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San Jose Mercury News: USF to inaugurate its new president, the Rev. Paul J. Fitzgerald

San Jose Mercury News: USF to inaugurate its new president, the Rev. Paul J. Fitzgerald | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The University of San Francisco will inaugurate its 28th president, the Rev. Paul J. Fitzgerald, on Saturday.


The morning ceremony honoring Fitzgerald will include House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom, former San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown, University of California President Janet Napolitano and the Rev. Robert W. McElroy, auxiliary bishop of San Francisco.


Fitzgerald, a Jesuit priest who speaks three languages and has held teaching posts in China and Kenya, was appointed in April and took office in August, leaving his academic affairs post at Fairfield University in Connecticut.


He grew up in Los Gatos, studied history at Santa Clara University -- where he later was a dean -- and in 1992 was ordained at USF's St. Ignatius Church, the site of the inauguration ceremony.


Fitzgerald succeeds the Rev. Stephen A. Privett, also a Jesuit, who led the Catholic university for 14 years. [via @mercnews]

University of San Francisco's insight:

WHAT: The trustees and leadership team of the University of San Francisco (USF) will officially swear in the Rev. Paul J. Fitzgerald, S.J. as USF's 28th president during the inauguration ceremony on November 1, 2014.


The event will include an academic procession featuring representatives of universities from around the world, as well as local, state, and national dignitaries. 


WHEN: 10 a.m. on Saturday, November 1, 2014.


WHERE: The ceremony will take place in the historic St. Ignatius Church on the USF campus (650 Parker Avenue at Fulton Street).


More information: https://www.usfca.edu/inauguration/

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New York Times: For Marijuana, a Second Wave of Votes to Legalize

New York Times: For Marijuana, a Second Wave of Votes to Legalize | USF in the News | Scoop.it

KEIZER, Ore. — Two years after voters in Colorado and Washington State broke the ice as the first states to legalize sales of recreational marijuana to adults, residents of Oregon, Alaska and Washington, D.C., will vote next week on ballot measures patterned on those of the two pioneers. People on both sides of the issue say these initiatives could determine whether there will be a national tide of legalization.


A changing political landscape has weakened anti-marijuana efforts. As the libertarian movement in the Republican Party has gained force, with leaders like Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky, supporting decriminalization of marijuana and others going even further, an anchor of the conservative opposition to legalization has eroded.


“The support coalition is definitely broader, and the opposition has splintered,” said Corey Cook, an associate professor of politics at the University of San Francisco who follows the marijuana debate.

[via @nytimes]

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Wall Street Journal: Startup Valuations Are ‘Running a Little Warm’

Wall Street Journal: Startup Valuations Are ‘Running a Little Warm’ | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Marc Andreessen said valuations for startup companies are “running a little warm,” but may reflect a view that Internet technologies can generate more successful companies.


During a discussion about venture-capital investing at the WSJD Live global technology conference Tuesday in Laguna Beach, Calif., the co-founder of venture firm Andreessen Horowitz said he is evaluating whether or not the increasing amount of venture capital being pumped into startups at growing valuations is resulting in more “home run” companies.

...

“The question would be, ‘Is that 15 number in the process of going up?’ ” he said. “You can make an argument that says there are going to be 20 to 30 or 50, in which case there should be a significant ramp in venture capital.”


On the other hand, Andreessen said, “You can also say, there they go again—hubris.”

...

quarterly survey of venture capitalists released earlier in October by Mark Cannice, a professor at the University of San Francisco, showed the first decline in VC confidence in two years.


Andreessen echoed his earlier concerns in the interview Tuesday, saying that the rate at which startups are burning cash is “getting out of hand.” [via @WSJ]

University of San Francisco's insight:

The University of San Francisco survey, which was conducted in September, is based on the responses of 33 venture capitalists in the San Francisco Bay area, including those who work at Menlo Ventures and Qualcomm Ventures.

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Bloomberg: The West Coast's Topsy-Turvy House Races

Bloomberg: The West Coast's Topsy-Turvy House Races | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In a solidly conservative district that Mitt Romney won in 2012 with 60 percent of the vote, a Republican candidate is attacking his opponent for being too conservative. In another district that shades red, a Republican is attacking his opponent for not taking a strong stand against the Confederate flag.


Is this a campaign bizarro world? No, it’s just life under a “top-two” voting system, where candidates from the same party can end up in head-to-head match-ups. Three states -- California, Louisiana and Washington -- have adopted top-two systems. Each is slightly different from the others, but here's how they generally work:


All candidates appear on the ballot in an election open to all voters. The top-two finishers -- regardless of their party affiliation -- advance to a runoff. In districts where one party is particularly weak, it’s not uncommon for the top two candidates to be of the same party. That’s part of the idea: top-two systems help create intra-party competition where no meaningful inter-party competition exists. [via @BV]

...

Ken Goldstein, a professor of politics at the University of San Francisco, explains the dynamic this way: “most incumbents worry about being attacked in the primary for not being pure enough.” But a top-two system “sets up a situation where they can be attacked from their own side for being too pure.”

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KPCC, Southern California's NPR: Oakland reserves right to evict suspected prostitutes

KPCC, Southern California's NPR: Oakland reserves right to evict suspected prostitutes | USF in the News | Scoop.it

A little over a decade ago, the city of Oakland launched the Nuisance Eviction Ordinance--a law that gave the city the right to pursue eviction proceedings on renters based on drug or weapon charges. The new legislation was modeled after a pilot program adopted seven years prior by Los Angeles, which allowed the City Attorney to evict for arrests and illegal weapon possession. This past Wednesday the Oakland City Council unanimously approved a series of new laws proposed by City Attorney Barbara Parker, including one giving her--as well as landlords--the right to swiftly evict suspected sex workers.


While the reasoning behind the new ordinance may seem well-founded, critics worry that the new law--much like similar laws passed before it--neglects due process, lacks transparency and oversight and carries with it few protections for parties who have been wrongly evicted. Kriston Capps, who broke the story for CityLab, writes, “The bill does not describe the burden of proof the city needs to meet in order to apprise a landlord that a tenant has ‘engaged’ in an illegal activity. Nor does the bill stipulate whether this evidence (presuming some is required) is to be shared with the tenant.” [via @KPCC]

...

Tim Iglesias, Professor of Law at the University of San Francisco School of Law (specializing in fair housing), was a guest on this radio program providing legal and academic commentary. 

University of San Francisco's insight:

Professor Tim Iglesias, an expert in housing and property law, has served on the USF law faculty since 2001. He co-edited The Legal Guide to Affordable Housing Development Law (American Bar Association, 2011). He has published several articles on affordable housing and fair housing law, including “Our Pluralist Housing Ethics and the Struggle for Affordability” (Wake Forest Law Review, 2007) and “Beyond Two-Persons-Per-Bedroom: Revitalizing Application of the Federal Fair Housing Act to Private Residential Occupancy Standards” (Georgia State Law Review, 2012). He is a frequent speaker and media commentator on housing issues.


Iglesias earned his Juris Doctor from Stanford University Law School with distinction in 1993, after receiving a bachelor's degree and an honorary master's from Oxford University, and graduating with a bachelor's degree from Loyola Marymount, magna cum laude.

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San Francisco Chronicle: California candidates pour on negative ads as election nears

San Francisco Chronicle: California candidates pour on negative ads as election nears | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Neel Kashkari saves a drowning boy from Gov. Jerry Brown’s neglect. San Jose Rep. Mike Honda charges fellow Democrat Ro Khanna with being bought and paid for by GOP-leaning special interests. Republican Ron Nehring accuses Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom of promoting drug addiction among women.


As the Nov. 4 election nears, the TV, radio and mail ads are getting tougher, with candidates throwing out charges by the basketload and daring their opponents to deny them. [via @sfchronicle]

...

Changes in voting behavior, particularly the growing popularity of vote-by-mail ballots, haven’t been reflected in the timing and content of political ads, said Ken Goldstein, a professor of politics at the University of San Francisco.


Even though 69 percent of voters cast ballots at the mailbox in the June primary, with many voting in early October, campaigns still are trying to squirrel away money for the traditional late pre-election push, he said.


Campaigns “still are spending a lot of money in the last two weeks, when few people are undecided,” Goldstein said. But even a small number of undecided voters may mean the difference between victory and defeat, so the ads will continue until the polls close.

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Bloomberg News: Venture Capital Confidence Drops as Market Fluctuates

Bloomberg News: Venture Capital Confidence Drops as Market Fluctuates | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Silicon Valley venture capitalists’ confidence declined for the first time in two years, amid sky-high valuations for startups and a spate of delayed initial public offerings, according to a new survey.


Venture capitalists’ confidence fell to 3.89 on a 5-point scale in the third quarter, down from 4.02 in the prior quarter, according to the Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index, which is compiled by the University of San Francisco. It was the first drop since early 2012, said Professor Mark Cannice, who manages the index.


There’s “increasing concern about the future of the IPO exit market” as the stock market has fluctuated recently, Cannice said in an interview. [via @BloombergNews]

...

The University of San Francisco survey, which was conducted in September, is based on the responses of 33 venture capitalists in the San Francisco Bay area, including those who work at Menlo Ventures and Qualcomm Ventures.


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Christian Science Monitor: Ebola and the politics of fear

Christian Science Monitor: Ebola and the politics of fear | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Rhetoric aimed at frightening voters is a time-honored technique. President Johnson had his “Daisy Girl” nuclear ad. President Reagan had a “bear in the woods,” a symbol of the Soviet Union.  The second President Bush used wolves as a post-9/11 metaphor for lurking terrorists. 


This campaign season, it’s the arrival of Ebola in the United States that has ramped up fear, handing politicians an arresting new talking point. Republicans accuse the Obama administration of incompetence. Democrats say GOP budget-cutting has hampered the government response. In one of the few TV ads focused on Ebola, the liberal Agenda Project uses graphic images from West Africa, interspersed with Republican politicians saying “cut.”

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As much as voters say they dislike “negative ads” – whether the ads are peddling anger or fear or other forms of negativity – political strategists swear by them as turnout tools.  There’s academic evidence that shows negative advertising can mobilize voters, as well as evidence that emotion is key, says Ken Goldstein, an expert on campaign advertising and a political scientist at the University of San Francisco.


“People are more likely to take into account fear than hope in casting a ballot,” says Mr. Goldstein.

[via @csmonitor]

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Eyewitness News Johannesburg: 'Oscar's career is over'

Eyewitness News Johannesburg: 'Oscar's career is over' | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Assistant Professor for the Sport Management Programme at the University of San Francisco, Michael Goldman, says convicted killer Oscar Pistorius’s career is over.

Goldman told the Money Show that the Paralympian and Olympian athlete’s days of competing on the track are gone.

The blade runner was today sentenced to five years in prison for the Valentine’s Day shooting and killing of his girlfriend model Reeva Steenkamp.

Judge Thokozile Masipa
 sentenced the athlete to five years for culpable homicide for killing Steenkamp, and three years, wholly suspended, for the shooting incident at Tasha's in Melrose Arch.

Goldman said, “From a career of running and being a brand endorser to the right opportunity of redemption, there’s an opportunity of a talking and writing career when he comes out of jail and during the house arrest time.”

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San Jose Mercury News: Honda launches attack ad as new poll shows dead heat with Khanna

San Jose Mercury News: Honda launches attack ad as new poll shows dead heat with Khanna | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Democrat Ro Khanna appears finally to be gaining ground in his closely-watched race against Rep. Mike Honda, with a new poll showing a dead heat and Honda attacking his challenger for the first time in a television ad.


The Honda ad, launched Monday, claims Khanna is backed by right-wing billionaires, favors tax breaks for rich people and isn't committed to protecting Social Security.


Khanna emailed supporters Monday to say the ad is "full of lies," but he lacks the money to air a rebuttal. His campaign had less than $100,000 left to spend as of Sept. 30, while the seven-term incumbent had close to $1 million banked for the final weeks of the bruising battle between the two Democrats for the 17th Congressional District seat, recent reports show. [via @mercnews]

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"It's not just the poll -- the fact that the incumbent is running an ad hard against his challenger indicates he thinks the race is close," said Corey Cook, who directs the University of San Francisco's Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good. "Honda's campaign thinks if they can persuade Democratic voters to stay with the 'more Democratic' candidate, they're going to be successful. It's a clear 'campaign to the base' kind of move."


Cook said the ad comes a bit late, given that vote-by-mail ballots have been in the field for two weeks already, and up to two-thirds of all voters are expected to use them. "But in a close race, it can certainly make a difference if the charges go unanswered."

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San Jose Mercury News: USF's annual Hilltop Cup Boxing Tournament

San Jose Mercury News: USF's annual Hilltop Cup Boxing Tournament | USF in the News | Scoop.it
The University of San Francisco held its 11th annual Hilltop Cup Boxing Tournament at USF’s Hagan Gym in San Francisco, Calif., on Friday, Oct. 17, 2014. The tournament presented 14 amateur fights in different weight divisions from various colleges across the state such as USF, UCLA, UC Davis, USC, Cal State Northridge, CSULA and other Bay Area boxing gyms. USF boxing team competed in seven bouts, four victories and three losses. (Photos by Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group)
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Marketplace: Cable eclipsing broadcast for political advertising

Marketplace: Cable eclipsing broadcast for political advertising | USF in the News | Scoop.it

If you live in a state with a close race in this year's midterm elections, you know that candidates are carpet bombing the air waves with TV ads. But candidates and campaigns are increasingly airing their ads over cable instead of their local broadcast station, for a bunch of reasons, some specific to this year.   


“There’s just not a lot of competitive House races," says Ken Goldstein, a professor of political science at the University of San Francisco. "We’re sort of in a dead-ball year, in terms of House races.”


And the House races that are close are in big cities, where it’s not efficient to advertise on local TV. Plus, there aren’t as many competitive races for governor, and those are mostly fought on local airwaves. 

But long-term trends also give cable an edge over local TV.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Bay Area schools scramble for qualified teachers amid shortage

San Francisco Chronicle: Bay Area schools scramble for qualified teachers amid shortage | USF in the News | Scoop.it

A long-predicted teacher shortage has hit several Bay Area school districts this year, resulting in stiff competition for qualified candidates and more classrooms in the hands of temporary or emergency teachers who lack full credentials.

A combination of teacher retirements, high attrition rates, lack of new recruits and increased competition among districts in a postrecession economy has flip-flopped the education job market, school officials say.

“It’s become an employees’ market versus an employers’ market,” said Scott Gaiber, San Francisco Unified director of certificated staffing and recruitment. “There is a lot more competition for talent.”

Fewer people want to be teachers now, and that’s a big part of the problem. In 2008, there were almost 45,000 people enrolled in teacher preparation programs in California. By 2013, there were fewer than 20,000, according to the state Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

...

Francisco Figueroa-Yanez teaches his first science class of the day at James Lick Middle School in San Francisco on Friday, Oct. 10, 2014. Figueroa-Yanez received Bachelors degrees in Biology and Spanish before moving onto a masters program at USF. Figueroa-Yanez is in the San Francisco Teacher Residency (SFTR) program.  SFTR is a partnership between SFUSD, USF, the UESF, and Stanford University to recruit and prepare teachers to work with the highest need students in San Francisco. 

[@sfchronicle]


University of San Francisco's insight:

San Francisco Teacher Residency (SFTR) is a partnership committed to preparing high quality teachers for San Francisco's hardest to staff schools and subjects. It is designed to train aspiring teachers who are committed to teaching in urban public schools in math, science, and Spanish bilingual literacy. When SFTR graduates become the teachers of record, they will have gained valuable teaching experience, an understanding of the challenges ahead, and an ever-expanding network of fellow educators to lean on for support and advice.

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Race for the Cure shouldn’t accept money from gas drillers

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Race for the Cure shouldn’t accept money from gas drillers | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Susan G Komen breast cancer organization, known for its Race for the Cure, at Sunday’s Steelers game accepted a sizable donation from Baker Hughes Inc., an oil- and gas-field service company heavily engaged in fracking. The company also is distributing 1,000 pink drill bits around the world.


Here’s a news flash for the Komen organization: Carcinogens cause cancer. Pinking up an industry’s tools does not detoxify the industry.


Komen’s identification with an industry that uses millions of gallons of water laced with toxic chemicals, many of which are known or suspected carcinogens, in the production of oil and natural gas and then calls it “clean energy” is insulting to the women and families who have supported Komen and its associated fundraisers — and to the women who have or will have a diagnosis of breast cancer, which is one in every eight women in the United States. [via @PittsburghPG]

...

Barbara Sattler is a registered nurse and professor in the Public Health Program of the University of San Francisco (bsattler@usfca.edu).

University of San Francisco's insight:

Barbara Sattler, RN, DrPH, FAAN


Education
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Public Health 1990 School of Public Health Oc/Env Health
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Public Health 1982 School of Hygiene and Public Health
University of Baltimore, MD Political Science 1980
Pilgrim State Hosp School of Nursing Nursing 1975


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San Francisco Chronicle: USF men look to build on last season’s success

San Francisco Chronicle: USF men look to build on last season’s success | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Looking at the preseason poll of WCC head coaches, you’d surmise that the conference appears ready for yet another round of the Big Three and everyone else.


Revealed at the WCC’s annual Media Day event at the Time Warner Cable Sports studios Monday, the poll lists the usual suspects at the top: Gonzaga, BYU and St.Mary’s, in that order.


USF is slotted fourth. Don’t forget, though, that the Dons tied for second with the Cougars last season, two games behind the Zags, and two games ahead of the fourth-place Gaels.


Rex Walters hasn’t forgotten.


“We should feel like we can compete with the best teams in our league — and beat them,” the USF head coach said. “It’s a heck of a task. … We want to take that next step and prove that second place last year wasn’t a fluke.”


The Dons put together a six-game winning streak late last season. In that stretch, they snapped a losing streak to St.Mary’s that had reached 17 games. USF received an NIT berth for the first time since 2005. [via @sfchronicle]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Rex Walters continues to put his stamp on one of college basketball’s most storied programs. In six seasons on the Hilltop, the former Kansas standout has guided the Dons to a 98-94 record, three postseason appearances and a pair of 20-win seasons. His career record, which includes two seasons at Florida Atlantic, stands at 129-127.


For his efforts, Walters was named the WCC’s Coach of the Year in a vote of his peers, becoming the first USF coach to win the award since Pete Barry in 1980-81. Last season’s success continued an upward trend for USF’s program under Walters. After posting a combined 23-37 record over his first two seasons, Walters has guided the Dons to a 75-57 record over the last four campaigns, including a 38-26 mark in WCC play. Included among his win total are three victories over perennial conference power Gonzaga.

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The Economist: Putting the boot in development

The Economist: Putting the boot in development | USF in the News | Scoop.it

I’VE STUMBLED across an interesting paper, which looks at the economic impact of TOMS Shoes. When you buy a pair of TOMS, they give another pair to an impoverished child. TOMS has come under a fair amount of criticism for what it does, including a bombastic Marxist take from Slavoj Žižek, a Slovenian philosopher.


Economists have also waded in to the debate. Dambisa Moyo, one economist, suggests that aid can end up replacing local markets, thereby hindering development. Another looked at used-clothes imports to Africa and concluded that they provoked a depression in local apparel industries. The latest paper, which looks at TOMS shoes, gives further succour to the naysayers.


The authors, all from the University of San Francisco, focus on the effect of TOMS donations of children's shoes on local shoe markets. They look at the results from a randomised control trial with about 1,000 households in El Salvador, a country that consistently comes in the bottom half of income-per-capita tables.


Now, the results. In the abstract, the authors modestly report that “find no statistically significant difference in...shoe purchases between treatment and control households.” In other words, it seems, TOMS shoes had no effect on local markets. [via @TheEconomist]

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Contra Costa Times: Bay Area cities ready for another round of ranked-choice voting

Contra Costa Times: Bay Area cities ready for another round of ranked-choice voting | USF in the News | Scoop.it

It might be difficult to understand how ranked-choice voting works, but it's crystal clear that its reputation nose-dived after debuting in Oakland four years ago -- and that it still hasn't recovered.


In the decade after the disputed 2000 presidential election, 17 mostly left-leaning cities and counties -- including San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley and San Leandro -- adopted the system that, had it been used in Florida, would have let people vote for Ralph Nader but elect Al Gore by making him their second choice.


That momentum came to a halt after Jean Quan's upset victory in the 2010 Oakland mayor's race. Not a single jurisdiction has adopted ranked-choice voting since Quan, powered by many second- and third-place votes, was declared the winner over former state Sen. Don Perata nearly 72 hours after initial election returns showed Perata with a 9-point lead in first-place votes. [via @CCTimes]

...

For all the complaints about the system being too complicated, it turns out that voters had an easier time with ranked-choice voting than they had with the new statewide nonpartisan primaries, said Corey Cook, who studies elections as director of the Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good at the University of San Francisco.


Perhaps surprisingly, Cook found that voters in Oakland's much-maligned 2010 mayoral race filled out all three choices in significantly larger numbers than in earlier ranked-choice elections held in San Francisco.


That played a big part in Quan getting elected despite badly losing the first-place vote. "She was on more ballots than Perata and she was ahead of him on more ballots," Cook said. "It was a totally legitimate outcome."


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7x7 Magazine: Everything You Need to Know About Body Composition Analysis at USF

7x7 Magazine: Everything You Need to Know About Body Composition Analysis at USF | USF in the News | Scoop.it

It's time for some real talk. Ready? The scale is not your friend. All it's telling you (that is, assuming that thing on your bathroom floor is actually accurate, which is dubious) is the downward force your body commands. It can't tell you how good your arms will look in a tank top, how tapered your waist appears in jeans, or if your need to rethink that pencil skirt. We need to liberate ourselves from the scale's evil, useless tyranny — but let's be realistic, we still need to be able to track our fitness progress, somehow, right? That's where body composition testing comes in.


There are several accepted methods that can be used to determine not just how much of your body is muscle, fat, and bone, but where on your body that stuff is distributed. Some people swear by the classic caliper method, where multiple parts of your body get pinched and measured. Others prefer the Bod Pod, a seated coffin-looking thing that uses air displacement plethysmography. Still others prefer hydrostatic weighing, in which you're submerged in a tank of water and the level of liquid displacement is used to calculate your composition. There's also bioelectrical impedance analysis, which makes a calculation based on how your body's tissues speed up or slow down the flow of a small, harmless electrical signal. 


You'll be reading about all these methods in this column eventually, but we're going to start with bioelectrical impedance. Candidly, it seemed the least scary (no sealed space, water, or stranger pinching me with calipers) and, according to several trainers at my gym, it's condidered fairly reliable. (That is, unless it tells me something I don't want to hear. Then, it's garbage!)


"Typically people get body comp analysis for one of two reasons," says Shanie Chambers, fitness/wellness director at the University of San Francisco's Koret Health & Recreation Center. They're either "starting a new fitness routine and want a baseline to document body composition changes" or they "simply want a number more accurate than a scale to determine fitness level." 


At USF you can get a four-electrode (that is, charges go through your feet and hands) measurement, which is far preferable to the two-electrode (feet only) measurement you might have seen at a health-care focused booth at a street fair or festival. 


Speaking of accuracy, Chambers says that you're not supposed to eat or drink for three hours before the test, which should be done under "normal hydration conditions" (i.e., as Chambers puts it, "not after running a marathon or enjoying an all-you-can-eat buffet"). Ladies also should not take the test while they're mensturating, as that can skew results.


The test itself is simple, and took less time than the walk to the testing area itself, a small room in the bowels of USF's Koret Center. Once in the room, Melissa, an impressively fit USF student and Koret trainer, made sure I'd used the restroom (they want you "empty" for the test), handed me a towelette to wipe down my feet (the test must be taken barefoot), and entered my age and height into the Tanita BC-418 Segmental Body Composition Analyzer.


Like a lamb to the slaughter, I then stood on a set of electrodes, two more in my hands, as a charge was sent through my body. I did not die.

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Silicon Valley Business Journal: VC confidence drops for first time in 2 years

Silicon Valley Business Journal: VC confidence drops for first time in 2 years | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Confidence among Silicon Valley venture capital investors dropped for the first time in two year in the third quarter, according to a new survey.


The report from the University of San Francisco is the latest sign of nervousness among VCs as startup valuations hit the roof and a growing number of IPOs are underperforming or being delayed. [via @SVbizjournal]

...

The survey managed by Prof. Mark Cannice asked 33 VCs in the region to rank their confidence on a five-point scale, with one being low and five being high.


The third quarter index came in at 3.89, which is still relatively high, but is down from the 4.02 registered in the second quarter. It is the first drop recorded since early 2012.


"The break in the upward trend could indicate slowing momentum going forward as the VC confidence reading is future oriented," Cannice wrote in his report.

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Wall Street Journal: Venture Capitalists’ Confidence Is Waning — or So It Seems

Wall Street Journal: Venture Capitalists’ Confidence Is Waning — or So It Seems | USF in the News | Scoop.it

A quarterly survey that gauges the confidence level in Silicon Valley shows that venture capitalists downgraded their enthusiasm in the third quarter. But that doesn’t necessarily mean the Bay Area’s big-spending climate is about to change.


Prof. Mark Cannice of the University of San Francisco asked VCs to estimate their confidence in the area’s entrepreneurial environment over the next six to 18 months. On a five-point scale, with five being the most confident, 33 VCs registered an average of 3.89 — lower than the second-quarter reading of 4.02. The survey, which Cannice conducts each quarter, is hardly scientific and includes only a small sampling of VCs. But it showed the first decline in two years. [via @WSJ]

...

Cannice attributed the decline in sentiment to high valuations and an “overheated” market.


Still, Cannice threw sun on what little dark clouds were gathering over the industry.


“[A] still strong if moderating exit market for venture-backed businesses, healthy levels of investment and fundraising, rampant disruptive innovation, and the ever present belief in the determination of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs kept sentiment at a relatively high level.”


Until then, all the downbeat talk is just that. Cannice compiled comments from many of the VCs in the survey, asking them to clarify their confidence rating. Most of the quotes are quite optimistic, and any negativity seems to point inward: “The ‘bubble’ talk has grown louder, especially discussion about high valuation and burn rates,” wrote Jon Soberg of Expansive Ventures. “I expect VCs will be more conservative in the coming months and will fulfill the predictions of things slowing down.”


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Investor's Business Daily: Jobless Claims Down, Leading Indicators Up

Investor's Business Daily: Jobless Claims Down, Leading Indicators Up | USF in the News | Scoop.it

 Venture capitalist sentiment declined in Q3, according to the Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index developed by a University of San Francisco professor. The index dipped to 3.89 from 4.02 on a 5-point scale, the first decline in 2 years and reflecting VC belief of frothiness in the market
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Catholic San Francisco: USF grants focus on Western Addition

Catholic San Francisco: USF grants focus on Western Addition | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Leo T. McCarthy Center at the University of San Francisco announced its first-ever Engage San Francisco grant recipients. Launched in spring 2014, Engage San Francisco is a new university-wide initiative focused on the Western Addition neighborhood, working in partnership with organizations and residents to improve the support for underserved children, youth and families living in the often overlooked corners of the neighborhood, USF announced Oct. 16. The initiative includes faculty, staff and students from all five colleges at USF – School of Management, Nursing and Health Professions, Law, Education, and the College of Arts and Sciences – as well as the Division of Student Life. As part of Engage San Francisco, groups from USF partner with nonprofits from the Western Addition to develop unique projects and community-based learning opportunities that support student learning and meet community-identified needs. Engage San Francisco’s goals and strategies are informed by the ongoing consideration of community assets and opportunities for partnerships. All grantees will share their outcomes at the completion of the projects. 

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Tuesday at USF: Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) Discussion

Tuesday at USF: Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) Discussion | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Oakland Museum and Galería de la Raza Curators Speak at USF’s Day of the Dead Event, Oct. 21

WHAT:  USF’s Thacher Gallery will be hosting “Day of the Dead: A Conversation with Community Curators Evelyn Orantes and Ani Rivera,” to discuss the role that Day of the Dead programming plays in community-building and celebrating Mexican culture. Orantes, curator of Public Practice at the Oakland Museum, and Rivera, executive director of Galería de la Raza, will examine past programming, current community and institutional challenges, and share their hopes and insights for future programming.

WHEN:  Tuesday, October 21, 2014, from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

WHERE:  McLaren Conference Center 252 on USF’s main campus at 2130 Fulton St.

ABOUT:
The Mary and Carter Thacher Gallery is housed at the core of the University of San Francisco’s Gleeson Library/Geschke Learning Resources Center. For more than 12 years, it has been a cultural crossroads at the heart of the USF campus. “Day of the Dead: A Conversation with Community Curators Evelyn Orantes and Ani Rivera” is in conjunction with Thacher Gallery’s current exhibition, Dobles Vidas: Folk Art from The Mexican Museum. Orantes has been with the Oakland Museum for 15 years and has led various Day of the Dead exhibitions and celebrations. Rivera has been involved with the nonprofit community-based arts organization, Galería de la Raza, for more than a decade. Located in the Mission, the Galería featured one of the first visual arts exhibitions that started the Day of the Dead cultural observance in the nation. With Orante’s and Rivera’s experience in meaningful community-engagement surrounding culture, the event will include a dynamic conversation about the ways in which culture, identity, and community can come together.

CONTACT: For more information, please contact Glori L. Simmons at 415.422.5178 or simmons@usfca.edu.

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Blooomberg News: Steyer Deploys Ark, and a Flood of Money

Blooomberg News: Steyer Deploys Ark, and a Flood of Money | USF in the News | Scoop.it

As rising seas threaten Florida, billionaire Thomas Steyer is floating an $8.6 million campaign to save the state, opening 21 offices, dispatching more than 500 staffers and volunteers and deploying a rolling ark.


The founder of hedge fund Farallon Capital Management LLC is pouring $36 million into seven states to show climate change can swing elections. That helps make him the largest individual U.S. political donor during the past two years, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.


Through his NextGen Climate, a super political action committee, Steyer is seeking to persuade voters that sound environmental policy will help the economy and protect public health. He’s made Florida his primary battleground, contending that the state lacks a progressive energy policy as rising sea levels threaten its shoreline. [via @BloombergNews]

...

Steyer’s climate-change activism may position him to run for statewide office in California, said Corey Cook, an associate professor of politics at the University of San Francisco.


Unlike Hewlett-Packard Co. Chief Executive Officer Meg Whitman, who spent $140 million of her own money in an unsuccessful 2010 campaign for governor, Steyer’s issue-based effort “establishes his political bona fides,” Cook said. “He’s picked an issue that is near and dear to Californians.”

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Bloomberg Law: Texas Abortion Clinics Can Reopen (Audio)

Bloomberg Law: Texas Abortion Clinics Can Reopen (Audio) | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Maya Manian, a professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law, and Mary-Anne Pazanowski, a legal editor for Bloomberg BNA’s Health Law Reporter, discuss the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to order Texas to stop enforcing new restrictions on abortion clinics. They speak with June Grasso and Michael Best on Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg Law."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Maya Manian, professor of law at the University of San Francisco School of Law and a visiting scholar at the Columbia Law School Center for Gender and Sexuality Law for the 2014-2015 academic year, focuses her research on access to reproductive healthcare and explores the relationship between reproductive rights and gender equality. She publishes and presents regularly on abortion rights and related constitutional issues. She previously served as a Blackmun Fellowship Attorney at the Center for Reproductive Rights in New York City, where she was a visiting scholar for a series of events during the 2011–2012 academic year. Professor Manian received her undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan and her law degree magna cum laude from Harvard Law School, where she served on the Harvard Law Review.

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