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China Daily USA: Port dispute over, shelves take time to restock

China Daily USA: Port dispute over, shelves take time to restock | USF in the News | Scoop.it

For this Lunar New Year, many Chinese people may feel a little less "Chinese" because their favorite decorations and festival foods are stranded on container ships at anchor off the US' West Coast thanks to a protracted labor dispute between the longshoremen's union and port employers.

"We were short of traditional Chinese pastry, sweets, soybean sauce, noodles and especially the popular New Year gift baskets," said Taylor Chow, spokesman for the Oriental Food Association in the San Francisco Bay Area, whose members import food from the Chinese mainland, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

The nine-month slowdown caused by the labor stand-off at West Coast ports, critical gateways for US-Asia trade, has crippled the container traffic and disrupted the supply chain, hitting Chinese food distributors who had expected more business during the 15-day Chinese New Year, which lasts from Feb 19 till March 5. [via @chinadailyusa]

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The recent escalation of the dispute has dramatically slowed US farm and manufacturing goods as well, said Stanley Kwong, professor of international marketing at University of San Francisco.

"It was especially damaging for fresh fruit growers as loads of California fresh citrus were stranded in warehouses rotting on the docks. The just-in-time delivery system used by many factories and retailers leaves little margin for delay," he said.

"The Spring Festival period is normally the busiest time of year for local packers sending citrus to Asia," said Kwong. California producers who rely on foreign exports include growers of fresh fruit, alfalfa, almonds, walnuts, rice and wine grapes.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Stanley Kwong brings to USF over 30 years of international management, marketing and teaching experience in the US, China, India, and Central Europe. Professor Kwong is recognized as a leading expert on marketing strategy, branding, and investments policies and is frequently interviewed on branding in China and Chinese investments in the U.S. by top media, such as the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, SingTao News, and Chinese World Journal. He is a highly desired guest speaker at industry conferences and universities worldwide.
 

As a former Worldwide Program Director for IBM Developers Marketing, Professor Kwong shares his multifaceted experience-based knowledge of outsourcing and offshoring, globalization trends, marketing management and international business with his undergraduate, MBA and MBAE students.

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USF Welcomes #BlackLivesMatter co-founder to Feb. 24 Teach-In

USF Welcomes #BlackLivesMatter co-founder to Feb. 24 Teach-In | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The University of San Francisco (USF) Center for Diversity Outreach & Community Engagement is proud to host, “Speak Out & Listen In: A Teach-In on Building Community Power” on Tuesday, Feb. 24. This interactive, day-long teach-in brings together students, professors, university leadership, community members, law enforcement, and activists to raise awareness about prejudice, privilege, and persecution, in the wake of national protests alleging widespread police violence against African-Americans.


A key panel discussion of the day, starting at 2:40 p.m., will focus on the power of building community, and feature the following panelists:


--Joseph E. Marshall, Founding President, Alive & Free – Omega Boys Club
--Greg Suhr, San Francisco Police Chief
--Melvin Cowan, Employment and Education Specialist, First Place for Youth
--Lena Miller, Founder and Executive Director of Development, Hunter’s Point Family

For a complete schedule, please visit: www.usfca.edu/Diversity/Speak_Out___Listen_In/
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National Geographic: Search for the Giant Chinese Swamp Cypress - Meet the Tree Team

National Geographic: Search for the Giant Chinese Swamp Cypress - Meet the Tree Team | USF in the News | Scoop.it

For this National Geographic-sponsored expedition to save the Critically Endangered Chinese swamp cypress (Glyptostrobus pensilis), we have brought together a dynamic group of people from the U.S., Scotland, and Laos. Let me introduce you to our team.

We broke up into three groups to conduct surveys in promising watersheds of the Nakai-Nam Theun National Protected Area in the Annamite Mountain range in central Laos to locate previously undocumented populations of this beautiful, useful, and endangered tree. [via @natgeo]

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I’m the lead on the Ecology Team. Couldn’t do it without my graduate student from the University of San Francisco, Robin Hunter, who is studying for her Masters of Science in Environmental Management, or without our crucial Lao collaborators from the National University of Laos, our government foresters, and villagers.

University of San Francisco's insight:

USF’s Gretchen Coffman is leading an international rescue effort to save an endangered cypress tree on the verge of extinction. Coffman, a restoration ecologist, compares the Southeast Asia cypress to California’s majestic redwoods, and National Geographic is funding her campaign. 


Dr. Coffman's current research focuses on scientific questions with high relevance to management problems, mainly related to riparian plant ecology, restoration, and invasive plant biology in river systems of mediterranean-type and tropical climates. Currently, she has on-going research projects along rivers and watersheds in coastal southern California, the San Francisco Bay Area, the Central Valley of California, and Southeast Asia.
She teaches courses in applied ecology, environmental science, restoration ecology, and ecosystem ecology. During the summer she teaches wetland restoration ecology and wetland delineation in the Wetland Science Series at SFSU's Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies in Tiburon, California.

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Bloomberg Radio: Mark Cannice on VC Confidence Index Survey

Mark V. Cannice, Ph.D. is an internationally recognized scholar, teacher, and speaker on entrepreneurship and venture capital. He is Department Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation with the University of San Francisco School of Management.
 

Dr. Cannice writes the widely-followed quarterly Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index Report® which is published by ProQuest and EBSCO, carried globally on Bloomberg Professional Services in 125 countries (Bloomberg ticker symbol: SVVCCI), and has been referenced in the Economist, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Xinhua News Service, Der Speigel, CNBC, National Public Radio, and many other media. He has written similar quarterly reports on the Chinese venture capital industry, China Venture Capitalist Confidence Index Report™ (Bloomberg ticker symbol: CVCCI).
 

Professor Cannice's research in venture capital and technology management has been published in many leading academic journals (e.g. Management International Review, Journal of High Technology Management Research, Venture Capital: An International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance, Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship), and he is the co-author of Management: A Global, Innovative, and Entrepreneurial Perspective, 14th edition (2013) (published and distributed by McGraw-Hill in four languages).

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San Jose Mercury News: 'A-list' candidates battle for state Senate post in District 7

San Jose Mercury News: 'A-list' candidates battle for state Senate post in District 7 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

When it comes to politics, Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla has followed the path blazed by Rep. Mark DeSaulnier: from the Concord City Council, to the Contra Costa board of supervisors to the Assembly.
 

Now with DeSaulnier having replaced George Miller in Congress, Bonilla is a leading contender to fill his vacant state Senate seat. She has the largest campaign war chest and backing from the local Democratic establishment including DeSaulnier and much of organized labor.
 

But that might not be enough to win the March 17 special primary election that has turned into a Democratic battle royale to win a spot in the anticipated runoff election May 19. Among those also vying for the seat are recently termed-out Assemblywoman Joan Buchanan, D-Alamo, who like Bonilla is seen as a leader on education issues, and Orinda Mayor Steve Glazer, a political consultant who ran Jerry Brown's 2010 gubernatorial campaign and has emerged as a thorn in the side of organized labor.
 

"A lot of folks have been talking about this being an interesting battle because these are A-list candidates," said Corey Cook, director of the University of San Francisco's Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good. "It's three people seen as pragmatic, problem-solving politicians." [via @mercnews]

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Marin Indepedent Journal: Few people show up in San Geronimo Valley for Marin county’s offer of free measle vaccincations

Marin Indepedent Journal: Few people show up in San Geronimo Valley for Marin county’s offer of free measle vaccincations | USF in the News | Scoop.it

University of San Francisco nursing student Kaitlin Armas puts a bandage on the arm of Drake High School student Kean Edwards, 15, after receiving a measles vaccine on Thursday at the San Geronimo Valley Community Center.

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Close to a dozen Marin county health care workers visited San Geronimo Valley Community Center on Thursday hoping to make a dent in the large number of unvaccinated students in the Lagunitas School District.
 

The health workers came equipped with about 120 doses of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, but only two kids and two adults showed up for a shot during the three-hour free vaccination clinic. The county sponsored the clinic at the request of the school district’s principal Laura Shain.
 

“We called all our families who have a student who hasn’t had the MMR vaccination to inform them that this was a free clinic coming Thursday and to make use of it,” Shain said.

Information on the vaccine and its safety was also sent home with unvaccinated students at Lagunitas School and San Geronimo Valley School on Tuesday. [via @marinij]


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The San Francisco Chronicle: Serial flight stowaway Marilyn Hartman can’t be forced to get care

The San Francisco Chronicle: Serial flight stowaway Marilyn Hartman can’t be forced to get care | USF in the News | Scoop.it

To police and airline security guards, Marilyn Hartman’s habit of jumping onto flights without a ticket — as the former San Franciscan is said to have done again, this time on a plane from Minnesota to Florida — is a criminal nuisance, and reason aplenty to place her in a mental home.


But don’t expect that placement to happen any time soon, authorities said. As long as the 63-year-old woman dubbed “the serial stowaway” doesn’t pose a threat to herself or anyone else, under California and Florida law she can’t be forced into an institution.

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The Rev. Gerdenio Manuel, a clinical psychologist and professor at the University of San Francisco, said it appears Hartman is suffering from a classic form of Walter Mitty adventurism.


Some who suffer from depression — which Hartman was treated for in 2014 in a residential mental facility in Redwood City, according to authorities — can at times react extremely by concocting wild adventures for themselves, Manuel said.


Seeking to escape

“It’s an attempt to escape a painful or dreary reality,” he said. “There’s obviously something going on in this woman’s reality that she wants to escape.”

University of San Francisco's insight:

Fr. Gerdenio (Sonny) Manuel, S.J. is Director of USF's Saint Ignatius Institute and Professor of Psychology at USF. He is also the Provincial Assistant for Higher Education and Prefect of Studies for the California Province of the Jesuits.


Fr. Manuel's areas of scholarship include coping with stress and traumatic life events and the relationship of psychology, faith, and religious life. He is the author of Living Celibacy, Healthy Pathways for Priests published by Paulist Press. His teaching interests include positive psychology, abnormal psychology, and clinical psychology.
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LA Times: Silicon Valley investors' confidence tempered by high start-up valuations

LA Times: Silicon Valley investors' confidence tempered by high start-up valuations | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Uneasiness about the high values being attached to major start-ups diluted Silicon Valley venture capitalists’ increased confidence in the start-up market as 2014 came to close.


Released Tuesday, University of San Francisco entrepreneurship professor Mark Cannice’s quarterly survey of about two dozen venture capitalists in Northern California showed a slight uptick in investor confidence during the last three months of 2014 compared to the previous quarter. That’s partly because Wall Street and larger tech companies have had a large appetite for start-ups.

But Cannice said confidence levels would have been higher if not for a cautious outlook. A number of start-ups, which have yet to produce profits, are being valued at tens of billions of dollars just a few years into their existence. The fear is that investors in the public stock market won’t buy shares at the high valuations being set by private market investors eager to get a piece of high-profile start-ups. [via @latimes]

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Silicon Valley Business Journal: Silicon Valley VC confidence back up a notch, despite valuation concerns

Silicon Valley Business Journal: Silicon Valley VC confidence back up a notch, despite valuation concerns | USF in the News | Scoop.it

A quarterly survey of Silicon Valley venture capitalists showed slight improvement in their confidence about the investment climate. The index dropped for the first time in two years in the previous quarter and didn't get back to its previous high for the year, despite the fourth-quarter uptick.


"Confidence moved slightly higher as a continuing strong exit, investment and fundraising environment tempered concerns over inflated valuations in some venture sectors," wrote Mark Cannice, chair of the University of San Francisco School of Management. He has written the report for 11 years. [via @SVbizjournal]

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ZYZZYVA: Astonishing and Everlasting Work: 'Reformations: Dürer and the New Age of Print' at USF

ZYZZYVA: Astonishing and Everlasting Work: 'Reformations: Dürer and the New Age of Print' at USF | USF in the News | Scoop.it

During the Renaissance, it may have been the Italians who mastered the painted canvas, but it was the Northern Europeans who mastered the print. Perhaps the best artist to come out of that period, Albrecht Dürer (1472-1528) sought to prove he could do with woodblocks and copper plates what any Italian painter boasted with his paintbrush. Perspective, proportion, and balance, Dürer achieved it all.


In Reformations: Dürer and the New Age of Print, an exhibit running at the Thacher Gallery at the University of San Francisco till February 22, prints by the legendary print-maker are showcased along with some of the first books to be made using moveable type and printing presses. Collectively, the pieces consider the impact of this Renaissance technology as it transformed social, cultural, and artistic movements.


While slow, these transitions are striking; one enters the dimly-lit space to examine cases of manuscripts—hand-written works of art that alone warrant a visit to this free show—and continues along to see some of the earliest surviving printed books, mainly religious texts beautifully bound and hand-colored. These texts, though old, reveal not only the developing technology of bookmaking but also the technology of reading. Bookmakers used visual tricks to draw the reader’s eye to important parts of the text. Red marks often highlight the beginning of each sentence, making the mass of letters on the page more digestible.

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Milwaukee Journal Sentinal: San Francisco arena emerges with no public subsidy

Milwaukee Journal Sentinal: San Francisco arena emerges with no public subsidy | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Just like the Milwaukee Bucks, the Golden State Warriors plan to build a state-of-the-art arena surrounded by new economic development, all in the name of driving economic growth and building a world-class organization that competes for championships.


But there is one big difference.


The Warriors' owners, led by a Silicon Valley venture capitalist and a Hollywood entertainment mogul, are building their $600 million arena in San Francisco's Mission Bay neighborhood, just south of AT&T Park, with their own money. There is no public subsidy.

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Corey Cook, a political science professor at the University of San Francisco who studied at the University of Wisconsin, said the Warriors were, like the Bucks, smart to reach out to the community to tout the merits of the new arena and related development.


"They built a huge amount of goodwill," said Cook. "They're going about this in the right way."


And there is some precedence. AT&T Park, where the San Francisco Giants play, was largely self-financed.


"The Giants park has been everything that people hoped for," Cook said. "It revitalized the neighborhood."

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The Jewish Week: Was Pope Francis Speaking To The Jews?

The Jewish Week: Was Pope Francis Speaking To The Jews? | USF in the News | Scoop.it

A few weeks ago, in his second Christmas address to the Curia (the leadership of the Catholic Church), Pope Francis gave every Catholic in the world (approximately 1.2 billion of them) something to think about.
 

And not just the Catholics. Us — we Jews — as well.
 

What did he say? He indicted the Vatican bureaucracy. He called for not only structural reform, but spiritual reform as well. In tones reminiscent of Martin Luther’s “95 Theses,” he listed 15 “ailments of the Curia,” coupled with a powerful call for change. He coined a haunting term — “spiritual Alzheimer’s” — an ailment that forces leaders to forget why they entered their professions, and that forces them to become too occupied with perpetuating their own organizational systems.
 

True, the pope was speaking to Vatican leadership. But his call should not end there. It should prompt American Jewish communal leaders to examine our own communal “ailments.” Indeed, this is not to say that there are not many positive developments and programs in the Jewish community. But I am concerned that addressing our ailments is not a top priority.
 

Here is a short list: assimilation; alienation; the high costs of Jewish living; pervasive confusion about Jewish organizational missions; tension about the different ways that the Jewish community engages with Israel; the need for greater Jewish presence on campus, to name just a few. As we begin 2015, there are three ailments that require the reflection and honest self-assessment of all Jewish institutions: synagogues, JCCs, federations, etc. Although examples always run the risk of overstating or simplifying the issue, I believe each example provides a lens into major issues that need to be addressed in the Jewish community.

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Lee Bycel is the rabbi of Congregation Beth Shalom of Napa Valley and adjunct professor at the University of San Francisco’s Swig Program in Jewish Studies and Social Justice.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Lee graduated from the University of California at Berkeley with a B.A. in Philosophy, received rabbinic ordination from the Hebrew Union College, and earned a doctorate from the Claremont School of Theology. Lee has made several humanitarian trips to East Africa including five trips to Darfur, Chad, and South Sudan where he visited refugee and IDP camps. He has also made numerous trips to Kenya, Haiti and Ethiopia where he helped to address a variety of humanitarian issues related to poverty and disease. In April of 2006 he was in Rwanda for the 12th commemoration of their genocide. In 1988 he was a guest of the German government to observe how the Holocaust was being taught.
 

Lee writes often for the Huffington Post on a variety of social issues. He also founded CedarStreet Leadership, which works with leaders and organizations in the area of creative and strategic leadership. He serves on the Board of 3 Generation, a non-profit organization dedicated to helping survivors of genocide tell their stories to the world using film.

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Huffington Post: Black History Month - From Slavery to Obama and Beyond

Huffington Post: Black History Month - From Slavery to Obama and Beyond | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Why do we as a nation celebrate Black History Month? Why are there no French, Dutch, German, Spanish, Jewish, Scandinavian, Irish, Scottish, Greek, etc., history months?
 

We do so because none of the ancestors of those ethnic groups were brought here from their respective country of origin and enslaved in the United States for centuries with de jure sanction, enforcement, and approval of their enslavement by successor governments of the United States from 1619 to the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, and thereafter enduring de facto racial segregation and oppression approved by successor national governments until the 20th century.
 

A close white family friend humorously and sarcastically likes to remind me each year that even in the celebration of Black History Month, our nation chose February, the month with the fewest days.

The principal cultural consequence of the institution of slavery was the systemic exclusion or distortion of the achievements and contributions of African Americans in the history books and media of our country. Consider the history of black people in the United States depicted in movies like Birth of a Nation and Gone With the Wind, in theatrical stage productions of blackface minstrel shows, and the long-running radio series Amos & Andy.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Jones is currently a Visiting Professor, University of San Francisco and a Scholar Writer in Residence, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research & Education Institute, Stanford University, and Palo Alto, CA. In a distinguished and heralded career, Clarence B. Jones served as political advisor, counsel and draft speechwriter for the Reverend Dr, Martin Luther King, Jr., joined Sanford I. Weill and Arthur Levitt, Jr. in Carter, Berlind & Weill, Inc. as an Allied Member of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), becoming the "first African American " partner in a Wall Street investment banking firm, has been twice recognized as Fortune Magazine's "Business Man of the Month," and founded successful financial, corporate and media-related ventures. He has also provided strategic legal and financial consulting services to several governments around the world including The Bahamas, The Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and Zambia.

Dr. Jones has received numerous state and national awards recognizing his significant contributions to American society. Through his work in the civil rights movement, he has dramatically impacted the course of American history. He coordinated the legal defense of Dr. King and the other leaders of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference against the libel suits filed against them and The New York Times by the police commissioner and other city officials of Birmingham, AL. The Supreme Court ruling in this case - Sullivan vs. The New York Times - resulted in the landmark decision on the current law of libel.

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USF’s China Business Studies Initiative Hosts: Cracking the U.S. Market, Feb. 26-28

USF’s China Business Studies Initiative Hosts: Cracking the U.S. Market, Feb. 26-28 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The China Business Studies Initiative (CBSI) at the University of San Francisco (USF) School of Management, in partnership with City of San Francisco, Bay Area Council, Bank of China and East West Bank, and Sterling Bank & Trust, is proud to host its inaugural international conference, “Cracking the U.S. Market: Opportunities and Threats for Chinese Multinationals,” Feb. 26-28. This interactive, three-day conference brings together world-renowned scholars, investors, business leaders, and policy makers to exchange ideas, strategies, and solutions to the challenges that face Chinese businesses seeking to invest in the United States.

“This CBSI conference presents business opportunities and potential capital injection for San Francisco firms and start-ups,” said Xiaohua Yang, director of China Business Studies Initiative at USF.  “Bay Area business executives will be able to network with Chinese investors, as well as and some of the brightest minds and most well-known scholars who study Chinese business trends. This conference is the perfect blend of academic insights and real world business ventures.”

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The Guardian: California takes fight to soft drink industry with plan for warning labels

The Guardian: California takes fight to soft drink industry with plan for warning labels | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Campaigners against sugary drinks have opened a new front in California with a proposal to label the drinks with warnings about obesity, diabetes and tooth decay.
 

Bill Monning, the state’s senate majority leader, and an influential Democrat, has introduced a bill which would require labels be placed on the front of containers or at the point of purchase.
 

If passed, it will set a precedent in the US and potentially transform public health policy, according to supporters. [via @guardian]

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Corey Cook, a political science professor at the University of San Francisco who has tracked the soda battles, agreed that the campaign had momentum but questioned whether the bill would become law. “It’s still pretty early in the evolution of this policy issue.”
 

As someone with diabetes, and the father of two young children, Cook said he had a personal interest in the subject. “Diabetes is no fun. When I’m out and I see three and five-year-olds having soda with dinner it makes me cringe. That’s astonishing to me. You sort of want to go over and say something (to the parents) but I resist.”

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SF Examiner: SF nonprofit expands tech lab for homeless and poor Tenderloin residents

SF Examiner: SF nonprofit expands tech lab for homeless and poor Tenderloin residents | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The first year the St. Anthony Foundation opened its computer stations to the Tenderloin community, the technology lab ran dozens of computers on an Internet connection you might find in a private home.

When Craigslist founder Craig Newmark, a longtime San Francisco resident, heard of the slothlike computer lab at the nonprofit in 2008, he said he “found the right civic-minded guy at Comcast” to fix the problem.

“Within 48 hours they were digging up our sidewalk,” St. Anthony spokesman Karl Robillard said of the upgrade. Now, seven years later, the nonprofit is set to celebrate something even more technologically advanced. [via @sfexaminer]

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“Zynga is one of the most prolific,” said Robillard, noting that the University of San Francisco also offers used computer parts annually and Dolby made a recent donation of 20 new computers to replace old machines or act as backups.

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Washington Post: More than 500 researchers sign NCLB letter to Congress - stop test-focused reforms

Washington Post: More than 500 researchers sign NCLB letter to Congress - stop test-focused reforms | USF in the News | Scoop.it

More than 500 education researchers around the country have signed an open letter to Congress and the Obama administration about how the No Child Left Behind law should be rewritten, saying that they “strongly urge departing from test-focused reforms that not only have been discredited for high-stakes decisions, but also have shown to widen, not close, gaps and inequities.”  [via @washingtonpost]

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Here is an open letter to Congress and the Obama administration from more than 500 educational researcher across the country:


Dear Members of Congress and the Obama Administration:
 

We are researchers and professors in colleges, universities, and other research institutions throughout the United States with scholarly and practical expertise in public education, including education policy, school reform, teaching and learning, assessment, and educational equity. As Congress revises and reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, we strongly urge departing from test-focused reforms that not only have been discredited for high-stakes decisions, but also have shown to widen, not close, gaps and inequities. The current reauthorization provides an historic opportunity to leverage federal resources to address the deeper and more systemic problems with strategies that research has compellingly demonstrated to be far more effective in improving the educational opportunities and success of all students, particularly those in highest need. Specifically, we write to endorse the concerns, analyses, and recommendations in the recently released policy memo from the National Education Policy Center, “Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act: Time to Move Beyond Test-focused Policies,” which is available online at http://nepc.colorado.edu/publication/esea.
 

The following researchers endorse the NEPC memo, as of February 13, 2015. Affiliations are listed for identification purposes only. The signature list on this page will be updated daily. Your name will not appear immediately upon signing on. Total number of signers to date: 406
 

Contact Person: Kevin Kumashiro, Dean, University of San Francisco School of Education, kkumashiro@usfca.edu


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Matthew M.'s curator insight, February 17, 11:40 PM

This is just another great article elaborating on the No Child Left Behind Act, which was a part in the text book reading which explained the services that schools would provide for disabled students, and students who were getting left behind. The Article discusses the debate over the re writing of the act.

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Business Insider: Your old emails are fair game to the US government

Business Insider: Your old emails are fair game to the US government | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Government officials who want to read any emails sent and received by Americans more than six months ago can do so without a search warrant, Lindsay Wise of McClatchy reports.
 

Emails older than 180 days are fair game to federal agents who can access your old documents using the administrative subpoena power given the government by a loophole in The Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986. [via @businessinsider]

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“Some people think Congress did a pretty good job in 1986 seeing the future, but that was before the World Wide Web,” Susan Freiwald, a professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law and an expert in electronic surveillance law, told the New York Times in 2011. “The law can’t be expected to keep up without amendments.”




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Jessica Cusick's curator insight, February 24, 12:28 PM

I do not think the government should be able to read old emails if they cannot come into my house and look for old documents without a search warrant. There should be some sort of Act that can now protect Americans from the government reading their personal emails. This act should have been made years ago because the World Wide Web has been around for numerous decades and will be for a long, long, long time. 

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San Jose Mercury News: Gavin Newsom announces he'll run for California governor in 2018

San Jose Mercury News: Gavin Newsom announces he'll run for California governor in 2018 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom is filing his first paperwork to run for governor in 2018. 


"Newsom is a frontrunner, but it's too early to proclaim him the frontrunner," said Corey Cook, a political expert who directs the University of San Francisco's Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good.


He said Newsom starts with advantages of high name recognition in California and nationwide -- and proven ability to raise money.

"But we don't know what shape the Republican Party is going to be in at that point, let alone what other Democrats might choose to get into the race," Cook noted. "And history has shown the transition from lieutenant governor to governor isn't seamless. ... It's not the launching pad to the governor's office that a lot of people assume."

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Associated Press: Patz trial the latest where mental illness clouds confession

Associated Press: Patz trial the latest where mental illness clouds confession | USF in the News | Scoop.it

NEW YORK (AP) -- In an interrogation that stretched 12 hours, the man confessed to the murder and supplied chilling details of the crime. Stepping before jurors in an upstate New York courtroom, prosecutors pointed to those admissions as damning proof of guilt, dismissing the defendant's history of mental illness.
 

There was one problem: The man convicted in that trial, Douglas Warney, was innocent, the confession a product of his own mental instability and interrogators' apparent zeal. [via @AP]

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The law says confessions must be voluntary. But without a record of the full interrogation, it is hard to know whether investigators coerced a suspect, said Richard Leo, a professor of law and social psychology at the University of San Francisco.
 

Such a recording also can show whether investigators may have contaminated a confession by either purposely or inadvertently feeding details of the crime to the suspect, he said.

In a courtroom, jurors often measure a confession against their own certainty that, if they were the accused, they'd never admit to a crime they didn't commit.
 

But "we need to be skeptical about confessions," Leo said. "We can't just assume that they're true. And that's especially the case with somebody with mental illness."


 

University of San Francisco's insight:

Richard A. Leo, PhD, JD, is the Hamill Family Chair in Law and Social Psychology and professor and Dean’s Circle Research Scholar at the University San Francisco School of Law, and a Fellow in the Institute for Legal Research at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law. 
 

Dr. Leo is one of the leading experts in the world on police interrogation practices, the impact of Miranda, psychological coercion, false confessions, and the wrongful conviction of the innocent. Dr. Leo has authored more than 100 articles in leading scientific and legal journals as well as several books, including the multiple award-winning Police Interrogation and American Justice (Harvard University Press, 2008); The Wrong Guys: Murder, False Confessions and the Norfolk Four (The New Press, 2008) with Tom Wells; and, most recently, Confessions of Guilt: From Torture to Miranda and Beyond (Oxford University Press, 2012) with George C. Thomas III. He is currently working on a book that is tentatively entitled, The Innocence Revolution: A Popular History of the American Discovery of the Wrongly Convicted (with Tom Wells).

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Silicon Beat: Venture capitalists report growing confidence in tech market

Silicon Beat: Venture capitalists report growing confidence in tech market | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Silicon Valley venture capitalists are getting more confident about the robust tech scene, their enthusiasm buoyed by the record level of IPOs last year, according to a report released Tuesday.

According to the quarterly Venture Capitalist Confidence Index survey by University of San Francisco professor Mark V. Cannice, VCs surveyed in the fourth quarter last year registered 3.93 on a 5-point scale of confidence. The confidence ranking notched up from the third-quarter reading of 3.89; 5 is the highest market of confidence. The recent confidence reading is also above the 3.72 average over the last 11 years. The increase indicates strong confidence in investment opportunities, the fundraising environment and more successful IPOs this year. [via @siliconbeat]

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The Wall Street Journal: Silicon Valley Venture Capitalists’ Confidence Increases, Study Says

The Wall Street Journal: Silicon Valley Venture Capitalists’ Confidence Increases, Study Says | USF in the News | Scoop.it

At the end of a year with strong investment numbers and near-record exits, the confidence of Silicon Valley and Bay Area venture capitalists improved, according to a new study.


The Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index, conducted by University of San Francisco professor Mark V. Cannice, is a quarterly survey of a few dozen venture capitalists in Silicon Valley and the Bay Area.


In the fourth quarter of 2014, the survey said the confidence of venture capitalists rated 3.93 on a scale where one is the lowest confidence level and five is the highest. In the third quarter of 2014, the confidence rated at 3.89, according to the survey. It still hasn’t returned to levels seen before the financial crisis, however.

University of San Francisco's insight:

This is the Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index® for the fourth quarter of 2014, based on a December 2014 survey of 28 San Francisco Bay Area venture capitalists. It is the 44th consecutive quarterly survey and research report, providing unique quantitative and qualitative trend data and analysis on the confidence of Silicon Valley venture capitalists in the future high-growth entrepreneurial environment.


Mark Cannice, department chair and professor of entrepreneurship and innovation with the University of San Francisco (USF) School of Management, authors the research study each quarter.

This report is unique because:
--it measures and reports the opinions of Silicon Valley venture capitalists in their estimation of the entrepreneurial atmosphere during the next six to 18 months.

--there is no other index of its kind that shares actual "on the record" thoughts of VCs.

--the Bay Area is a huge VC hub, so there is likely no better pool of people to gauge the pulse of the current and upcoming environment.

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KQED: Lessons for the Digital Age From a 500-Year-Old Publishing Revolution

KQED: Lessons for the Digital Age From a 500-Year-Old Publishing Revolution | USF in the News | Scoop.it

For centuries, scientists disseminated their research in journals that large publishers printed and distributed. At the time, that made sense.


But in the Internet age, many scientists are questioning this process. Why shouldn’t they just post articles online, free for everyone to read?


It’s not just scientific publishing that faces change, of course. Digital technology, from e-books to blogs to Twitter, has thrown the whole publishing world into confusion.


Pundits pontificate on the future of the press, and bibliophiles blubber over the future of books. Nothing like this has ever happened before—or has it?


Actually, 500 years ago in Europe, a newfangled thing called “printing” set the stage for major social and scientific upheaval.


The Old New Technology


Johannes Gutenberg and his printing press are well-known to most Western schoolchildren. Less familiar is Albrecht Dürer, an artist, engraver and geometrician whose work influenced much of Europe’s early print culture.


Both men loom large in a new exhibition at the University of San Francisco called ‘Reformations: Dürer & the New Age of Print,’ which will run through February 22 at USF’s Thacher Gallery and Donohue Rare Book Room.


Fourteen students from USF’s new Museum Studies graduate program curated the exhibit, led by professor Kate Lusheck and aided by Glori Simmons, gallery director, and John Hawk, head librarian of Special Collections and University Archives.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Chronicle charity fund wins USF prize

San Francisco Chronicle: Chronicle charity fund wins USF prize | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Chronicle charity fund wins USF prize The Chronicle’s Season of Sharing Fund has been named the winner of the University of San Francisco’s annual California Prize for Service and the Common Good for its “particular concern for the most vulnerable members of society,” the university announced.


The annual charity campaign, which has distributed $100 million to Bay Area residents facing hardships over the past 29 years, will be honored at an April 29 dinner at the university. “We are proud to honor the Season of Sharing Fund as an exemplary organization in hopes that the public will renew and expand its support of this great institution of good work,” said USF President Paul Fitzgerald.


Chronicle Publisher Jeffrey Johnson (photo above) said the newspaper was “deeply honored” to be named recipient and praised the thousands of Chronicle readers who have contributed to the fund. [via @sfchronicle]

University of San Francisco's insight:

For information about the University of San Francisco California Prize for Service and the Common Good, or for details about the April 29 dinner, go to www.usfca.edu/ca_prize/.

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Catholic SF: Jesuits minister to the world’s poor and forgotten

Catholic SF: Jesuits minister to the world’s poor and forgotten | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Society of Jesus, known as the Jesuits, first came to the San Francisco archdiocese in 1849 when Father Michael Accolti, SJ, and Father John Nobili, SJ, sailed on the lumber ship “O.C. Raymond” from Oregon to San Francisco, disembarking Dec. 8 on the feast of the Immaculate Conception, not in search of gold but of a chance, as Accolti wrote, “to do a little good.”

What they found, however, was a wild Barbary Coast San Francisco. These men persevered, and when Accolti left for Rome to gather new recruits, Nobili, at the request of Archbishop Alemany, founded Santa Clara College in 1851 in the heart of what is now Silicon Valley. Fellow Turinese Jesuit Father Anthony Maraschi, SJ, founded St. Ignatius Parish and College in 1855 amid the sand dunes of San Francisco’s Market Street. This one school would later become both the University of San Francisco and St. Ignatius College Preparatory.

One of the first teachers at the college was Joseph Neri, SJ, an early experimenter in electricity. He built and perfected his own electrical lighting system to use during his lectures and built San Francisco’s first storage battery. He shined the first electric light on San Francisco from the window of his classroom in 1871 and lit Market Street five years later with a carbon arc for the nation’s centennial celebration.

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