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The Chronicle of Higher Education: Bid to Hold Teacher Colleges Accountable Stirs a Debate Over Race

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Bid to Hold Teacher Colleges Accountable Stirs a Debate Over Race | USF in the News | Scoop.it

As Congress debates whether to scale back testing at the nation’s elementary and secondary schools, a quieter fight is playing out behind the scenes over efforts to extend test-based accountability to the country’s teacher colleges.
 

At issue in both debates—one over renewal of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and the other over a draft rule for teacher-preparation programs, introduced by the Education Department in late November—is the question of whether holding teachers and schools accountable for student learning helps, or hinders, efforts to close racial gaps in student achievement.
 

On one side is the Obama administration, which argues that tying federal funds to measures of student growth compels educators and institutions to improve; on the other side are the educators themselves, who say testing hurts the low-income and minority students it’s meant to help. [via @chronicle]

...

Teacher-prep programs have been under fire from the administration for years, with Secretary Duncan accusing them of having lax standards and doing a "mediocre job."


"The achievement gap is really the tip of this much bigger iceberg of systemic problems in education," said Kevin K. Kumashiro, dean of education at the University of San Francisco, in an interview. "We need to be talking about the larger problems and not just trying to blame teachers."

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Nationally Recognized Business Leaders Aída M. Álvarez and Deborah Álvarez-Rodriguez Speak at USF’s Latinas in Leadership Forum on Jan. 30

Nationally Recognized Business Leaders Aída M. Álvarez and Deborah Álvarez-Rodriguez Speak at USF’s Latinas in Leadership Forum on Jan. 30 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

SAN FRANCISCO (January 22, 2015) – The University of San Francisco (USF) will spotlight the innovative leadership that inspires, supports, and develops the success of the Latina and Chicana community during the USF Stakeholder Community Forum: Latinas in Leadership, on Friday, Jan. 30, from 9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Keynote speakers and sisters Aída M. Álvarez, board member of Walmart Board of Directors, and Deborah Álvarez-Rodriguez, founder and CEO of Seam Innovation, will speak about their personal stories of extraordinary success.
 

“Aída and Deborah, together on stage for the first time ever, will share the challenges they faced and choices they made that helped propel them to prominent positions and notable executives in America,” said USF Vice Provost Mary Wardell Ghirarduzzi. “Latinas are leading the growth of entrepreneurial endeavors in California and are emerging as a force throughout the San Francisco Bay Area, yet their contributions have not been fully recognized or visible in mainstream media or business. Our goal with this event is to advance and strengthen existing pathways for education, workforce preparation, and innovative leadership for Latinas throughout the community.”

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Latinas in Leadership will also feature the voices of outstanding Latinas from the USF and greater Bay Area as they engage in discussions moderated by USF Trustee Emeritus Rose Guilbault, who will be available to sign copies of her book The Latinas Guide to Success in the Workplace. The half-day conference will include a musical performance by singer, songwriter, and activist Diana Gameros.
 

The Stakeholder Community Forum: Latinas in Leadership, developed by USF’s Office of Diversity Engagement & Community Outreach, in partnership with San Francisco Business Times, will take place in the McLaren Conference Center on the USF campus. This event is free to USF students and faculty, and open to the public for a $25 registration fee. Please register by visiting https://www.usfca.edu/Diversity/Stakeholder_Community_Forums/.

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USF and VA Northern California Health Care System Receive $4.6 million to Train VA Nurses and Create Residency Program - University of San Francisco

SAN FRANCISCO (Jan. 20, 2015) — Veteran Affairs Northern California Health Care System (VANCHCS) and the University of San Francisco’s School of Nursing and Health Professions (SNAHP) have been awarded funding for a five-year program to establish a Veteran Affairs Nursing Academic Partnership (VANAP). This partnership will help unify and promote clinical and academic resources, increase baccalaureate student enrollment, and broaden clinical training capacity in the VA system.

Funded by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the VA Nursing Academic Partnership will be offered at USF’s Sacramento Campus and will subsidize six VA faculty, four USF faculty, and two part-time program directors providing joint oversight of VANAP. Each cohort will be comprised of 20 students who will do the clinical portion of the program at VA sites. The goal of the VANAP is to create a model of sustainability for educating well-qualified nurses with specialized training in the health issues facing Veterans.

“We are honored to be in an academic partnership with the University of San Francisco,” said Kathryn Bucher, RN, MSN, NE-BC, associate director for Patient Care Services/Nurse Executive at VA Northern California Health Care System. “This program will provide both entities with a platform to champion patient-centered care and to prepare nurses to deliver quality health care for our Veterans.”

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KGO Radio: USF Law Professor Dan Lathrope Discusses Taxes & Covered California

Professor Daniel Lathrope's teaching and research focus is taxation. He is the co-author of several casebooks on individual, corporate, and partnership taxation, including Fundamentals of Federal Income Taxation, Fundamentals of Corporate Taxation, and Fundamentals of Partnership Taxation. He is the author of The Alternative Minimum Tax--Compliance and Planning with Analysis, a treatise on the alternative minimum tax, and a book on comparative income taxation titled Global Issues in Income Taxation. He has taught in the graduate tax programs at New York University and the University of Florida. He has also taught at UC Hastings, UC Berkeley, Pacific McGeorge, and Leiden University in the Netherlands.


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Foreign Affairs: Narendra Modi and the Rise of Popular Hinduism

Foreign Affairs: Narendra Modi and the Rise of Popular Hinduism | USF in the News | Scoop.it

By Vamsee Juluri

Narendra Modi’s prime ministership represents, for many Indians, a civilizational resurgence on a scale not seen since their country’s independence. Modi’s sweeping victory, in May 2014, reflected not just a desire for better governance but also a larger shift in the Indian worldview. For Modi’s supporters, and for Hindus in particular, Modi’s rise showcased India’s renewed sense of self as an ancient civilization on the threshold of a global rebirth.
 

Modi is the first Indian prime minister born after independence, and his appeal among India’s youth can be best understood in generational terms. India’s rising generation, people under the age of 25, sometimes called the children of liberalization, constitute half of its current population. Their parents came of age after independence, when India was struggling to define its identity in the aftermath of the India-Pakistan partition. Their grandparents constitute the last generation of Indians to have been colonial subjects.

For each successive generation, Hinduism has become a larger part of public identity. For India’s oldest living people, being Hindu was once a hidden affair. As colonial subjects, Hindus learned to accept—or at least to not publicly contest—the basic premise of the British civilizing mission, which saw Indian culture as vastly inferior to its European counterpart. For much of the colonial era, Hindus held their religion back from the public eye, submerging it in private rituals—a far cry from the social eminence it once had as a philosophical and cultural worldview guiding Indian life. 
[via @ForeignAffairs]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Vamsee Juluri received his PhD in Communication from the University of Massachusetts in 1999. His research interest is in the globalization of media audiences with an emphasis on Indian television and cinema, mythology, religion, violence and Gandhian philosophy. He is the author of four books:
 

Becoming a Global Audience: Longing and Belonging in Indian Music Television (Peter Lang, 2003/Orient Longman, 2005)
The Mythologist: A Novel (Penguin India, 2010)
Bollywood Nation: India through its Cinema (Penguin India, 2013).
Rearming Hinduism: Nature, History and the Return of Indian Intelligence (Westland, 2014)
 

His work has been published in journals such as Communication Theory, Television and New Media, European Journal of Cultural Studies, and Critical Studies in Mass Communication and in various scholarly anthologies on globalization, audiences, and Indian cinema.

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Wanda's Picks Radio Special: USF's Dr. Clarence Jones Speaks about Dr. King's Legacy

Wanda's Picks Radio Special: USF's Dr. Clarence Jones Speaks about Dr. King's Legacy | USF in the News | Scoop.it

We feature interviews with Dr. Clarence Benjamin Jones Sr., a former speechwriter, attorney, and advisor to the late Martin Luther King Jr., on the occasion of Dr. King's 86th birthday. Dr. Jones is a Diversity Scholar at the University of San Francisco. 

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New Yorker: D. A. Powell’s Unruly Elegies

New Yorker: D. A. Powell’s Unruly Elegies | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Few events in our recent history are more bewildering to capture in words than the gay community’s experience of the AIDS crisis. Decades after its start, we are still coming to terms with what it meant for hundreds of thousands of men to have the satiation of their desires—the very thing that already marginalized them in society—threaten to extinguish them. A number of writers of the eighties and nineties created lasting elegies for their fast-disappearing communities: Paul Monette’s lyrical memoir of his last days with his lover, “Borrowed Time”; Mark Doty’s hauntingly beautiful poetry collections “My Alexandria” and “Atlantis”; and Tony Kushner’s magical, Brechtian “Angels in America” are the ones that I continually return to. But perhaps no poet succeeded in creating a singular poetic language to embody the era as fully as D. A. Powell did in his extraordinary triptych “Repast,” which is comprised of the collections “Tea,” “Lunch,” and “Cocktails,” and was recently published in a single volume for the first time. [via @NewYorker]

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It’s tempting, given Powell’s subject matter and personal history, to chart the milestones of his life against the history of AIDS. He was born, in Georgia, in 1963 and turned eighteen in 1981, roughly two months before the Times published its first report on a “rare cancer seen in 41 homosexuals.” He earned an M.F.A. from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop in 1996, the year the number of annual AIDS deaths finally began to decline. The publication of “Tea,” “Lunch,” and “Cocktails” (the series was billed as a contemporary Divine Comedy) spanned the time between when Powell himself learned that he was H.I.V.-positive and the rise of the antiretroviral “cocktail” that made life for many people with H.I.V. or AIDS less about dying than about surviving with complications. (Powell is now fifty-one; he teaches at the University of San Francisco and, in 2013, won the National Book Critics Circle Award for “Useless Landscape”.)

University of San Francisco's insight:

D. A. Powell's books include Cocktails (Graywolf, 2004) and Chronic (Graywolf, 2009), both finalists for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry, and Useless Landscape, or A Guide for Boys (Graywolf, 2012), winner of the 2013 Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry. Powell's awards include the Kingsley Tufts Prize, a Pushcart Prize and the California Book Award. He has taught at Columbia University, University of Iowa, and Harvard University.

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KQED: King Would Side With Black Lives Matter Protesters, Says Professor

KQED: King Would Side With Black Lives Matter Protesters, Says Professor | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. would side with today’s young protesters, says African-American studies Professor James Taylor.
 

The civil rights hero’s holiday this year took on a special significance, coming on the heels of anti-police violence protests and the release of the movie “Selma,” which marks the 50th anniversary of the voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. [via @KQEDNews]

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A key similarity between the historical black civil rights movement and the current wave of demonstrations is that it’s a youth-led movement, said Taylor, a politics professor at the University of San Francisco who also teaches African-American studies at UC Berkeley. Taylor is the author of the book “Black Nationalism in the United States: From Malcolm X to Barack Obama.
 

“I think people tend to look at the civil rights movement as an old movement, because it happened 40 to 50 years ago,” Taylor noted in an interview with KQED’s Rachel Dornhelm. “But it was, 40 to 50 years ago, a movement of young people.”


“At the very moment these movements seem to have cooled, all of a sudden here we are today talking about these seemingly spontaneous actions of young people on the weekend of MLK’s birthday. So I think there’s some inspiration young people are getting from the legacy and memory of Dr. King at this moment. And if anybody’s sort of confused about it, you can be clear — with King, we have 13 years of a record where you can determine that MLK would clearly be on the side of the young people today that are out there in the streets."
 

“I think these people have learned to comfort the disturbed, and disturb the comfortable. And that’s why they’re taking over freeways, taking over malls, taking over stores. … I think Black Lives Matter has become a slogan, like Black Power was 50 years ago. It can’t be left as a slogan. It has to become more than a slogan. It has to become part of a psychology of America.”

University of San Francisco's insight:

James Lance Taylor is author of the book Black Nationalism in the United States: From Malcolm X to Barack Obama, which earned 2011 "Outstanding Academic Title" -Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries (January 2012). He is associate professor and Chair of the Department of Politics at the University of San Francisco. His undergraduate degree is from Pepperdine University and his graduate degrees were earned at the University of Southern California (USC). He has taught previously as a Visiting Associate Professor of political science at Saint Louis University in Madrid, Spain and political science and African American Studies at University of California, Berkeley.


Taylor has also served as a policy consultant for the San Francisco Human Rights Commission and San Francisco Board of Supervisors. His teaching and research scholarly interests are in religion and politics in the United States, race and ethnic politics, African American political history, social movements, political ideology, law and public policy, and the U.S. Presidency. He lives with his family in Oakland, California.

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Hoodline SF: The Many Lives Of Saint Ignatius Church

Hoodline SF: The Many Lives Of Saint Ignatius Church | USF in the News | Scoop.it

If you've spent any time in San Francisco in the last 100 years, chances are you've had at least a cursory peek at Saint Ignatius Church, the towering behemoth that's easily visible from many corners of the city. In particular, the church features prominently in the visible skyline from the Upper Haight (especially Buena Vista Park) and Cole Valley.
 

Chances are, too, that you haven't actually been inside, or heard how it ended up there. So what's the story behind Saint Ignatius?
 

The church as we know it is just now 100 years old. But Saint Ignatius Church in San Francisco has a long history: after its initial inception (1855) but immediately before its current life at the corner of Parker and Fulton, it was actually on the current site of Davies Symphony Hall, at Van Ness and Hayes.


The Hayes Valley location was built in 1880. Since its 1855 inception, the church was associated with what eventually became the University of San Francisco (then Saint Ignatius Academy).


After that, the church moved out towards Golden Gate Park, where the new edifice at its current location was designed by Oakland architect Charles J. I. Devlin. Construction was completed some time around 1914 or 1915, depending on who you ask, which means that the church is currently celebrating its centennial. [via @hoodlineSF]


University of San Francisco's insight:

Convocation and graduation–the first and last stops of every USF student’s academic career–take place inside St. Ignatius.

Since 1914, St. Ignatius has been an icon for the University of San Francisco and for the city. The church’s mission complements the University’s, offering social outreach opportunities, ministry programs and two student-centered Masses every Sunday.

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US China Daily: Falling sales in China jolt Tesla shares

US China Daily: Falling sales in China jolt Tesla shares | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Shares of Tesla Motors Inc may have tumbled Wednesday on slowing sales in China, but the picture is not as bleak to some who follow the electric-car maker's future there.
 

"I believe that electric cars will take off when technology gets better and gas stations can also charge cars," Stanley Kwong, a professor of international marketing at the University of San Francisco, told China Daily.
 

Shares of Palo Alto, California-based Tesla fell 5.7 percent to close at $192.69 in New York trading on Wednesday, their largest one-day drop since Oct 27. [via @ChinaDailyUSA]

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Kwong, who worked as the worldwide program director of IBM for more than 30 years, said there are customer concerns about charging facilities: "Whether it is in California or China, most people are looking at an electric car only as a second or third vehicle because of its range and the lack of charging facilities.
 

"The city of Beijing has announced that they would build 30 charging areas in 2015," Kwong said. "However, it is still way too few for someone who depends on driving."
 

Kwong believes the electric car is vital to reducing air pollution in China. 

University of San Francisco's insight:

Stanley Kwong brings to USF over 30 years of international management, marketing and teaching experience in the US, China, India, and Central Europe. Professor Kwong is recognized as a leading expert on marketing strategy, branding, and investments policies and is frequently interviewed on branding in China and Chinese investments in the U.S. by top media, such as the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, SingTao News, and Chinese World Journal. He is a highly desired guest speaker at industry conferences and universities worldwide.
 

As a former Worldwide Program Director for IBM Developers Marketing, Professor Kwong shares his multifaceted experience-based knowledge of outsourcing and offshoring, globalization trends, marketing management and international business with his undergraduate, MBA and MBAE students.

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KTVU-TV: USF Politics Professor Comments on Kamala Harris & a Senate Run

Corey Cook, USF associate professor of politics and director of the Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good, is an expert on urban poli...
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KCBS Radio: Leading Change: Law Enforcement Technology at USF

The University of San Francisco (USF), in partnership with the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD), presents the 20th annual Law Enforcement Symposium tak...
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KPIX-TV News: USF Hosts Conference on Police Technology

The University of San Francisco (USF), in partnership with the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD), presents the 20th annual Law Enforcement Symposium tak...
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Washington Post: Researchers urge Arne Duncan to drop proposed teacher prep regulations

Washington Post: Researchers urge Arne Duncan to drop proposed teacher prep regulations | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The U.S. Education Department late last year released a draft set of regulations for colleges of education, saying that too many teachers are not prepared to do their jobs well. The draft regulations, which would include ratings of schools by department-set criteria, were immediately controversial with educators and researchers for several reasons, including a provision that would link some federal funding in part to how well the students of their graduates do on standardized test scores. Interested parties have until Feb. 2 to submit comments on the proposal here.
 

The National Education Policy Center at the University of Colorado Boulder recently released a review of the proposed regulations. It was written by Kevin Kumashiro, dean of the University of San Francisco School of Education, and identifies a series of major concerns, including “an underestimation of what could be a quite high and unnecessary cost and burden,” “an unfounded attribution of educational inequities to individual teachers rather than to root systemic causes,” and “a reliance on scientifically discredited processes of test-based accountability and value-added measures for data analysis.”
 

The California Alliance of Researchers for Equity and Education, known as CARE-ED, has written an open letter to Education Secretary Arne Duncan urging him to withdraw the proposed regulations. Scores of university-based researchers throughout California (including faculty, researchers, and administrators) have already signed, others can still do so through Jan. 31. [via @washingtonpost]

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Impressive Dürer Art Exhibit Opens at USF - USF’s First Exhibition of 2015 Explores Earliest Moments of Print

Impressive Dürer Art Exhibit Opens at USF  - USF’s First Exhibition of 2015 Explores Earliest Moments of Print | USF in the News | Scoop.it

SAN FRANCISCO (Jan. 21, 2015) — The University of San Francisco’s (USF) Donohue Rare Book Room and Thacher Gallery will partner with USF’s Masters in Museum Studies Program to present, Reformations: Dürer & the New Age of Print, an historically important grouping of early European books and prints from the University’s permanent collection. The exhibition opens Monday, Jan. 26 and runs through Feb. 22.

A collaborative, student-curated exhibit, Reformations: Dürer & the New Age of Print, focuses on the earliest moments of print and printed book culture in Europe, particularly concentrating on the impact of new print technologies and their uses in and around Nuremberg, Germany in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries.
 

This exhibition highlights how the new production and circulation of early prints and printed books, including devotional woodcuts, humanist texts, pamphlets, and fine, collectible prints, reflects and contributed to religious and cultural change during a transformative period in Western history.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dürer & the New Age of Print Events:

Tuesday, Jan. 27: An insider’s introduction and roundtable will take place from 1:30-3 p.m. in USF’s McLaren Conference Center 250, followed by an opening reception from 3-4 p.m. in Thacher Gallery and the Donohue Rare Book Room. The roundtable will feature Susan M. Dackerman (Consultative Curator of Prints, Harvard Art Museums), Elizabeth A. Honig (Professor of History of Art, University of California, Berkeley), Katrina B. Olds (Associate Professor of History, University of San Francisco), two Museum Studies student curators, Sabrina Oliveras and Melissa Zabel, and will be moderated by Kate Lusheck (Assistant Professor, Art History & Museum Studies, University of San Francisco).


Thursday, Jan. 29 at 12 p.m., Thacher Gallery: A special chamber music performance by USF Performing Arts faculty.
There will also be a series of gallery talks focused on specialized topics to accompany the exhibit by USF faculty members. Each of these events begin in the Thacher Gallery.


Wednesday, Feb. 4 from 1-2 p.m.: Focus on Renaissance Book Culture by Professor Katrina Olds (History)


Thursday, Feb. 5 from 1-2 p.m.: Focus on Dürer by Professor Kate Lusheck (Art History, Museum Studies, Art& Architecture)


Thursday, Feb. 12 from 1-2 p.m.: Focus on Printmaking demonstration by Professor Arturo Araujo (Fine Art, Art & Architecture)


Thursday, Feb. 19 from 1-2 p.m.: Focus on Renaissance Typography by Professor Stuart McKee (Design, Art & Architecture)
All of these events are free and open to the public.

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The Pueblo Chieftain: For Nino, baseball equals family

The Pueblo Chieftain: For Nino, baseball equals family | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Sunday was all about family. And rightly so.

 

Nino Giarratano became the second individual to be inducted into the Runyon Field Wall of Fame on Sunday and his message at the annual banquet was clear.
 

“Kids, when you’re parents are proud of you, there is no better feeling in the world,” he said. “Today, my parents are proud of me.”

Giarratano joins former Fowler High School standout and Kansas City Royals pitcher Luke Hochevar into the wall of fame.
 

Giarratano was the keynote speaker at the Sangre de Cristo Arts and Conference Center.
 

Giarratano belongs to one of Pueblo’s premier baseball families. He grew up at Runyon Field, played for South High School and was the second baseman on the 1979 Legion A state championship team. He’s now in his 17th season as the head baseball coach at the University of San Francisco.


He is 457-453 with the Dons and is the winningest coach in the history of the program. He’s a three-time West Coast Conference Coach of the Year (2005, 2006, 2011) and also was an assistant coach with the 2010 and 2008 U.S. National collegiate team.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Now in his 17th season on the Hilltop, Nino Giarratano has guided the Dons baseball program to unprecedented success over his tenure.
 

The three-time West Coast Conference Coach of the Year has led USF to two WCC championships, three postseason appearances and the most wins in program history (457 and counting). Forty-three players have been named to the All-WCC First Team, including two WCC Player of the Year awards, two WCC Defensive Player of the Year honors and a WCC Pitcher of the Year selection.

Along the way, he has helped to develop players and have had numerous Dons drafted by Major League Baseball teams. Since 2004, 30 Diamond Dons have been selected and some have even reached the pinnacle of the sport.

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Fox News Latino: Opinion - The Supreme Court should uphold the Fair Housing Act in its entirety

Fox News Latino: Opinion - The Supreme Court should uphold the Fair Housing Act in its entirety | USF in the News | Scoop.it

By John Trasviña


As our nation pays tribute to Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. this week, much attention is focused on his leadership role in passing the Voting Rights Act of 1965, thanks to the release of the critically-acclaimed film, “Selma.”
 

But another important federal civil rights law is also a part of Dr. King’s proud legacy, and it may now be in peril. The Fair Housing Act of 1968 was passed with bipartisan support by Congress only one week after Dr. King’s assassination. Indeed, the tragic killing of Dr. King spurred Congress into addressing the serious and persistent harms of housing segregation and passing the Act. Two years before, King had begun a campaign against racial segregation in housing that swept the nation and brought attention to the appalling conditions and isolation of segregated slums.

For over 45 years, the Fair Housing Act has worked to eliminate barriers to housing and to promote diverse and thriving communities. The Act ensures that no one is denied housing based on race, color, national origin, religion, gender, disability or familial status. The importance of equal opportunity in housing cannot be overstated. When persons are limited in their housing choices through any form of discrimination, they are simultaneously deprived of access to good jobs, quality education, and a clean and safe environment. [via @foxnewslatino]

University of San Francisco's insight:

John Trasviña is the 18th dean of the USF School of Law. Dean Trasviña received his AB from Harvard University in 1980 and his JD from Stanford Law School in 1983. Most recently, Dean Trasviña was the assistant secretary for fair housing and equal opportunity in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Dean Trasviña was appointed by President Obama in 2009, and unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate. He led more than 580 employees in 43 offices across the country to enforce the nation’s fair housing laws. 


A native San Franciscan, Dean Trasviña began his career as a deputy city attorney here in 1983 before joining MALDEF in Washington, D.C., as a legislative attorney in 1985. He later worked for U.S. Sen. Paul Simon as general counsel and staff director for the U.S. Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution. In 1997, President Bill Clinton appointed Dean Trasviña special counsel for immigration-related unfair employment practices. In that capacity, he led the only federal government office devoted solely to immigrant workplace rights and was the highest ranking Latino attorney at the U.S. Department of Justice.

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KGO Radio: USF Law Prof Julie Nice Comments on Supreme Court & Same-Sex Marriage

Professor Julie A. Nice joined the USF faculty in 2009 as the Herbst Foundation Professor of Law. She has received 12 awards for her law teaching, including the 2012 Distinguished Professor Award at USF. Nice focuses her scholarly work on constitutional law, poverty law, and sexuality law. She is the lead author of Poverty Law: Theory and Practice, and has written numerous articles. Nice previously served as the Delaney Professor of Law at the University of Denver, where she received numerous Professor of the Year for Teaching Excellence awards as well as the alumni's Robert B. Yegge Excellence in Teaching Award and the university's William T. Driscoll Master Educator Award. She previously taught as a clinical fellow at Northwestern University School of Law and as a visiting professor at University of Michigan School of Law and University of Connecticut School of Law. Before she began teaching, she was a public interest litigator at the Legal Assistance Foundation of Chicago.

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The Hill: Path to Senate runs through Silicon Valley

The Hill: Path to Senate runs through Silicon Valley | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Silicon Valley could be a kingmaker in California’s 2016 Senate race.

Sen. Barbara Boxer’s (D-Calif.) decision not to seek reelection has created the first open Senate seat in the state since Mark Zuckerberg and many of his peers were in grade school.
 

To make sure their interests are taken care of in Washington, the well-heeled tech sector is sure to be on the front lines of the potentially billion-dollar race.
 

“I think they’ll be very much involved,” predicted Corey Cook, a professor at the University of San Francisco who focuses on California politics. “I think it’ll be critical to the fundraising and to the storyline.” [via @TheHill]

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If that’s the case, early front-runner Attorney General Kamala Harris (D) seems to be already plugged in.
 

Harris was born in Oakland, Calif., and served as a district attorney in San Francisco before being elected as California’s first female African-American attorney general in 2010.
 

“Kamala comes out of San Francisco,” said Cook, the University of San Francisco professor. “She’s been dealing with tech politics since she was the district attorney in San Francisco.”

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Mercury News: Voters beware - November 2016 ballot will likely be filled with propositions

Mercury News: Voters beware - November 2016 ballot will likely be filled with propositions | USF in the News | Scoop.it

California voters in November 2016 may be forced to read a ballot pamphlet as long and dense as a political science textbook -- and oddly enough, they'll have the millions who sat out last year's sleepy elections to thank for the extra work.
 

The number of signatures required to get a measure on the ballot is reset every four years, based on the votes cast for governor in the previous general election. Since only 42 percent of the state's registered voters -- a record low -- turned out in November, it's going to be easier than ever to put a proposed law before the people.
 

A complete list of 2016 ballot initiatives won't take shape until early next year, but the short list is already a mile long. It includes proposals to legalize marijuana for recreational use, overturn the new plastic bag ban, increase tobacco taxes, eliminate the death penalty, make over the landmark Proposition 13 and boost California's minimum wage even higher. [via @mercnews]

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"There's a storm of pent-up issues that folks have waited to put on the ballot in a presidential election year," said Corey Cook, director of the University of San Francisco's Leo T. McCarthy Center. "The sense now is that the ballot could be huge."

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KGO-TV: USF's Clarence Jones Discusses Selma

In commemoration of Dr. King's birthday, Clarence Benjamin Jones Sr., a former speechwriter, attorney, and advisor to the late Martin Luther King Jr., was in...
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Huffington Post: Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on His 86th Birthday

Huffington Post: Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on His 86th Birthday | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Today is the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Were he alive today, nearly 47 years after his assassination in Memphis, Tennessee, he would be 86 years of age.
 

This weekend our nation will observe its annual commemoration of this great man's life. It comes at a time when national and international events have provoked a lot of discussion about what Dr. King would say or do in response to those events if he were alive today.
 

An entire generation of Americans has grown up associating Dr. King almost exclusively with his 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech (which I copyrighted; it is now one of the most valuable intellectual properties of the King estate). Few people today know of his opinions on issues like poverty and income inequality, or of his early support for Israel and his public opposition to the war in Vietnam.

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This blog post addresses some of the important contemporary domestic and international issues that I believe would be of major concern to Dr. King if he were alive today. My statements are not based on what I have read or on what some third party told me. They are based on my personal recollections of conversations and discussions I had with Dr. King one-on-one, and of conversations we had together with third parties, over the approximately seven years I worked with him as a political advisor, personal lawyer and draft speechwriter.

Martin, we miss you. 

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Jones is currently a Visiting Professor, University of San Francisco and a Scholar Writer in Residence, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research & Education Institute, Stanford University, and Palo Alto, CA. In a distinguished and heralded career, Clarence B. Jones served as political advisor, counsel and draft speechwriter for the Reverend Dr, Martin Luther King, Jr., joined Sanford I. Weill and Arthur Levitt, Jr. in Carter, Berlind & Weill, Inc. as an Allied Member of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), becoming the "first African American " partner in a Wall Street investment banking firm, has been twice recognized as Fortune Magazine's "Business Man of the Month," and founded successful financial, corporate and media-related ventures. He has also provided strategic legal and financial consulting services to several governments around the world including The Bahamas, The Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and Zambia.
 

Dr. Jones has received numerous state and national awards recognizing his significant contributions to American society. Through his work in the civil rights movement, he has dramatically impacted the course of American history. He coordinated the legal defense of Dr. King and the other leaders of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference against the libel suits filed against them and The New York Times by the police commissioner and other city officials of Birmingham, AL. The Supreme Court ruling in this case - Sullivan vs. The New York Times - resulted in the landmark decision on the current law of libel.

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NPR: Harris Opens Bid For Boxer's Senate Seat, But Others May Follow

NPR: Harris Opens Bid For Boxer's Senate Seat, But Others May Follow | USF in the News | Scoop.it

A lot of Californians weren't even born the last time a new senator was elected, but that's about to change. California Senator Barbara Boxer's decision last week to not seek a fifth term set off a scramble among possible successors in what will be the state's first wide-open Senate race in nearly a quarter-century. As NPR's Richard Gonzales reports, it's widely assumed that another Democrat will win in this deeply blue state. And the first person to enter the race already looks like a front-runner.

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GONZALES: Three years ago, Harris forged an $18-billion settlement with big banks accused of unfair home foreclosures. On top of that, Harris is California's first female, first African-American and first Asian-American state attorney general. Corey Cook teaches politics at the University of San Francisco.


COREY COOK: Kamala Harris is the most well-known. She's obviously won statewide. She has very high approval ratings in California. But if it becomes a multiple candidate field, it becomes much more difficult to handicap.

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China Daily Newspaper: US again gets most Chinese funding

China Daily Newspaper: US again gets most Chinese funding | USF in the News | Scoop.it

It was another good year for Chinese investment in the United 

States.


In 2014, there was a total of $17 billion in Chinese investment in 

the USaccording to a report by

the American Enterprise InstituteHeritage Foundation China Global Investment Tracker onMondayThat is $3 billion more than last 

yearaccording to the data.

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Stanley Kwong, a professor at the University of San Francisco, also believes that Chinese investment in the US will grow.


"I am expecting an even higher percentage from China's private sector, especially consumer

electronics, high tech, software, food technology and even manufacturing," said Kwong, who mentioned that Silicon Valley, California, has frequently seen investment made by Chinese
 
venture capital firms.


"All of these trends are extremely positive on building China's image in the US," Kwong said. "The growth in US-China trade will definitely help consolidate the people-to-people relations between the two countries."


[via @ChinaDailyUSA]
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KGO-TV News: California Law Enforcement Professionals Meet at USF

The University of San Francisco (USF), in partnership with the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD), presents the 20th annual Law Enforcement Symposium tak...
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