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USF Welcomes New Faculty Member in Hospitality Management

USF Welcomes New Faculty Member in Hospitality Management | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The School of Management at the University of San Francisco (USF) is pleased to announce Thomas Maier as a new faculty member in the Department of Hospitality Management.


Thomas Maier brings to USF more than 20 years of industry experience, a wealth of current research, and a honed experiential teaching methodology. He earned his Ph.D. in Leadership Philosophy at Gonzaga University, and his M.A. in Human Development at Salve Regina University. Prior to academia, Professor Maier was a senior level executive in the international hotel, restaurant, and food and beverage industries. His research interests include applied leadership, restaurant revenue management theory, and business analytics.


“Tom is a terrific addition to our program and team of faculty,” said David Jones, professor and department chair of Hospitality Management at USF. “Beginning this fall, he’ll be teaching our food and beverage class—bringing his unique blend of significant industry experience in hotel development and solid academic credentials to create a dynamic learning environment for our students.”

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Forbes: Startup Schools - America's Most Entrepreneurial Universities

Forbes: Startup Schools - America's Most Entrepreneurial Universities | USF in the News | Scoop.it

FORBES ranked the nation’s most entrepreneurial research universities based on their entrepreneurial ratios – the number of alumni and students who have identified themselves as founders and business owners on LinkedIn against the school’s total student body (undergraduate and graduate combined). [via @forbes]

...

21. University of San Francisco

University of San Francisco's insight:

The University of San Francisco is located in the heart of one of the world's most innovative and stunning cities and is home to a vibrant academic community of students and faculty who achieve excellence in their fields. Its diverse student body enjoys direct access to faculty, small classes, and outstanding opportunities in the city itself. USF is San Francisco’s first university, and its Jesuit Catholic mission helps ignite a student's passion for social justice and a desire to “Change the World from Here.” For more information, please visit www.usfca.edu.

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University of San Francisco Partners with The Mexican Museum to Present Dobles Vidas

University of San Francisco Partners with The Mexican Museum to Present Dobles Vidas | USF in the News | Scoop.it
University of San Francisco's insight:

The University of San Francisco’s Thacher Gallery is pleased to announce its second collaboration with The Mexican Museum to present folk art traditions from Mexico. The exhibition, Dobles Vidas: Folk Art from The Mexican Museum, will showcase more than 60 artworks that explore the many stories an object can tell about the people, places, and traditions of those who create, use, and collect them. From Huichol yarn paintings to wooden animals, ceramic muñecas to barro negro, Dobles Vidas examines the many facets of folk art in Mexico as a way to build understanding. Located insideUSF’sGleeson Library, the Thacher Gallery is free and open to the public from noon to 6 p.m. daily.

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Politico: DHS Chief Jeh Johnson said to favor asylum change

Politico: DHS Chief Jeh Johnson said to favor asylum change | USF in the News | Scoop.it

A House committee chairman said Tuesday that Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson favors changing the law to make it more difficult for illegal immigrants to pass the first test many face in the process for claiming asylum in the U.S.


House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte said at a hearing on immigration issues that Johnson backs changing the so-called "credible fear" standard under which Citizenship and Immigration Service officers screen illegal immigrants to see if they qualify to pursue a formal asylum claim.


"The speaker’s border crisis working group of which I am a member recently met with Secretary Johnson. During that meeting, I asked the secretary what would be needed in order to address the surge in those claiming credible fear," Goodlatte said. "Secretary Johnson indicated that a change in law to strengthen the credible fear standard would be necessary to fix the current situation." [via @politico]

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"You don't want to make a mistake when it comes to asylum," said Bill Ong Hing, a law professor at the University of San Francisco. "Credible fear is a screening mechanism…..To me it’s really disappointing to talk about setting up in a way that you don’t find credible fear in so many cases."


Hing said increases in individuals clearing what is often the first step in the asylum process are no surprise given the increase in narco-trafficking-related violence in Mexico and other parts of Central America in recent years. He said he was disturbed to hear that the Obama Administration regards the credible fear statistics as signaling a problem with the asylum system.


"I'm very disappointed in the Obama Administration. They're buying into the rhetoric of the critics of the border that these kids couldn’t possibly have valid claims for asylum," the professor said. "I'm saying take a deep breath and take a look at these claims."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Throughout his career, Professor Bill Ong Hing pursued social justice through a combination of community work, litigation, and scholarship. He is the author of numerous academic and practice-oriented publications on immigration policy and race relations, including Ethical Borders—NAFTA, Globalization, and Mexican Migration(Temple University Press, 2010), Deporting Our Souls-Morality, Values, and Immigration Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2006), Defining America Through Immigration Policy (Temple University Press, 2004), and Making and Remaking Asian America Through Immigration Policy (Stanford University Press, 1993). His book To Be An American: Cultural Pluralism and the Rhetoric of Assimilation (NYU Press, 1997) received the award for Outstanding Academic Book by the librarians' journal Choice. At UC Davis, Hing directed the law school clinical program. He was also co-counsel in the precedent-setting U.S. Supreme Court asylum case, INS v. Cardoza-Fonseca (1987). Hing is the founder of the Immigrant Legal Resource Center in San Francisco and continues to volunteer as general counsel for this organization. He serves on the National Advisory Council of the Asian American Justice Center in Washington, D.C.

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KPCC, Southern California's NPR Station: Amid criticism, Obama lands in LA for fundraising trip

KPCC, Southern California's NPR Station: Amid criticism, Obama lands in LA for fundraising trip | USF in the News | Scoop.it

President Obama will arrive in Los Angeles Wednesday as part of his West Coast fundraising tour. Along with raising money for the Dems for November's midterm elections, the President will also be giving a talk at Los Angeles Trade Technical College.


For Angelenos, who are no strangers to the President's frequent Southland visits, that means road closures and nightmarish traffic jams. But the President's trip this time around is also drawing criticism of a different sort. Republican National Committee spokesperson Kirsten Kukowski is one among many saying that he should devote his time to more urgent matters instead.


"With all that's happening in our country and around the world — wildfires, droughts and international crises, I think everyone can agree the last thing the president should be doing is fundraising," Kukowski said in a statement Tuesday.


The White House has defended the fundraising trips, but did cancel the President's appearance on "Jimmy Kimmel Live!" that had been scheduled for Wednesday night.

Guest:

Tony Quinn, Sacramento-based political analyst and co-editor of the California Target Book, which provides analysis of State Assembly, State Senate and Congressional races in California.

Ken Goldstein, professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco. He also teaches in the school’s Masters’ Program in Public Affairs, focusing on the skills needed to run a modern political campaign.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Ken Goldstein is a professor of politics and director of the USF in DC program. His areas of expertise include the use and impact of political advertising, voter turnout, survey methodology, and presidential elections. 

Prior to coming to USF, Ken was a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he won the University of Wisconsin's Kellet Award for his career research accomplishments and the Chancellor's Award for excellence in teaching. He also served as the president of Kantar Media CMAG, a Washington DC based political consulting firm focusing on media intelligence and is the chief record on political advertising. Former clients include both the 2012 presidential campaigns of Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Ken's experience with politics and strategy in combination with his academic training for unbiased and non-partisan analysis of research and current events, keeps him at the forefront of the political sphere.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Hillary Clinton tunes out the trolls in Facebook forum

San Francisco Chronicle: Hillary Clinton tunes out the trolls in Facebook forum | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The difference between online public forums and in-person public forums made itself jaw-droppingly clear Monday when Hillary Rodham Clinton threw herself out to the wide world on Facebook for a question-and-answer session.


The former first lady and secretary of state, usually surrounded by handlers at live events, found herself peppered in the Internet universe with questions about her breast size, sex habits, and whether she'd rather fight a horse or a duck.


Amid the bilge were plenty of serious, sometimes erudite queries on Israel, the Citizens United ruling and abortion rights - many of which the possible 2016 presidential candidate answered carefully and without making news. [via @sfchronicle]

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"There's no screen," Ken Goldstein, political professor at the University of San Francisco, noted dryly.


"This book tour is a mini-launch for a presidential campaign, and practice for a presidential campaign," Goldstein said. "This is spring training for her."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Ken Goldstein is a professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco and Faculty Director of the USF in DC program. He also teaches in USF's Masters' Program in Public Affairs, which focuses on the skills needed to run a modern political campaign.

Goldstein is one of the country's premier experts on the use and impact of political advertising. He has authored or co-authored four books, and scores of refereed journal articles and book chapters. These publications on political advertising, voter turnout, survey methodology, presidential elections, Israeli politics, and news coverage have appeared in top line political science journals and major university presses as well as in refereed law and medical journals.

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Contra Costa Times: Drummond - Quan Cellphone Saga All Heat, No Fire

Contra Costa Times: Drummond - Quan Cellphone Saga All Heat, No Fire | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Last week we entered week five of cellphone gate.


I'm talking about the hubbub over Oakland Mayor Jean Quan's June 8 car accident and questions swirling around whether Quan, who was driving a city-issued Lexus SUV, was talking on her cellphone without a headset when the collision occurred. That, of course, would be breaking the law.


Quan has repeatedly said that she was not talking or texting. Lakisha Lovely, the other driver, says the mayor is not telling the truth. According to her, Quan was talking on her cellphone and ran a red light, causing the crash. Four months earlier, Quan had been convicted in traffic court of running a red light in Newark. According to the Department of Motor Vehicles' records, Lovely had a clean driving record at the time of the collision. [via @cctimes]

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"She started to parse her language, which raised more questions than she needed to," says Corey Cook, a political science professor at the University of San Francisco.


"It's the standard critique of her since she has been elected. She doesn't accept responsibility."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on RacePresidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research.


He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation. 

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Money Crashers: 10 Best Cities for Food Trucks and Quick, Cheap Eats

Money Crashers: 10 Best Cities for Food Trucks and Quick, Cheap Eats | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Some parts of the country have a longer relationship with food trucks – or their predecessors – than others. The first mobile kitchen, the chuckwagon, catered to cattle drivers on the High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma from the mid-19th century onwards. In urban areas, the first food carts sold hearty meals to third-shift workers, long after regular restaurants had closed for the night. New York’s ubiquitous hot dog carts are remnants of this past as well. And starting in the mid-20th century, taco trucks – serving cheap, homestyle food to the region’s booming Latino community – appeared in southern California cities.


Another Los Angeles original, the Kogi Korean BBQ truck, is widely credited with re-energizing the food truck movement. This truck uses social media marketing to alert followers to its ever-changing location, as Twitter and Facebook are now key marketing tools for many food truck operators. Once the value proposition – high-quality, relatively healthy, and often unique food at a reasonable cost – became clear, urban foodies clamored for more.

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4. San Francisco

Food trucks are increasingly important to San Francisco’s legendary food scene – and a welcome alternative to the business district’s pricey restaurants. The city has about 200 active trucks, with many more in nearby Bay Area communities. Many cluster near the Embarcadero and along the Market Street corridor, but the University of San Francisco, San Francisco General Hospital, and AT&T Park (during Giants home games) are popular too. The city’s sophisticated food culture rewards experimentation, and its high student population and vibrant nightlife encourage many trucks to remain open well after dinner hours. [via @moneycrashers]

University of San Francisco's insight:

The University of San Francisco is located in the heart of one of the world's most innovative and stunning cities and is home to a vibrant academic community of students and faculty who achieve excellence in their fields. Its diverse student body enjoys direct access to faculty, small classes, and outstanding opportunities in the city itself. USF is San Francisco’s first university, and its Jesuit Catholic mission helps ignite a student's passion for social justice and a desire to “Change the World from Here.” For more information, please visit www.usfca.edu.

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San Francisco Chronicle: How '6 Californias' creates a state of confusion

San Francisco Chronicle: How '6 Californias' creates a state of confusion | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Voters competence have a possibility “to reboot and modernise a state government,” if Silicon Valley try entrepreneur Tim Draper’s devise to apart California into 6 states creates a Nov 2016 ballot, though a rich investor’s prophesy of California’s destiny is longer on unrestrained than on details.


“We are prepared to make a change,” Draper pronounced Tuesday as he delivered 44,000 of a estimated 1.3 million signatures collected for his inherent amendment to a Sacramento County registrar of voters. “We’re saying, make one unwell supervision into 6 good states.”

...

Working out those troubles, however, can cause more difficulties than the Six Californias initiative was designed to solve, said Corey Cook, an associate professor of politics at the University of San Francisco.


"It's a solution in search of a problem," he said of Draper's plan. "There's a mythology that this just provides a fresh start, but how do you disentangle 150 years of fiscal controls and arrangements?" [via @sfchronicle]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on RacePresidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research.


He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation. 

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CNN Money: IPO market achieves liftoff

CNN Money: IPO market achieves liftoff | USF in the News | Scoop.it
Timing is everything, even on Wall Street.

A whopping 89 companies held initial public offerings on U.S. exchanges from April to the end of June. That was the hottest quarter for IPOs since 2007, according to a report released Thursday by PricewaterhouseCoopers.

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The growth of the IPO market should trickle down to startups scouring New York and Silicon Valley for investments from venture capitalists.


"A strong IPO market is the life blood of the venture capital industry as it provides an exit alternative and liquidity for venture investments in early stage growth companies," said Mark Cannice, a professor at the University of San Francisco.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Mark V. Cannice, Ph.D. is an internationally recognized scholar, teacher, and speaker on entrepreneurship and venture capital. He is Department Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation with the University of San Francisco School of Management.

Dr. Cannice writes the widely-followed quarterly Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index Report® which is published by ProQuest and EBSCO, carried globally on Bloomberg Professional Services in 125 countries (Bloomberg ticker symbol: SVVCCI), and has been referenced in the Economist, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Xinhua News Service, Der Speigel, CNBC, National Public Radio, and many other media. He has written similar quarterly reports on the Chinese venture capital industry, China Venture Capitalist Confidence Index Report™ (Bloomberg ticker symbol: CVCCI).

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KQED: A School Built Entirely Around the Love of Math

KQED: A School Built Entirely Around the Love of Math | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Prodigies in piano or dance can study at schools like Juilliard to develop their musical or performing arts talent. By contrast, nothing like Juilliard exists for children who show great promise at math. But an ambitious experiment will soon change that: In fall 2015, a small, independent school that’s exclusively tailored for math whizzes will open in downtown San Francisco.

Designers of the new, non-profit Proof School intend to provide mathematically gifted youth an intensive and complete education in grades 6-12 that typical schools can’t muster. The pupils will learn advanced areas of math, such as number theory topics that a university math major or graduate student might tackle. They’ll work on math research projects, and engage in community service through math tutoring.


“They’re going to be involved in math in a really different way, a really exciting and dynamic way,” said Sam Vandervelde, who is leaving his math professorship at St. Lawrence University in New York to become the new school’s dean of mathematical sciences.


Proof School will initially open with roughly 45 children in three grades, with plans to grow to around 250 students in a decade. Getting in won’t be easy, but the school’s mission is to serve the needs of “math kids” in the Bay Area — ranging from high-IQ wunderkind types to students who participate in math competitions or math circles, to children who love to play with numbers. “What we want is kids who are passionate about math,” said Paul Zeitz, school co-founder and chair of mathematics at the University of San Francisco. [via @kqed]

University of San Francisco's insight:
Originally trained as an ergodic theorist (Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, 1992), today my overriding interest is mathematical problem solving and the promulgation of an Eastern European-inspired problem-solving culture to American audiences.
Towards this end, I wrote The Art and Craft of Problem Solving in 1998, co-founded the Bay Area Mathematical Olympiad in 1999, and co-founded the San Francisco Math Circle in 2005. In 2009 I produced a series of video lectures for The Teaching Company on problem solving.

 

Also, in 2013, I began planning a new independent school for children in grades 6--12 who love math, called Proof School.  The school will open in Fall 2015 and be located in downtown San Francisco and will feature a unique, innovative world-class curriculum.  

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KTVU-TV: Eric Cantor's loss raises questions over future of GOP

KTVU-TV: Eric Cantor's loss raises questions over future of GOP | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Republicans in Washington are regrouping after Virginia congressman Eric Cantor announced he will be relinquishing his number two leadership role in the House of Representatives.


Political observers say Cantor's defeat in an open primary Tuesday night is likely a case of a politician who forgot where he came from.

...


"Who knows, but we will be trying. I’ll tell you that for sure," said Liberty.

Professor Taylor says Cantor is among the Republican Party's top fundraisers so his loss will be felt on a national level.


The jockeying to replace Cantor as majority leader is underway.

 House Republicans plan to vote on their leadership team next Thursday.

Cantor has thrown his support behind Congressman Kevin McCarthy of Bakersfield.


The Republican Party will have to hold another vote after November's mid-term election.

University of San Francisco's insight:

James Lance Taylor is author of the book Black Nationalism in the United States: From Malcolm X to Barack Obama, which earned 2011 "Outstanding Academic Title" -Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries (January 2012). 


He is associate professor and Chair of the Department of Politics at the University of San Francisco. His undergraduate degree is from Pepperdine University and his graduate degrees were earned at the University of Southern California (USC). He has taught previously as a Visiting Associate Professor of political science at Saint Louis University in Madrid, Spain and political science and African American Studies at University of California, Berkeley.

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USA Today: O'Bannon trial Day 5- Division I revenues focus of testimony

USA Today: O'Bannon trial Day 5- Division I revenues focus of testimony | USF in the News | Scoop.it

More technical economic testimony was in store Friday on Day 5 of the Ed O'Bannon class-action antitrust trial against the NCAA.


First on the stand was Daniel Rascher, director of academic programs for the Sport Management Program at the University of San Francisco.

Rascher, a witness for the plaintiffs, testified about finances of Division I athletic programs, especially football and men's basketball revenues and expenses.


Rascher has data showing $1.3 billion surplus for football at BCS schools for 2012-13. Rascher said Division-I schools earned $6.4 billion in total broadcast revenue from '05-06 to '10-11.

Among the points Rascher made: The NCAA basketball tournament is more popular than NBA Finals, and it generates more ad revenue than many other sports events.


Rascher said that NHL team median revenue is $80.5 million. About 10 college athletic programs exceeded that in '12-13, he said.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Rascher is Professor and Director of Academic Programs for the Sport Management Program at the University of San Francisco, where he has taught sports economics and finance, business research methods, and master's project. As President of SportsEconomics, his clients have included organizations involved in the NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, MLS, PGA, NCAA, AHL, sports media, minor league baseball, Formula One racing, CART, Premier League Football, local sports commissions, and various government agencies. He has authored articles for academic and professional journals, book chapters, and a text book in the sport management and economics fields, has been interviewed hundreds of times by the media for his opinion on various aspects of the business of sports, and has given over fifty presentations at professional and academic conferences.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Chiu far outpaces Campos in Assembly race fundraising

San Francisco Chronicle: Chiu far outpaces Campos in Assembly race fundraising | USF in the News | Scoop.it

With three months left before the election, Supervisor David Chiu has 25 times the cash on hand as his opponent in the race to represent San Francisco's 17th Assembly District - $500,000 to Supervisor David Campos's $20,000.


While Chiu was seen at the beginning as the clear front runner in the race to replace longtime San Francisco politician Tom Ammiano in Sacramento, the vast disparity between their fundraising numbers is surprising, said University of San Francisco political science professor Corey Cook - especially given Campos' strong showing in the June primary.


Chiu received 48 percent of the vote to Campos' 44 percent in the primary - and because of California's top-two primary system, in which the biggest vote getters claim a spot in the general election, both Democrats proceeded to the November ballot. [via @sfchronicle]

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Cook said the chasm will make it difficult for Campos, a more liberal politician, to turn out the voters he will need to win in November. Cook, cautioned, however, that it's just "one data point" and said he's not ready to call the race for Chiu.


"I would have assumed it would be a lot closer," Cook said. "It's going to be very difficult for Campos - in general for progressives, you need an investment in a ground game to turn out and mobilize voters." The fundraising figures, made public Thursday, detail contributions and spending through June 30, the period immediately before and after the June primary.


University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on RacePresidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research.


He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation. 

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New York Times: A Long Slate of Mayoral Candidates Hints at a Rapidly Changing Oakland

New York Times: A Long Slate of Mayoral Candidates Hints at a Rapidly Changing Oakland | USF in the News | Scoop.it

OAKLAND, Calif. — There were 19 candidates on the scorecard for the mayoral forum at the Acts Full Gospel Church here last month. Fourteen of them actually showed up, primed to speak about their plans for public safety and job development, far in advance of the election in November. They are seeking to unseat the incumbent, Mayor Jean Quan, one of the few familiar faces on the panel. As for the others, it was sometimes hard to keep track.


“There’s too many of you all,” an organizer griped, asking the candidates to keep their responses short and identify themselves often. “We are not remembering your names.”


The audience, all pastors, marked their scorecards to help evaluate the candidates, whose diversity mirrors that of the city they hope to represent: African-American, Asian-American, Christian, Jewish, gay, straight, marijuana promoter and marijuana abstainer. Oakland, across the bay from San Francisco and adjacent to Berkeley, has long been a hotbed of political and social activism, but even here, the booming number of mayoral contenders hints at a swiftly changing region and a potentially pivotal battle on Election Day. [via @nytimes]

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Up for grabs, perhaps, is the city’s newest demographic: the creative and tech class — the gentrifiers. “It seems like this could be a defining election,” said Corey Cook, a political scientist at the University of San Francisco, “where you start to see a clear political coalition emerge.”


Dr. Cook, who has studied the Oakland political scene and its voting system, known as ranked choice, added that, with its racial and ethnic mix, the city could serve as a national model. “These midsize, formerly industrial cities that are trying to grow their tech base in an equitable way, deal with housing and crime and incredible economic development opportunities, that’s something that resonates across the country,” he said.


Still, a recent poll put Ms. Quan in the lead. And if there are still more than a dozen choices on Election Day, it could help the mayor, said Dr. Cook, the political scientist. His take: “What you have is an incumbent who’s likely to win because of the dispersal of other votes.”



University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on RacePresidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research.


He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation. 

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U.S. News & World Report: Most International Students | Rankings | Top National Universities

U.S. News & World Report: Most International Students | Rankings | Top National Universities | USF in the News | Scoop.it

International students can add diversity to a college or university, enriching the experience of other students on campus. Schools with a strong global presence often have a wealth of cultural groups and events, allowing international students an opportunity to share their food, music and traditions with their U.S. peers. International students attending one of the schools listed below may also benefit from a large foreign community when trying to acclimate to American life. These colleges reported the highest percentage of their students who were international in the 2012-2013 academic year. [via @usnews]

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The University of San Francisco is ranked #9 among universities with the largest percentage of international undergrads in fall 2012. U.S. News reports that 16 percent of our 6,344 undergrad enrollments were international students. 


University of San Francisco's insight:

The University of San Francisco is located in the heart of one of the world's most innovative and stunning cities and is home to a vibrant academic community of students and faculty who achieve excellence in their fields. Its diverse student body enjoys direct access to faculty, small classes, and outstanding opportunities in the city itself. USF is San Francisco’s first university, and its Jesuit Catholic mission helps ignite a student's passion for social justice and a desire to “Change the World from Here.” For more information, please visit www.usfca.edu.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Supervisors' soda tax vote isn't good omen for backers

San Francisco Chronicle: Supervisors' soda tax vote isn't good omen for backers | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The debate at the Board of Supervisors over whether to tax sodas was so heated and fiery (for this congenial iteration of the board anyway), everybody could have used a cool, refreshing can of Coke.


Diet Coke, people! Jeez.

In all seriousness, Tuesday's surprisingly close vote of 6-4 in favor of placing a soda tax on the November ballot does not bode particularly well for supporters of the measure.


For starters, it shows what a challenge they'll have persuading the necessary two-thirds of voters to agree to levy a 2-cents-per-ounce surcharge on sugary drinks. They couldn't even muster the support of two-thirds of their colleagues, who had little to lose by agreeing to let voters decide. Supervisor John Avalos, a soda tax supporter, was absent, but even a 7-4 vote isn't quite two-thirds. [via @sfchronicle]

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Corey Cook, a political science professor at the University of San Francisco, said the strategy has been in place for at least 20 years and will surely be used to fight November's ballot measure.

"It's something I'm sure we're going to see," he said.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on RacePresidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research.


He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation. 

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San Francisco Chronicle: S.F. changing employee rules after Avalos affair

San Francisco Chronicle: S.F. changing employee rules after Avalos affair | USF in the News | Scoop.it

San Francisco's elected officials are allowed to have romantic relationships with people they supervise and keep the affairs secret - but that's about to change.


Officials in the city's Department of Human Resources will soon revise the employee handbook that governs the conduct of city workers to specify that elected officials must report affairs with subordinates to a third party.


The change comes after the revelation that Supervisor John Avalos had an affair with his legislative aide, Raquel Redondiez. She is now on unpaid leave from her $95,082-a-year position. [via @sfchronicle]

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Corey Cook, a political science professor at the University of San Francisco, said elected officials having affairs with subordinates is nothing new and pointed out perhaps the most famous case: President Bill Clinton and intern Monica Lewinsky.


"It's pretty clear the public holds elected officials to higher standards than they hold other employees," Cook said. "Any perception that you'd have employment standards that apply differently to elected officials isn't something that's going to be well received by the public."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on RacePresidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research.


He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation. 

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San Francisco Chronicle: Obama lands in Bay Area, draws criticism for trip

San Francisco Chronicle: Obama lands in Bay Area, draws criticism for trip | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Both President Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton are in the Bay Area Wednesday, but don't expect the two most prominent Democrats in the country to cross paths on their separate trips - where she's getting the buzz, and he's getting the blowback.


Clinton, who is considering a 2016 White House bid, has made headlines with a jam-packed Bay Area schedule this week, ranging from stops at social media kings Google, Facebook and Twitter on Monday to her planned appearance Wednesday at a children's education event in Oakland.


Meanwhile, Obama's 18th visit to the Bay Area as president - an in-and-out fundraising stop - is handing GOP opponents an opportunity to needle him for hitting up wealthy donors for contributions at a time of international crises. [via @sfchronicle]

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Ken Goldstein, University of San Francisco professor of politics, said Obama is simply doing what has been de rigueur for Democratic candidates for years: "You come to California and the Bay Area to raise a lot of money from the people in new media, so you can spend it on old media in battleground states."


"With Hillary, she's doing a book tour, which is a soft launch and a little practice for what's looking like a presidential run," Goldstein said. "She's traveling the country, she's going from place to place, and she's doing public events.


"Barack Obama isn't ever going to be on the ballot again, and Hillary Clinton may be on the ballot," he said. "So it makes no sense for Barack Obama to talk to real people - and it makes real sense for her to talk to real people."


University of San Francisco's insight:

Ken Goldstein is a professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco and Faculty Director of the USF in DC program. He also teaches in USF's Masters' Program in Public Affairs, which focuses on the skills needed to run a modern political campaign.

Goldstein is one of the country's premier experts on the use and impact of political advertising. He has authored or co-authored four books, and scores of refereed journal articles and book chapters. These publications on political advertising, voter turnout, survey methodology, presidential elections, Israeli politics, and news coverage have appeared in top line political science journals and major university presses as well as in refereed law and medical journals.

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Bloomberg Businessweek: All in the Family

Bloomberg Businessweek: All in the Family | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Growing up in a tight-knit Italian-American family, Marcus Benedetti knew those ties would one day lead him toward taking over Petaluma-based Clover Stornetta Farms.


"I always did think that after seeing my dad and grandfather talk business around the fireplace," Benedetti said. "I wanted that relationship with my dad that he had with his father."


Those dreams came true in 2006, when at the age of 30 Benedetti succeeded his father, Dan, as president of the privately held business founded by his grandfather in 1977. He became CEO in 2010. [via @bw]

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A strong governance structure with clear lines of responsibilities among family members can make a big difference, said Monika Hudson, director of the Gellert Family Business Resource Center at the University of San Francisco.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Assistant Professor Monika Hudson successfully blends professional experience in the public sector with deep community involvement, teaching and research. She brings to life USF's commitment to provide students with challenging academic programs, preparing them to activate positive change in the workplace and in society. Her fields of expertise include entrepreneurship, organizational behavior, management and all aspects of public administration.


As one of the USF's leading instructors providing undergraduates with service learning opportunities, she has actively brought on board more than 100 Bay Area organizations to participate in service learning programs. In addition, Dr. Hudson provides leadership for the Public Service Internship Program, in which students are given a scholarship or stipend to address areas of need in the community. She also directs the USF's Gellert Family Business Center to provide strategic and practical business knowledge to family businesses to promote successful next generation leadership.


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Huffington Post: These States Are Scrambling To Adopt New Education Standards

Huffington Post: These States Are Scrambling To Adopt New Education Standards | USF in the News | Scoop.it

States that drop the Common Core State Standards face the prospect of less time to create new academic standards, and under intense political pressure. 


Generally, states have years to review content standards and make major changes if state school board members, those usually charged with ultimate approval of content standards, and others feel it's necessary. The process usually involves lengthy discussions, drafts, and revisions overseen by teachers at each grade level, as well as content-area experts and others who try to ensure the standards connect across grade levels.


But those features of standards-development may be significantly affected--and reduced--if states have to shift more quickly than normal to new standards.

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States in such a situation shouldn't act as if "the sky is falling," given their prior work on standards, but the process is time-intensive and could limit what they will be able to develop, said Patrick Murphy, a professor of politics at the University of San Francisco who studies state education departments. [via @huffingtonpost]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Patrick Murphy, Professor in the Department of Politics, is a Senior Fellow and Director of Research at the Public Policy Institute of California, a non-partisan think tank. Murphy received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a Master's of Public Affairs degree from the University of Texas-Austin. He received his B.A. from the University of Notre Dame. His professional experience prior to coming to USF includes teaching as a lecturer at the University of Wisconsin. Professor Murphy also has worked for the RAND Corporation and at the Office of Management and Budget in Washington, D.C. From 2004 to 2009, Murphy served as the Director of USF's McCarthy Center for Public Service.
 

Professor Murphy teaches in the areas of public administration, public policy and American politics. His research focuses on public management and public policy issue, and he has co-authored several reports and articles on the problems of illicit drug use, the management of drug policy, and the economics of drug selling. In recent years, Murphy's research has focused on education policy. He has collaborated with the Center for Reinventing Public Education at the University of Washington on the role of state education agencies in improving student outcomes.

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San Jose Mercury News: Minor league pay- Baseball's antitrust exemption allows for poverty wages

San Jose Mercury News: Minor league pay- Baseball's antitrust exemption allows for poverty wages | USF in the News | Scoop.it

With the draft over, major-league baseball's new crop of prospects are signing contracts and heading off to the minor leagues. All will receive a monthly salary less than the federal minimum wage. Yes, handsome signing bonuses will be given to those taken in the top few rounds, but the rest will get little.

Lately, a class-action lawsuit threatened by three ex-minor-leaguers is finally drawing attention to professional baseball's exploited and impoverished lower class.


Ted Berg, in USA Today, decried minor leaguers earning less than half that of fast food workers; in Slate Magazine, Lucas Mann wrote of their "microscopic paychecks" and the "obscene" amount of hours they are expected to work, and Michael McCann, in Sports Illustrated, lumped them with "working poor" while assessing the legal arguments for the lawsuit.

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George Gmelch is professor of anthropology at the University of San Francisco and at Union College. He has written a dozen books including a forthcoming memoir, "Wild Pitch: Coming of Age in Baseball in the 60s." He wrote this for this newspaper. [via @mercurynews]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Gmelch is Professor of Anthropology at the University of San Francisco. He did his undergraduate work at Stanford and his Ph.D. at UCSB. He is a cultural anthropologist who studies tourism, sport cultures, and migration. As an anthropologist he has also worked among Irish Travellers, English Gypsies, return migrants in Ireland and Newfoundland, commercial fishermen, Alaska natives, and Caribbean villagers and tourism workers. He has published 11 books and has also written widely for general audiences, including the New York Times, the Washington Post, Psychology Today, Society, and Natural History.

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USF’s Lane Center Welcomes Theology Scholar Lisa Fullam

USF’s Lane Center Welcomes Theology Scholar Lisa Fullam | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The University of San Francisco’s (USF) Joan and Ralph Lane Center for Catholic Studies and Social Thought is pleased to announce its 2014 Summer Scholar-in-Residence, Lisa Fullam, a distinguished theology scholar from Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley. Professor Fullam will lead this summer’s lecture series focusing on virtue ethics. The following three lectures are free, open to the public, and will take place in the Handlery Room on USF’s Lone Mountain (2800 Turk Blvd. in San Francisco).

  • Tuesday, July 7, 5-6:30 p.m.: Becoming Excellent: Reclaiming Virtue Ethics for Our Times
  • Tuesday, July 15, 5-6:30 p.m.: Excellent Sex: Applying Virtue Ethics for Sexual Ethics
  • Tuesday, July 22, 5-6:30 p.m.: Reclaiming Virtues: Humility in Teresa of Avila and Ignatius of Loyola

“The design of the summer scholar program is to provide a variety of voices and perspectives to the USF community by authors, academics, and practitioners who contribute to the Catholic Intellectual tradition,” said Mike Duffy, director of the Joan and Ralph Lane Center for Catholic Studies and Social Thought. “Lisa Fullam is just that. In conversations with her, we discussed some of the ways that Pope Francis has recently challenged the church and the world. In her three talks, Dr. Fullam will offer an opportunity to re-examine the role of ethics in the modern world.”

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San Francisco Bay Guardian: Boom asks "What's the matter with San Francisco?" and offers insightful answers

San Francisco Bay Guardian: Boom asks "What's the matter with San Francisco?" and offers insightful answers | USF in the News | Scoop.it

“What’s the matter with San Francisco?” asks the Summer 2014 issue of the Boom: A Journal of California, a quarterly magazine produced by the University of California Press, tapping an amazing array of writers to explore the struggle for the soul of San Francisco that has captured such widespread media attention in the last year.

The question on its cover, which all of the articles in this beautifully produced 114-page magazine explore from varying perspectives, is a nod to Thomas Frank’s insightful 2004 book, What’s the matter with Kansas? And the answer in both cases, argue writers Eve Bachrach and Jon Christensen in their cover story article, is the people.
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Written by Rachel Brahinsky, a former Bay Guardian staff writer who is now a professor at the University of San Francisco, the article echoes other concerns about the threats and challenges facing San Francisco, but she finds a potential “seed of the solution” in the city’s current zeitgeist.


For one thing, she challenges the convenient blaming of “techies” for the problems facing San Francisco, noting that some of the city’s best progressive organizing has been done by those with skills and/or jobs in the technology sector, often by people who despise the corporate managers and investors who run the industry as much as outsiders do.

“The problem isn’t tech, but corporate tech,” she writes. [via @sfbg]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Rachel Brahinsky serves as Faculty Director of the Master's Program in Urban Affairs. She received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley; her doctoral research focused on the history of racial politics and re-development in San Francisco. Dr. Brahinsky's current research centers on race, gender and politics in American cities. Prior to graduate studies, Brahinsky's journalist career included articles on homelessness, city planning and urban politics. She currently holds a position with the Living New Deal Project in Berkeley as postdoctoral fellow and Managing Director.

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Associated Press: Players could make big money under plan

Associated Press: Players could make big money under plan | USF in the News | Scoop.it

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Football players at big schools could make several hundred thousand dollars in their college careers if they were paid a portion of the broadcast rights to games similar to what NFL players now get, under a model suggested by a sports economist.

Basketball players would do even better, with some earning more than $1 million over four years if schools split their broadcast revenues equally with athletes. That figure could rise even higher as billions of dollars in new television contracts for the rights to games are negotiated.

University of San Francisco economist Daniel Rascher testified Friday that the figures are at the high end of his model because they come close to the 55 percent of broadcast revenue the NFL shares with its players. He pointed out on the witness stand that he did other models that would give players as little as 10 percent of revenues if they were allowed to share in broadcast rights.

Rascher's testimony came under cross examination in a landmark antitrust trial brought in federal court against the NCAA by former UCLA basketball star Ed O'Bannon and 19 others. They are seeking an injunction that would allow players to band together and sell the rights to their names, images and likenesses (NILs), with the money likely being put in a trust fund and given to them after they leave college.

Just how much that money would be would likely be the subject of long negotiations and other court fights. The NCAA has already indicated it will take the take the issue all the way to the Supreme Court if it loses in a bench trial before U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken, saying current model of "amateurism" is the best for both the football and Division I basketball players as well as the thousands of other athletes in other college sports.

On a trial day dominated by talk about big money, Rascher spent nearly five hours on the stand laying out — and then defending — his studies on behalf of the plaintiffs. Most of them centered on how much money is being made in college sports and Rascher's contention that colleges would not be hurt if they used some of the money now spend on facilities and coach's salaries to pay athletes.

"We've seen the NCAA change its rules over decades on how much they should be paying athletes," he said. "The fanaticism and the demand continue to rise during that time period."

He defended his studies against suggestions by NCAA attorneys that the competitive balance in college sports would be upset if the richer schools paid athletes more than the ones with smaller budgets, saying his research shows that athletes recruited by both big and medium-sized universities almost always go to the bigger school anyway.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Rascher is Professor and Director of Academic Programs for the Sport Management Program at the University of San Francisco, where he has taught sports economics and finance, business research methods, and master's project. As President of SportsEconomics, his clients have included organizations involved in the NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, MLS, PGA, NCAA, AHL, sports media, minor league baseball, Formula One racing, CART, Premier League Football, local sports commissions, and various government agencies. He has authored articles for academic and professional journals, book chapters, and a text book in the sport management and economics fields, has been interviewed hundreds of times by the media for his opinion on various aspects of the business of sports, and has given over fifty presentations at professional and academic conferences.

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