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SinoVision: USF Accepts Gaokao Exam

SinoVision: USF Accepts Gaokao Exam | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In May, the University of San Francisco announced that Chinese students can submit applications directly to the school entrance examination scores. USF joins Illinois Institute of Technology and Brigham Young University, to recognize the Gaokao examination scores. SinoVision reporter Jieyu Yan did this interview with the university President Fr. Paul Fitzgerald, S.J.

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KTVU-TV News: USF Politics Prof James Taylor on Mike Huckabee

KTVU's Ken Pritchett turns to USF Politics Professor James L. Taylor for commentary and analysis on Mike Huckabee's criticism of President Obama's nuclear we...
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The Huffington Post: The Celebration of Alive & Free

The Huffington Post: The Celebration of Alive & Free | USF in the News | Scoop.it

For 28 years Dr. Joe Marshall has been saying and acting on the basis that Black lives, Hispanic lives, young lives on the streets of San Francisco and surrounding communities matter. He is my hero. He should be yours also.


Alive & Free Omega Boys Club was founded in 1987 when public school educators Dr. Joseph Marshall and Jack Jacqua just couldn't handle losing another one of their students to the streets. "Back then something terrible seemed to be happening every day," recalls Marshall. "The drugs, the gangs, the turf and funerals-we had enough of it and we knew something had to be done Alive & Free was 'that something.'"


The Community celebration of Alive & Free's 200th graduate will take place on Sunday, August 2, from 2-5:00 p.m. at the West Bay Conference Center in San Francisco. I plan to be there. I hope others who believe in the extraordinary work of Dr. Joseph Marshall will also be there with me.

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Circle of Blue: Zambia Electricity Shortage Highlights Africa's Hydropower Shortfalls

Circle of Blue: Zambia Electricity Shortage Highlights Africa's Hydropower Shortfalls | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Dwindling water reserves at the hydropower dams that provide nearly all of Zambia’s electricity could force grid operators to cut power supplies by 30 percent to the country’s copper mines, the keystone of its economy. The cuts represent a growing challenge in sub-Saharan Africa to match stagnant electricity supplies with rapid economic growth—a problem many countries are betting on big hydropower projects to solve.

[via @circleofblue]

...

“There’s really a need to come up with some effective solutions to the electricity problem in sub-Saharan Africa,” Heather Hoag, a professor of environmental history at the University of San Francisco and an expert on the history of dam development in Africa, told Circle of Blue. “In that context, dams do seem very promising. The challenge is finding the right project and balancing the winners and losers—and this is about being transparent and taking into account the people who are asked to sacrifice the most: the riverine communities.”

University of San Francisco's insight:

Heather Hoag, Ph.D., Associate Professor (History, Boston University, 2003) specializes in African environmental history with an emphasis in river history, hydropower development, technology, and development planning. Her teaching interests include African history (with a specialization in the colonial period), history of South Africa, environmental history, and food history.

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Wallet Hub: The 2015 Brickyard 400 By The Numbers

Wallet Hub: The 2015 Brickyard 400 By The Numbers | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Held on the hallowed, brick-laden ground of Indianapolis Motor Speedway each July, the Brickyard 400 has long been one of NASCAR’s most-watched races.


We reached out to the following experts for insights into the business of NASCAR, in general, as well as the dynamics of this year’s Brickyard 400, in particular. [via @WalletHub]

...

Daniel A. Rascher

Professor and Director of Academic Programs for the Sport Management Program at University of San Francisco


Which NASCAR race has the best chances of cracking the 50 most-watched sporting events in a given year? Do you think it will happen?
The Daytona 500 for sure. That's the marquee event for NASCAR. The problem, of course, is that it happens at the beginning of the season, not at the end where it could showcase the culmination of the season.

How do NASCAR’s long term prospects for financial viability compare to other major sports?
NASCAR's growth was so phenomenal that now that it has leveled out, people are worried. However, there is nothing to worry about. The sanctioning body, tracks, racing teams, and sponsors are all making enough money to keep doing what they're doing. While the sport might not grow as fast as it had in the past, it is on solid footing.
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Huffington Post: How to Manage Transgender Discrimination in the Workplace

Huffington Post: How to Manage Transgender Discrimination in the Workplace | USF in the News | Scoop.it

For transgender people, this summer has already been one of the most important moments in the community's history. Caitlyn Jenner announced her true identity on the cover of Vanity Fair, and she was shown overwhelming support. At the same time, Schuyler Bailar, a recruit for the women's swimming team at Harvard University, will become the first transgender athlete when he joins the men's team. [via @huffingtonpost]

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As a professor at the University of San Francisco's School of Management, I teach classes on social equity and communication strategies for social justice. Our world is changing so quickly, and managers can't be the same as they were in the 20th century. Through the classroom, I'm hoping to help managers understand how to communicate with transgender people, stop discrimination in the workplace and handle some of the logistical issues like fear over bathroom situations.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Associate Professor Richard Greggory Johnson III is a progressive author, educator and Fulbright Scholar who focuses on social equity and human rights within public policy and administration. His areas of expertise include race, gender, sexual orientation and social class issues, human resources and higher education management.

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The Hindu: A meatless argument

The Hindu: A meatless argument | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The U.S.’s National Public Radio (NPR) recently featured an article entitled “Egg War: Why India’s Vegetarian Elites are Accused of Keeping Kids Hungry.” On the face of it, the concern expressed by the writer was legitimate: the nutritional needs of poor schoolchildren in Madhya Pradesh following the State government’s decision to remove eggs from the menu. But, as the rather judgmental term “vegetarian elites” suggests, the article seems to be more about perpetuating a common misperception in reporting on India, that somehow vegetarianism is an “upper caste” Hindu ploy to make the poor in India starve. After all, just a few days before that, The New York Times addressed the beef ban issue with the headline, “Saving the Cows, Starving the Children”, complete with a photo of a woman offering a pranam to a cow.[via @the_hindu]

...

Vamsee Juluri is a professor of media studies at the University of San Francisco and the author of Rearming Hinduism

University of San Francisco's insight:

Vamsee Juluri received his PhD in Communication from the University of Massachusetts in 1999. His research interest is in the globalization of media audiences with an emphasis on Indian television and cinema, mythology, religion, violence and Gandhian philosophy.

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China Daily USA: Gaokao opens doors to overseas universities

China Daily USA: Gaokao opens doors to overseas universities | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Nearly 40 overseas universities now accept Chinese college entrance exam scores as their admission criteria, state broadcaster CCTV News reported.


It said Chinese students with gaokao test scores can apply to world-class universities in more than 20 countries and regions, including the United States, Australia, Canada and Singapore and secure admission after an interview, bypassing TOEFL and SAT exams.


"We have received over 100 Chinese applications and those who meet the required gaokao score will have the chance to attend face-to-face interviews in early July in Beijing before being admitted to universities in the autumn", a member of staff in the China office of the University of San Francisco was quoted as saying by Chinese news portal The Paper.


"TOEFL and SAT scores can be improved in a short time, but Chinese gaokao can examine students' knowledge base after long-time study," said Stanley [Nel], deputy director of the University of San Francisco. [via @ChinaDailyUSA]

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Contra Costa Times: Governor appoints two new judges in Alameda County

Contra Costa Times: Governor appoints two new judges in Alameda County | USF in the News | Scoop.it

OAKLAND -- Gov. Jerry Brown, D-Oakland, on Thursday appointed a law professor and a court commissioner to judgeships in the Alameda County Superior Court.


Jeffrey S. Brand, 70, of Berkeley, was appointed to fill the vacancy created by Judge Gary Picetti's retirement. He has been a professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law since 1986 and formerly served as dean of the college. A University of California, Berkeley School of Law graduate, he has also served as a California Agricultural Labor Relations Board judge and as a Contra Costa County deputy public defender, and has worked in private practice. [via @CCTimes]


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Beyond Chron: San Francisco Immigrants mourn and organize

Beyond Chron: San Francisco Immigrants mourn and organize | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Over 100 immigrant rights’ supporters assembled on the steps of San Francisco’s City Hall on Tues., July 14. It was a different kind of political event. There were no banners, no list of demands and no loud passionate speeches.

Not on this day.

...

Founder of the Immigrant Legal Resource Center and University of San Francisco law professor Bill Hing told me, “it’s not that difficult.” Obtaining a warrant “is something all law-enforcement agencies know how to do.” [via @beyondchron]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Throughout his career, Professor Bill Ong Hing pursued social justice through a combination of community work, litigation, and scholarship. He is the author of numerous academic and practice-oriented publications on immigration policy and race relations. 

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Los Angeles Times: S.F. immigrant advocates call for 'sober' dialogue in wake of killing

Los Angeles Times: S.F. immigrant advocates call for 'sober' dialogue in wake of killing | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Each speaker reiterated an undisputed fact: The fatal shooting of 32-year-old Kate Steinle on San Francisco's Embarcadero is a tragedy.


They held white carnations in Steinle's name, offering private prayers as they gathered them in a vase.


Beneath the tone of respect was a plea: that officials in this longtime sanctuary city and across the country dial down the rhetoric on immigration enforcement and engage in "sober" dialogue that "protects all communities." [via @latimes]

...

Bill Ong Hing, a professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law who specializes in immigration policy, told the crowd that he has two daughters and was deeply affected by Steinle's shooting.


But, he said, "San Francisco is a safer place now because of the Due Process for All ordinance. It's safer because the immigrant community trusts the police department."

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The Conversation: Is there an Asian 'disadvantage' in higher ed?

The Conversation: Is there an Asian 'disadvantage' in higher ed? | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The subject of quotas for Asian American students in higher education is making news as groups of Asian Americans file lawsuits against Harvard and other elite universities.


These stories suggest that universities are discriminating against Asian American students by holding them to a higher standard. They appear to be supported by research that shows that successful Asian American applicants have higher scores than whites and other racial groups on standardized tests such as SAT and ACT. And as a result, private admissions consultants are advising Asian American students on how to “appear less Asian when they apply” in order to boost their chances of admission to elite universities.


These stories perpetuate stereotypes of Asian Americans as high-achieving model minorities. They also suggest that there is an unspoken quota on the number of Asian American students.

[via @ConversationEDU]



University of San Francisco's insight:

Kevin Kumashiro was appointed as dean of the School of Education in 2013. He is an award-winning author with nine books on anti-oppressive education and activism, including "Troubling Education," recipient of the 2003 Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award, and his most recent, "Bad Teacher!: How Blaming Teachers Distorts the Bigger Picture." He is the founding director of the Center for Anti-Oppressive Education and served as the primary investigator and director of UIC AANAPISI Initiative, funded by $4 million in U.S. Department of Education grants to support Asian American and Pacific Islander students in higher education.

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New York Times: Sheriff in San Francisco Faults Federal Authorities After Killing

New York Times: Sheriff in San Francisco Faults Federal Authorities After Killing | USF in the News | Scoop.it

SAN FRANCISCO — The sheriff of San Francisco, Ross Mirkarimi, is a political veteran who was once a rising star in the city’s most liberal circles, a critic of many tough-on-crime policies who was admired by many of the city’s immigrant-rights activists. [via @NYTimes]

...

When immigrant rights advocates lobbied for the city’s ordinance, called Due Process for All, in 2013, to stop local officials from cooperating with federal immigration agents, Mr. Lee pressed for leeway for law enforcement and eventually reached a compromise with the supervisors. But Sheriff Mirkarimi, who had long opposed working with federal immigration officials, was mostly left out of negotiations because many groups were reluctant to be associated with him, said Bill Hing, a law professor at the University of San Francisco and the founder of the Immigrant Legal Resource Center.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Throughout his career, Professor Bill Ong Hing pursued social justice through a combination of community work, litigation, and scholarship. He is the author of numerous academic and practice-oriented publications on immigration policy and race relations, including Ethical Borders—NAFTA, Globalization, and Mexican Migration (Temple University Press, 2010), Deporting Our Souls-Morality, Values, and Immigration Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2006), Defining America Through Immigration Policy (Temple University Press, 2004), and Making and Remaking Asian America Through Immigration Policy (Stanford University Press, 1993). He was also co-counsel in the precedent-setting U.S. Supreme Court asylum case, INS v. Cardoza-Fonseca (1987). Hing is the founder of the Immigrant Legal Resource Center in San Francisco and continues to volunteer as general counsel for this organization. He serves on the National Advisory Council of the Asian American Justice Center in Washington, D.C.

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The Advocate: Gov. Bobby Jindal TV buy in Iowa part of ‘early state’ strategy

The Advocate: Gov. Bobby Jindal TV buy in Iowa part of ‘early state’ strategy | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In farmhouses, suburban split-levels and studio apartments across Iowa, the image of Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal shimmers on television screens as he talks up his belief in an America where ethnic identities dissolve in the melting pot of assimilation.



“I am tired of hyphenated Americans,” Jindal, the U.S.-born child of immigrants from India, says in the ad. “We’re not Indian-Americans or African-Americans or Asian-Americans. We’re all Americans.”

As Jindal, 44, campaigns for the 2016 Republican nomination for president, the 30-second TV spot aims to raise his profile among Republican voters in Iowa, who will caucus Feb. 1 to start the official nomination process.


“He’s obviously putting his eggs in the Iowa basket, both in terms of investment of his time and investment of his resources in a place that he needs to break out in,” said Kenneth Goldstein, a political scientist at the University of San Francisco and a co-author of the 2007 book, “Campaign Advertising and American Democracy.” [via @theadvocatebr]




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China Daily: Chinese doing business in the U.S. need to do their homework

China Daily: Chinese doing business in the U.S. need to do their homework | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Chinese companies that do - or want to do - business in the U.S. can benefit with a little friendly reminder: assimilation and adaptation to the local business culture is critical. You could even call it the "make or break" rule.


At a seminar on Friday at Stanford University, a dozen or so Chinese businessmen were bombarded over and over again with the same word - localization - by a panel of government officials, scholars and industry insiders.


"I don't want to exaggerate the importance of localization," said moderator Stanley Kwong, who teaches globalization strategies at the School of Management at the University of San Francisco, "but as soon as you set foot on American soil, you have to learn to survive and thrive in an alien business culture."


The world's two largest economies remain active in a wide-spectrum of exchange and communication. In 2013, for the first time China's investment in the U.S., $14 billion, outpaced U.S. investment into China. America received $12 billion in investment from China in 2014, still enough to make the U.S. the No 1 destination country for Chinese outward investment. [via @ChinaDailyUSA]

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Los Angeles Times: Sanctuary cities: How Kathryn Steinle's death intensified the immigration debate

Los Angeles Times: Sanctuary cities: How Kathryn Steinle's death intensified the immigration debate | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The death of Kathryn Steinle, who was fatally shot on July 1 while strolling on San Francisco's Embarcadero, was a tragedy. And when the suspect was revealed to be a Mexican national with a criminal record who had been deported several times, it became a flash point in the long-divisive political debate about how to reform the nation's immigration system.

[via @latimes]

...

Bill Ong Hing, a professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law who specializes in immigration policy, said July 14 that he felt the loss of Steinle, having two daughters himself. But, he said, "San Francisco is a safer place now because of the Due Process for All ordinance. It's safer because the immigrant community trusts the Police Department."

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Bloomberg Politics: The Polling Paradox - How to Read the Numbers

Bloomberg Politics: The Polling Paradox - How to Read the Numbers | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Do you believe, as the ABC News/Washington Post poll showed this week, that Hillary Clinton is beating Jeb Bush nationally by a margin of 10 percentage points (51 percent to 41 percent)?


Do you believe, as the Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday on a set of battleground states showed, that Bush as well as Marco Rubio and Scott Walker are besting Clinton by 5 percentage points in Colorado, 6 percentage points in Iowa, and 3 percentage points in Virginia?


Both can't be true. [via @bpolitics]

...

Ken Goldstein is professor of politics at the University of San Francisco and is Bloomberg Politics' polling and political advertising analyst.



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Oxford University Press: Who was Max Planck?

Brandon Brown, author of Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken by War, describes why many people know very little about Max Planck, in spite of the fact that he was a very important physicist. Planck’s theories of how matter, light, and energy work are still in use today, but much about his life and work is relatively unknown—especially in America. http://global.oup.com/academic/produc...

Brandon R. Brown is a Professor of Physics at the University of San Francisco. His biophysics work on the electric sense of sharks, as covered by NPR and the BBC, has appeared in Nature, The Physical Review, and other research journals. His writing for general audiences has appeared in New Scientist, SEED, the Huffington Post, and other outlets. [via @OUPAcademic]

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San Francisco Chronicle: USF’s Azzi gets contract extension

San Francisco Chronicle: USF’s Azzi gets contract extension | USF in the News | Scoop.it

USF has agreed to a five-year contract extension with women’s basketball coach Jennifer Azzi that goes through the 2019-20 season. Financial terms were not disclosed.

Azzi, a four-year starter at Stanford and the first Cardinal woman to be named the James Naismith Player of the Year, has coached the Dons since the 2010-11 season. Last year was her first winning season, the Dons finishing 19-14 and playing in the Women’s NIT. It was the Dons’ first postseason appearance since 2002. [via @sfchronicle]

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The Guardian: San Francisco sheriff's deputies union sues department over sanctuary policy

The Guardian: San Francisco sheriff's deputies union sues department over sanctuary policy | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The San Francisco sheriff’s deputies union this week filed a complaint against its own department, over a March memo that emphasised a “sanctuary policy” prohibiting deputies from passing information on arrested individuals to immigration agencies. [via @guardian]

...

Other observers, such as University of San Francisco law professor Bill Hing, say those criticising sanctuary policies fail to understand the bigger picture.


“Most undocumented persons did not enter [the US] illegally,” Hing said.


Regarding the sanctuary policies enacted by more than 250 municipalities across the US, Hing said: “It all goes back to the purpose of the ordinances – [helping] the immigrant community to trust the police.”


Without sanctuary policies, Hing argued, “if every time they are talked to by police they are at risk of being deported, why should they cooperate?”


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Fortune Magazine: Is there an Asian quota in the Ivy League?

Fortune Magazine: Is there an Asian quota in the Ivy League? | USF in the News | Scoop.it

By Stacey Lee and Kevin K. Kumashiro


The subject of quotas for Asian American students in higher education is making news as groups of Asian Americans file lawsuits against Harvard and other elite universities.


These stories suggest that universities are discriminating against Asian American students by holding them to a higher standard. They appear to be supported by research that shows that successful Asian American applicants have higher scores than whites and other racial groups on standardized tests such as SAT and ACT.And as a result, private admissions consultantsare advising Asian American students on how to “appear less Asian when they apply” in order to boost their chances of admission to elite universities.

These stories perpetuate stereotypes of Asian Americans as high-achieving model minorities. They also suggest that there is an unspoken quota on the number of Asian American students. [via @FortuneMagazine]

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Cape Talk: These are the most valuable sports teams in South Africa

Cape Talk: These are the most valuable sports teams in South Africa | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Real Madrid is the most valuable sports team in the world.


Which are the most valuable ones in South Africa?


We interviewed Michael Goldman, Assistant Professor at the Sport Management Program at the University of San Francisco and Adjunct Faculty at the Gordon Institute of Business. [via @CapeTalk]



University of San Francisco's insight:

Michael Goldman is an Assistant Professor in the Sport Management Program at the University of San Francisco. Through his teaching, research and consulting activities in the business of sport, Michael has worked with leading soccer, rugby, and cricket sponsors, rights-holders, broadcasters and agencies in South Africa and Kenya. He is a regular media contributor on sport marketing issues and has published academically in the US, Europe and Africa.

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US News & World Report: U.S. Universities That Attract the Most International Students

US News & World Report: U.S. Universities That Attract the Most International Students | USF in the News | Scoop.it

At each of these 11 schools, more than 16 percent of the student body is international. [via @usnews]

...

7. University of San Francisco (tie)

Percentage of international students: 18 percent

Total undergraduate enrollment: 6,392

U.S. News rank: 106 (tie)

More about University of San Francisco.

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Orange County Register: 'Muck' to teach art in prisons

Orange County Register: 'Muck' to teach art in prisons | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Muckenthaler Cultural Center will once again provide arts instruction to inmates in state correctional facilities.


The Muckenthaler is among 10 organizations that are conducting art programs in 18 prisons in the second of a two-year pilot program, Arts in Corrections.


The California Arts Council, a state agency, is providing $2.5 million to fund the program. [via @ocregister]

...

“The desire to create, to be creative, is inherent in all of us,” wrote Larry Brewster, a public administration professor at the University of San Francisco, in a 2012 study on arts programs in four prisons. “Talent is less important than the desire to do something, anything, well.”



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National Public Radio (NPR): Why We Play Sports: Winning Motivates, But Can Backfire, Too

National Public Radio (NPR): Why We Play Sports: Winning Motivates, But Can Backfire, Too | USF in the News | Scoop.it

A recent poll NPR did with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that a solid majority of adults in the U.S. who play sports — 56 percent — say that winning is important to them, too. Fifty-four percent of adults who play sports say they always or often push themselves to their physical limits, and 85 percent say their performance is important to them.


Plus, victory in sport is just plain fun, says George Gmelch, an anthropologist at the University of San Francisco and at Union College, in Schenectady, N.Y. Gmelch studies sports culture, and played professional baseball in the minor leagues himself.


Even watching your team win feels good, Gmelch says; imagine how great people feel when "they've contributed to the team's success." But interestingly, he says, as we get older that need to compete and win in the sports we play seems to wane. [via @NPR]
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