher preparation, and educational equity and social justice, with a wide-ranging list of accomplishments nationally and internationally as a scholar, educator, leader, and advocate. He has taught in schools and colleges across the United States and abroad and has served as a consultant for school districts, organizations, and state and federal agencies.


Dr. Kumashiro came to the University of San Francisco from the University of illinois at Chicago (UIC), where he served as professor and coordinator of Asian American Studies, Chair of the Department of Educational Policy Studies, and Interim Co-Director of the Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy. He was also the primary investigator and project director of the UIC AANAPISI (Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institution) Initiative, which was funded by over $4 million from the U.S. Department of Education to support the recruitment, retention, and academic success of Asian American, Pacific Islander, and English-language learner students in higher education.

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Center for Investigative Reporting - Reveal: 7 solutions that could help stop rape on the night shift

Center for Investigative Reporting - Reveal: 7 solutions that could help stop rape on the night shift | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The night shift janitor is an easy target. Working in isolation, cleaners across the country say they have been harassed, assaulted and raped by supervisors and co-workers while tidying office buildings, shopping malls and universities, as our investigation exposed.
 

It’s an ugly phenomenon. But there are ways to tackle it. Some of them are simple, and some already are being tested. [via @Reveal @CIRonline]

...

Today, as the founder and CEO of an organization called Sexual Health Innovations, she has developed a website for universities called Callistothat walks a victim through all of the steps for reporting a sexual assault or rape.


The system timestamps the victim’s anonymous and confidential online record, which could be helpful later if the victim decides to pursue a legal case. So someone who has been assaulted can document the incident right away, timestamp it and save the record until she is ready to send it to the police or other authorities. Users also can submit their report to a centralized database that can monitor for repeat offenders.


Callisto is being tested at the University of San Francisco and Pomona College starting in August. Ladd hopes to add languages besides English, and she’s planning to explore ways to adapt the program for companies that want to use it as a tool to address workplace sexual harassment and assault.

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Detroit Free Press: We are family - What ruling means for parents and children in metro Detroit

Detroit Free Press: We are family - What ruling means for parents and children in metro Detroit | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In March 2014, Diane, 48, and Dana Shaw, 47, of Rochester Hills became one of 322 Michigan couples married during the few hours between when a federal judge struck down Michigan's ban on same-sex marriage and when a federal appeals court brought such marriages to an abrupt halt.


On Friday, the U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for same-sex marriages throughout the country. In so doing, it removed a major hurdle to recognizing the Shaws as a family. [via @freep]

...

Kimberly Richman, associate professor of sociology and legal studies at the University of San Francisco and author of "License to Wed: What Legal Marriage Means to Same-Sex Couples," said the court's validation of such marriages adds a legitimacy to the couples as families.


"I also think you can never underscore enough the symbolic value of telling an entire nation that equal is equal," Richman said. "I think we'll see a huge dip, and I think we already have, in homophobic statements, violence against gay men and lesbians. There's a cultural shift that's happening, and this is only one piece of that shift that's happening symbolically."


Richman surveyed 1,400 couples and interviewed about 100 same-sex couples who had been married either in California or in Massachusetts for her book, which was released last year.


Before their marriages were legal, she said: "People felt disenfranchised. People felt their government, their state didn't recognize them as full, civic persons. They felt disrespected, and not like full citizens.

University of San Francisco's insight:
Kimberly Richman received her B.A. at Pitzer College in Claremont, California, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine, where she also completed a Graduate Emphasis in Women's Studies. Her research interests include gender, sexuality, and law; crime, law, and the social construction of "deviance"; family law; legal consciousness; court processes; and reintegrative programming for prison inmates. She is the author of the award winning book Courting Change (NYU Press) and multiple articles and book chapters on the topic of child custody and adoption for gay and lesbian parents, in which she investigates the negotiation of sexual and parental identity in family court, the problematic deployment of rights discourses in the LGBT family law context, and the development of expanded legal definitions of family over time. These articles appear in Law & Society ReviewLaw & Social InquiryStudies in Law, Politics, and Society, Law & Sexuality, and in the edited volume, The New Civil Rights Research. She is also the author of two articles on domestic violence, appearing in Sociological Inquiry and Studies in Law, Politics, and Society, and co-author of a book chapter on anti-gay violence (with Valerie Jenness) in the Handbook of Lesbian and Gay Studies
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Los Angeles Daily News: Convicted killers of women in L.A. County more likely to get death penalty

Los Angeles Daily News: Convicted killers of women in L.A. County more likely to get death penalty | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Chivalry and traditional roles between men and women influence jurors when deciding whether to issue a death sentence, according to a researcher who studies capital murder. 


Steven Shatz, a University of San Francisco law professor, studied 1,000 California murder cases where the defendant was eligible for the death penalty and found that killers of women were seven times more likely to be sentenced to death than those who killed men. The data rang true when Shatz examined 404 similar cases in Los Angeles County between 2003 and 2005.


“It’s pretty hard to get a jury to vote for death. It’s the most awesome act a jury can be asked to do,” Shatz said. “To get them to do it, you really have to evoke sympathy with the victim, and it’s far easier to do that for a woman victim.” [via @ladailynews]


University of San Francisco's insight:

Steven F. Shatz has taught at USF for more than 40 years. During that time, he has been an expert witness and consultant in numerous capital cases and authored several amicus briefs for the U.S. Supreme Court. Shatz has also been a lecturer at UC Berkeley, and a visiting professor at the East China Institute of Politics and Law, in Shanghai, China, and at UC Hastings College of Law. Shatz created, and for twelve years directed, USF’s Keta Taylor Colby Death Penalty Project, whose goal is to involve law students in the interim reform, and ultimate abolition, of the death penalty in the United States. Each summer, the project trains law students in death penalty law and practice and sends them to the South to work as interns with capital defense attorneys. Shatz is the author of casebooks on Criminal Law and Death Penalty Law and numerous journal articles, including his most recent on the racial geography of the death penalty—“Challenging the Death Penalty with Statistics: FurmanMcCleskey, and a Single County Case Study” (Cardozo Law Review, 2013) (with Terry Dalton)—and gender and the death penalty—"Chivalry is not Dead: Murder, Gender, and the Death Penalty" (Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law, and Justice, 2012) (with Naomi Shatz).



Education

  • AB, UC Berkeley
  • JD, Harvard University
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Rev. James Hanvey, S.J., Presents Summer Lecture Series at USF

Rev. James Hanvey, S.J., Presents Summer Lecture Series at USF | USF in the News | Scoop.it
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The Huffington Post: Now More Than Ever, We Must Talk About Slavery's Continuing Legacy in America

The Huffington Post: Now More Than Ever, We Must Talk About Slavery's Continuing Legacy in America | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In the aftermath of the racist murders of nine African Americans in a venerable church in Charleston, South Carolina, Americans are beginning to talk more openly about the issues of race and race relations in our nation. But a common denominator of much of this discussion is the absence of factual historical information about American slavery, the Civil War, the intent of the subsequent Reconstruction era and its demise following the presidential election of 1876 and the Compromise of 1877.



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Outlook India: From Coast to Coast, Americans Observe First Yoga Day

Outlook India: From Coast to Coast, Americans Observe First Yoga Day | USF in the News | Scoop.it

From coast to coast, from a small township in remote North Dakota to the historic National Mall in Washington, thousands of enthusiast Americans came out in large numbers with their mats to perform the ancient Indian spiritual practice, marking the first International Yoga Day.

Reflective of the increasing popularity of Yoga in the US, the organisers in Houston had to increase the capacity of their venue as a large number of health enthusiasts turned up for the celebrations.

For health-conscious Americans, Yoga is now practiced by one in every 10 Americans. The Yoga industry is estimated to be worth USD 27 billion in the United States alone. [via @OutlookIndia]

..

The University of San Francisco Professor, Vamsee Juluri, said though Yoga is Hindu in origin, it is universal in scope like much of Hindu philosophy.

"Doing Yoga doesn't mean anything more than what you want to take out of it--exercise, peace of mind, or right understanding," he said.

"International Yoga day can be the beginning of a greater dialogue between Hindu and other philosophies about how to create a better way of living," he said.

"The exercises are only an aid to clearing our thoughts, actions and lifestyles. There needs to be greater awareness of the many ethical ideals that also accompany yoga - like non-violence, non-greediness and cleanliness. In my view, yoga is a perfect antidote to consumer society!" Juluri said.

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Bloomberg Politics: The Real Math Behind Hillary Clinton's Candidacy

Bloomberg Politics: The Real Math Behind Hillary Clinton's Candidacy | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Elections are fundamentally about math, and the most fundamental of the fundamental factors is demographics—the ethnic and racial composition of the electorate.


So far, Hispanic voters have been getting the most attention from the media and from candidates courting them in announcement speeches and at events like NALEO, which Hillary Clinton addressed on Thursday. While those votes will certainly be important in 2016, blacks remain the crucial minority bloc for Democratic candidates.


As a number of different scholars, consultants, and journalists have demonstrated, the demographic changes we have seen in recent presidential elections and projections of the trend going forward are clear: The sheer number of eligible voters has shifted and continues to shift toward non-white groups, who overwhelmingly favor Democratic candidates. [via @bpolitics]

...

Ken Goldstein is professor of politics at the University of San Francisco and is Bloomberg Politics' polling and political advertising analyst.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Ken Goldstein is a professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco and Faculty Director of the USF in DC program. He also teaches in USF's Masters' Program in Public Affairs, which focuses on the skills needed to run a modern political campaign.


Goldstein combines his academic training with an ear for real politics and strategy as well as an impressive set of contacts and extensive professional experience in a variety of media, corporate, and political settings. He served as president of Kantar Media CMAG - a non-partisan Washington DC based political consulting firm that provides media intelligence and is the source of record on political advertising for campaigns, trade associations, and the news media. In 2012, Kantar Media CMAG clients included the Obama and Romney presidential campaigns.

More generally, Goldstein's reputation for unbiased and non-partisan analysis has made him a favorite source for politicians and the news media alike. 

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USA Today: Clinton stands apart from GOP on immigration

USA Today: Clinton stands apart from GOP on immigration | USF in the News | Scoop.it

LAS VEGAS — As the 2016 Republican presidential field toughens its tone on border security and enforcement, Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton has drawn a sharp distinction on immigration by embracing comprehensive reforms such as a pathway to citizenship for undocumented workers already in the United States.
 

Speaking Thursday before the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, Clinton, a former secretary of State, reiterated promises she made during a May 5 roundtable in North Las Vegas. [via @USAToday]

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Bill Hing, a University of San Francisco law professor and immigration policy expert, said that from the standpoint of immigrant rights advocates, Bill Clinton "has one of the worst immigration records" of any president in modern history.
 

Under his administration, the United States started the "big militarization of the border" through Operation Gatekeeper, which was aimed at stopping illegal immigration along the U.S.-Mexico border south of San Diego by deploying more Border Patrol agents, and installing fencing, ground sensors, lights and other technology, Hing said.


However, Hing doubts Bill Clinton's old positions on border security and immigration enforcement will hurt Hillary Clinton with Latinos.


"Latino voters are giving her a pass because the Republicans have been so intransigent on immigration reform," Hing said, pointing out that in recent years conservative Republicans have consistently foiled attempts by moderate Republicans and Democrats to pass immigration reform.

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KPCW: Cool Science Radio - June 11, 2015

KPCW: Cool Science Radio - June 11, 2015 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

....Max Planck is credited with being the father of quantum theory, and his work was described by his close friend Albert Einstein as "the basis of all twentieth-century physics."  We speak With Brandon Brown, biographer and author of the new book, Plank: Driven by Vision, Broken by War. (click on title to listen) [via @KPCWRadio]


University of San Francisco's insight:

Brandon Brown pursued doctoral training in superconductivity and low-temperature physics, with postdoctoral work in science communication. Once at the University of San Francisco, he shifted his research focus to sensory biophysics. His laboratory, his research students, and various collaborators have explored the electric and magnetic sensory abilities of a variety of creatures. Currently, he is completing a book about the life and work of German physicist Max Planck (1858-1947), to be published by Oxford University Press in 2015.  See his author page for more information.

From 2004-2008, Brandon served as Associate Dean for Sciences, and during this time the University completed planning stages for the new Center for Science and Innovation. Today, when not teaching or conducting research, he continues to spread the word about this project to alumni and other groups in his role as Director of External Affairs for the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Catholic San Francisco: 2015 Lane Center Summer Scholar

Catholic San Francisco: 2015 Lane Center Summer Scholar | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In a three-part lecture series at the University of San Francisco, Jesuit Father James Hanvey, former Lo Schiavo Chair at the Joan and Ralph Lane Center for Catholic Studies and Social Thought, will address theological questions related to the meaning and mission of the Catholic Church in today’s world.

Wednesday, July 8, 5-6:30 p.m.: “The Church and Contemporary Society: Setting the Secular Free”;

Wednesday, July 15, 5-6:30 p.m.: “Mercy as an Agent of Social Change: The Mission of the Church under Francis”;

Wednesday, July 22, 5-6:30 p.m.: “Living the Resurrection: Future Hope or Present Task?”

The free lectures will be held at Lone Mountain 100, Handlery Room, on the USF campus. 

University of San Francisco's insight:

James Hanvey specializes in systematic theology and Catholic Social Thought and Ignatian Spirituality. He received his doctorate from Oxford University on the Hegelian metaphysics of Trinitarian Theology and has taught systematic theology at Heythrop College, University of London. He was head of the Theology Department at Heythrop until he founded and was director of the Heythrop Institute for Religion, Ethics and Society in 2004. When he finished as director he was seconded to work as the theological consultant to the Catholic Bishops Conference of England and Wales. Although his main field is systematics, he has also held the Veale Chair in Ignatian Spirituality, The Milltown Institute, Dublin and he has also lectured and written on education, health care, and the Church's response to contemporary culture. He co-authored and influential report commissioned by the Catholic Education Service (England and Wales) entitled, 'On the Way to Life' which explored the challenges for Catholic Education in secular post-modern culture. He is currently working on a new book: The Theological Foundations of Catholic Social Teaching - The Witness of the Spirit as well as preparing a collection of papers on the theology of health care and contributory papers to various forthcoming publications: a legal collection on Human Dignity and papers on the anniversary of Vatican II.

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USF Students Creating Video Game Therapy

University of San Francisco's insight:

USF Computer Science Professor David Galles and his students have been doing some collaborative research with St. Mary's Hospital, creating  videogame-based therapies for stroke victims and other victims of traumatic injuries. Check out their real world work!

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VICE: Nobody Can Figure Out How to Fix San Francisco's Housing Crisis

VICE: Nobody Can Figure Out How to Fix San Francisco's Housing Crisis | USF in the News | Scoop.it

For better or worse, San Francisco has come to embody the term "gentrification." Between the city's tech-fueled boom, astronomical increase in the cost of living, and struggles with the influx of tech workers, the tale of SF's skyrocketing housing prices has become the biggest continuing news story in the region so far this decade.


We're at a point where headlines about evictions of elderly and disabled people due to property owners desiring to cash in have become so commonplace that outrage has been replaced with malaise and existential dread that our community will never be the same again. We're way past fatigue and closely approaching new-normal status. "It saddens me that the Mission that I grew up in is no longer what I remember," Mission resident Julio Cesar told me. "The feeling of the culture that made the Mission famous for what it was is no longer there. It's all starting to blend into the same type of culture." [via @VICE]

...

When I asked Corey Cook, Professor of American Politics at the University of San Francisco, about what the future holds for San Francisco, he told me, "Absent substantial public investment in affordable housing at the federal, state, and local level (much of which will not be forthcoming), changes in state law to protect tenants (which it appears the legislature will not enact), and regional cooperation to build affordable and moderate income housing particularly on the peninsula, I think the best we can hope for is some mitigation of the most extreme social dislocations in the city—using the limited policy tools to prevent evictions, utilize public resources to build affordable housing, support residents in public and subsidized housing with high quality integrated social services, and maintain strong inclusionary zoning policies and hope to wait out this cycle."

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NYU Press blog: Marriage equality - A conservative’s dream

NYU Press blog: Marriage equality - A conservative’s dream | USF in the News | Scoop.it

On November 4, 2008, I was lying in a hospital bed, on bed rest while pregnant with my twin daughters, watching the election coverage that first delivered the elated news of President Obama’s win, followed by the heartbreak that Californians had passed Proposition 8, inscribing a ban on same-sex marriage in the state constitution. On June 26, 2015, I awoke to a celebratory text message from the National Center for Lesbian Rights that the U.S. Supreme Court had declared a nation-wide fundamental right to marriage for all couples, same-sex or different sex, and had the joy of explaining what this meant to my now 6 ½ year old daughters. Quite literally, the world shifted in the time it took them to reach first grade. [via @nyupress]

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In short, the conservatives who fought for so long to “protect” marriage should be thrilled by Justice Kennedy’s sweeping affirmation of the importance of marriage as “a keystone of our social order” and “building block of our national community.” Indeed, these couples who undertook a years-long, expensive, taxing legal battle to enter the institution of marriage do far more to affirm it than do the rapidly increasing numbers of heterosexuals who have given up on marriage, and chosen to do family and romance without it.
 

It remains to be seen whether those—gay, straight, bi or trans—for whom dyadic marriage has no appeal take up the cause as fervently to extend the material benefits that accompany it in future legal and political actions. When they do so, one can only wonder whether they will find an ally in Justice Kennedy.
 

Kimberly D. Richman, author of License to Wed: What Legal Marriage Means to Same-Sex Couples (NYU Press, 2014) and Courting Change: Queer Parents, Judges, and the Transformation of American Family Law (NYU Press, 2009) is Associate Professor of Sociology and Legal Studies at the University of San Francisco.

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A Conversation with USF's Scott Sidwell

A Conversation with USF's Scott Sidwell | USF in the News | Scoop.it

This is an in-depth Q&A with USF Athletic Director Scott Sidwell which provides honest insight on the "state of athletics." 

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KGO-AM Radio: James Taylor on President Obama and the 'N' Word

University of San Francisco's insight:

James Lance Taylor is author of the book Black Nationalism in the United States: From Malcolm X to Barack Obama, which earned 2011 "Outstanding Academic Title" -Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries (January 2012). (Ranked top 3 percent of 25,000 books submitted and top 8 percent of 7,300 actually accepted for review by the American Library Association).


He is the Immediate Past President of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS), an important organization of African American, African, and Afro Caribbean political scientists in the United States.


He is associate professor and Chair of the Department of Politics at the University of San Francisco. His undergraduate degree is from Pepperdine University and his graduate degrees were earned at the University of Southern California (USC). He has taught previously as a Visiting Associate Professor of political science at Saint Louis University in Madrid, Spain and political science and African American Studies at University of California, Berkeley.

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Bloomberg: The One Thing Bernie-mentum Can't Overcome - Demographics

Bloomberg: The One Thing Bernie-mentum Can't Overcome - Demographics | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Could Bernie Sanders really be the nominee? Recently, some on the left have dared to hope. Reports of large, fervent crowds and growing poll results from some early states fueled significant media discussion of a surge for Sanders as he challenges quasi-incumbent Hillary Clinton for the Democratic presidential nomination.
 

Our own Bloomberg Politics poll showed that while Clinton retained strong leads in both New Hampshire and Iowa, Sanders’ support was increasing and assessments of Clinton softened a bit. A CNN New Hampshire poll out a day later showed a much closer race and highlighted Clinton’s “dwindling” lead. While you may want to take it with a grain of salt because he is a Republican, well-respected pollster Glen Bolger flat out predicted that Sanders would beat Clinton in both Iowa and New Hampshire. [via @bpolitics]

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Ken Goldstein is professor of politics at the University of San Francisco and is Bloomberg Politics' polling and political advertising analyst.

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BusinessInsider: San Francisco's 'tech mayor' is facing a cakewalk re-election -- even though the city is at war with itself

BusinessInsider: San Francisco's 'tech mayor' is facing a cakewalk re-election  --  even though the city is at war with itself | USF in the News | Scoop.it

San Francisco is a city where great economic prosperity, driven in large part by the tech industry, has lowered the unemployment rate to 3.5 per cent and created a budget surplus.


That same prosperity, though, has created friction in the city by the bay.


San Francisco has the second highest income inequality in the nation — mainly because its rich are really rich, according to the Brookings Institute.


The rent is now the highest in the country. The artists, writers and schoolteachers that gave the city its flavour are being priced out by cafes offering $US4 slices of toast and housing developers who are getting rich off the city’s economic boom.


This is San Francisco in 2015, and its mayor is Ed Lee.

...

University of San Francisco political science professor Corey Cook pointed to Lee’s interplay between tech and politics as how he plays the game, and he’s playing it well. His use of behested payments and talking to the tech companies when he needs some support is just one example.


“It’s clear that the industry is influential. I think he thinks that the future of San Francisco is going to be grown by the tech sector,” Cook said. “They have shown the capacity to become engaged philanthropically. I think from his own statements that he’s argued that tech is part of the solution.”


When the tech bus issue flared up, the city acted and instituted the pilot program to allow the companies to pay for using public bus stops. That protest movement is all but dead now

[via @BusInsiderAU]

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Chicago Tribune: Summer campers now code

Chicago Tribune: Summer campers now code | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Eight-year-old Claire Dormanen assumed her role as a summer camper this month in many traditional ways: She wore a comfy T-shirt and shorts, scarfed down a sack lunch and ran frantically to escape elimination during a game of dodgeball.


But Claire also added a new activity to her regular camp schedule this year: computer coding. For three hours on a recent Friday, campers built creatures out of Legos and then wrote computer programs to make them move.


"This is where the world is going," said Claire's mother, Audrey Dormanen, of Oak Park, who enrolled her daughter in the full day sports/coding combination camp at Code Play Learn, an Oak Park business. "It's embracing technology and embracing what's going to be core to your life." [via @chicagotribune]

...

"For me, the idea of having kids coding at 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 years old is just absurd," said Jim Taylor, an adjunct professor of psychology at the University of San Francisco and author of "Raising Generation Tech: Preparing Your Children for a Media-Fueled World." "Time spent coding is time not spent playing, which is far more important for creativity, social interaction, and development of motor and social skills."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Taylor has worked with professional, world-class, junior, and age-group athletes in many sports for over 20 years. A former alpine ski racer who held a top-20 national ranking and competed internationally, Jim is a 2nd degree black belt and certified instructor in karate, a certified tennis coach, a marathon runner, and an Ironman triathlete. Jim is the author of eight books, has published over 400 articles in popular and professional publications, and has given more than 500 workshops and presentations throughout the North America and Europe.

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Examiner: No race left behind for Hillary Clinton in wake of Charleston shootings

Examiner: No race left behind for Hillary Clinton in wake of Charleston shootings | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Adam Lanza was a kid left behind. His earliest school records from his primary days at Sandy Hook Elementary show a record that his chief complaint was that nobody had time for him. James Holmes was a kid left behind. Nobody, but his shrink who was getting paid, seemed to have any time for him either. It is now all on record at his death penalty trial. After each of these tragedies, that combined left 40 American families in grief, the politicking began. Get the crazies and the guns off the streets and as far away from us as possible, and this problem all goes away. In the wake of the shootings in Charleston, South Carolina, that left 9 more Americans dead this week, the tables turned. An entire race was left behind when Dylan Roof opened fire on Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, and the politicking has begun. It’s the usual suspects saying the usual things, but this time with a side of racism. The New York Times reported June 20 that this weekend Hillary Clinton offered her “boldest remarks yet” on the topics of gun violence, to a country wracked with racism. And, according to numbers crunched by Bloomberg Politics on June 22, it may be just what Hillary needs to lock this election. [via @examinercom]

...

Ken Goldstein, a University of San Francisco politics professor and polling analyst for Bloomberg Politics reported today that winning an election is all about having the numbers in your favor. He also reported that so far, that’s a good thing for Hillary. Minority groups in America “overwhelmingly favor” the Democratic camp, and not just because of Obama.


In fact historically, minorities have leaned the Democratic way. In the last election, Goldstein writes that the 5 million vote lead that locked Obama’s second term was largely the minority vote. He led the way in the African American vote, in many of the southern states and some key battleground states.


Goldstein also reported that when it comes to minorities, the “demographic math” for the GOP is problematic. Capturing the Hispanic vote continues to be a significant challenge for the GOP. Goldstein also reported that the Democrats don’t even need to replicate last election season’s results with minorities to win this election.

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Sync Magazine: Interview - Opinder Bawa of the University of San Francisco

Sync Magazine: Interview - Opinder Bawa of the University of San Francisco | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In his role as CIO at the University of San Francisco, Opinder Bawa is continually asking, what do you teach the next generation of technology leaders?


Opinder Bawa does not distinguish between his roles as an executive and an educator.


As the University of San Francisco’s (USF) vice president and CIO, he places equal importance on finding innovative solutions and sharing them with the university and students. His comfort with multiple roles stems from his childhood—during which his father’s diplomatic responsibilities from India took his family to a new country every few years—and from his appreciation of the Jesuit tradition, which has long sought to build a more humane and just world. USF’s 10,000 graduate and undergraduate students learn from a diverse array of faculty who, like Bawa, bring real-world experience from industries ranging from technology to the nonprofit sector. Sync spoke to Bawa about the transformation of higher education.

[Read the full story via @SyncTechLeaders]



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Los Angeles Times: 'How did we let this happen?' The Amy Winehouse question and social science's take on modern fame

Los Angeles Times: 'How did we let this happen?' The Amy Winehouse question and social science's take on modern fame | USF in the News | Scoop.it

There's lots of blame to throw around when it comes to the early demise of Amy Winehouse. 


From drug abuse and alcoholism to eating disorders and bad relationships, there's a clear trail of breadcrumbs leading to the singer's death in 2011. Since her passing, everything that ever happened to Winehouse, both at the time and in retrospect, has been examined: Her complicated childhood and overbearing father. Her toxic relationship with husband Blake Fielder-Civil. Label deals that asked too much. Promoters who booked her before she was ready. [via @latimes]

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"There's no boundaries to who can weigh in on what you've done and what you are doing," says Joshua Gamson, a sociologist at the University of San Francisco and author of "Claims to Fame: Celebrity in Contemporary America." "Your story is a commodity, so people are actually competing for the profit from that commodity ... [Celebrities] try to stay in control of their story — that's why they hire publicists, why they hide out — but that's part of the deal with celebrity. It's what keeps you successful."


"On a much smaller scale, we're [all] increasingly, consciously performing for others — we're massaging our stories on social media to project a self," Gamson explains. He says he's given interviews like this one, about our fascination with these narratives, multiple times per year since "Claims to Fame" was published in 1994. "So we project that [anxiety] onto the people who are living it full time.


"I don't know if it's a relief, but it is a reminder that even all the resources and status [of celebrity] do not protect you from not being able to trust people, from being able to tell the difference between your image and yourself."


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E-Campus News: Catching campus rapists via an online reporting tool

E-Campus News: Catching campus rapists via an online reporting tool | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Colleges have been heavily criticized in recent years for the high frequency of sexual assaults on campus—and for their failure to support victims adequately and punish attackers. Now, the University of San Francisco is hoping that a new web-based reporting tool will help victims of sexual assault take back control of their lives, file charges if they choose—and identify serial attackers.
 

The new tool, known as Callisto, is the product of Sexual Health Innovations, a nonprofit organization that first unveiled the concept during a “data jam” held by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault in 2014. USF will be the first college to implement the new tool when it launches a pilot this August. [via @ecampusnews]

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“The decision to report a sexual assault by talking to campus police or local police—or even someone in a university office—can be a daunting process,” says Peter Novak, vice provost for student life at USF. “If we can make that process available to students in the privacy of their own room to learn about that process more effectively, then we think it will provide many more options for students.”


“We want them to know that we can help them academically and personally, so that they can maintain their work in the classroom and can feel safe while they’re here,” said Novak, noting that victims might have difficulty concentrating in class, for example, or want to create a no-contact order against the alleged perpetrator. “These are the same things we discuss when we meet in person with a victim, but the online environment gives them more time to reflect on their own desires and wants.”

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