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Huffington Post: Here's The First College To Adopt Callisto, A New Rape Reporting System

Huffington Post: Here's The First College To Adopt Callisto, A New Rape Reporting System | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The University of San Francisco announced today it will become the first higher education institution to implement Callisto, a new online reporting system for campus sexual assaults.
 

Callisto, designed by the nonprofit organization Sexual Health Innovations, is a third-party online reporting system designed for colleges using input from rape survivors. 
 

The system allows an alleged victim to hold back on submitting their report unless someone else reports the same assailant, or to save their file with a timestamp and come back at a later point to turn in their report. Sexual Health Innovations hopes the system can get more victims to come forward, identify serial perpetrators and mitigate responses by school or law enforcement officials that may exacerbate trauma experienced by a victim.


"Millennials are much more accustomed to finding things online," said Peter Novak, vice provost of student life at USF. "It doesn't negate their coming to a real person, but at least it gives them some assistance and help before they do so." [via @HuffingtonPost]

...

"The data we'll get from Callisto will really help us hone in on our own prevention efforts," Novak said. 
 

Callisto will launch at USF in the fall, as will the university's campus climate survey. USF will still have in-person reporting options and confidential counseling available for campus assault.


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San Francisco Chronicle: An appreciation of John Nash - What a beautiful mind left behind

San Francisco Chronicle: An appreciation of John Nash - What a beautiful mind left behind | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The death of John Nash and his wife, Alicia, from a tragic automobile accident in New Jersey on Saturday stunned those of us who study and teach game theory as well as millions outside the academy inspired by his remarkable life. The widespread empathy for sufferers of mental illness elicited by Nash’s story, told in the film “A Beautiful Mind,” helped bring the issue to the forefront of the public agenda. But many outside academia remain unfamiliar with the earth-shattering contribution of Nash in our ability to model and understand human behavior.


Although Nash was a mathematician, it was the social sciences that he revolutionized. And his contribution to the social sciences was truly revolutionary, comparable to that of Louis Pasteur’s breakthrough in germ theory, or to Gregor Mendel’s development of genetics. [via @sfchronicle]

...

Bruce Wydick is a professor of economics at the University of San Francisco and author of “Games in Economic Development” (Cambridge University Press, 2007). Follow him on his blog at www.acrosstwoworlds.net and on Twitter @BruceWydick.


University of San Francisco's insight:

Areas of research specialization are in the use of econometric, experimental, and game-theoretic tools to analyze the impact of development programs, especially in the areas of microfinance, education, and health. Professor Wydick's recent work examines the impact of development programs including microfinance, child sponsorship, and animal donation programs. Other recent work studies the role of hope and aspirations in escaping poverty traps. His academic publications have appeared in the Journal of Political Economy, Economic Journal, Economica, Oxford Economic Papers, Journal of Development EconomicsWorld Development, Economic Development and Cultural Change and other journals. His recent study on the impact of child sponsorship has been the subject of stories by the BBC World ServiceUSA Today, the San Francisco Chronicle, and other media outlets. He writes for Christianity TodayPRISM, and is a regular contributor to op-ed columns for San Francisco Bay Area newspapers. His book Games In Economic Development is published by Cambridge University Press, and his forthcoming book about the lives of coffee growers in Guatemala is forthcoming from Thomas Nelson (HarperCollins). Professor Wydick serves as the director of Mayan Partners, a small faith-based non-profit organization working in the western highlands of Guatemala and as faculty advisor for the InterVarsity Christian Fellowship at USF.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Former USF president remembered as ‘truly a person for others’

San Francisco Chronicle: Former USF president remembered as ‘truly a person for others’ | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Father John Lo Schiavo, as beloved a college president as ever there was, was remembered Tuesday as a “rock star” who “had thousands of friends way before Facebook.”
 

“He was truly a person for others,” recalled his cousin, retired Superior CourtJudge Lynn Duryee. “He did so much for so many.”
 

In her eulogy at Lo Schiavo’s funeral on Tuesday inside St. Ignatius Church on the USF campus, Duryee asked mourners to stand if they had ever been married, baptized, received a letter of recommendation or attended a funeral presided over by the Jesuit priest. Nearly all of the 500 mourners — including former San Francisco mayors Frank Jordan and Gavin Newsom — were on their feet. [via @sfchronicle]

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The priest, also known as “Big John” and “Lo,” was remembered by university chancellor the Rev. Stephen Privett as a superb fundraiser for USF. It was Lo Schiavo who, as president, led the university out of a dire financial predicament in the 1970s through an aggressive solicitation campaign and a revamped accounting system. Five years after LoSchiavo became president, donations hit in record amounts and USF was able to purchase the Lone Mountain College property and add a wing to the law school.
 

“John somehow always found the funds,” Privett said. “He was committed to providing opportunity to the deserving rather than further advantage to the already privileged.”

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San Francisco Chronicle: Not all college coaches fans of proposed hoops rule changes

San Francisco Chronicle: Not all college coaches fans of proposed hoops rule changes | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Proposed rule changes in men’s college basketball are being generally well received among Bay Area coaches, but USF’s Rex Walters thinks one new wrinkle — the 30-second shot clock — is an example of “the big schools dictating what they want.”


The 30-second clock, down from 35, is one of several changes recommended by the NCAA men’s basketball rules committee for next season. The move, pending approval next month by the NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel, is mostly designed to speed up the game and increase scoring.


“Honestly, I think it’s BCS (schools) dictating what they want,” Walters said. “If there are more possessions in a game, it always is going to help bigger, more talented teams. … This gives them a better chance to beat teams that will slow it down.”

[via @sfchronicle]

...

The changes need to be approved by the NCAA playing rules oversight panel, which is scheduled to discuss them in a conference call June 8.
 

Walters said he prefers a quick tempo and doesn’t think the new clock will affect his Dons much. He said he’s heard that nationally, only 3 percent of possessions would have been affected by the five-second reduction.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Rex Walters continues to put his stamp on one of college basketball’s most storied programs. In seven seasons on the Hilltop, the former Kansas standout has guided the Dons to a 112-112 record, three postseason appearances and a pair of 20-win seasons. Included in his victory total are two wins over top-25 teams. His career record, which includes two seasons at Florida Atlantic, stands at 143-145.
 
The 2013-14 season was particularly noteworthy, as the Dons finish with a 21-12 record, tie for second in the West Coast Conference with a 13-5 mark and earn a bid to the National Invitation Tournament. The 21 victories marked the Dons’ highest win total since the 1981-82 team posted a 25-6 record while their 13 conference victories were the most since the 1976-77 team went 14-0 in league play while spending most of the season ranked No. 1 in the nation.

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Huffington Post: How Mindfulness Can Defeat Racial Bias

Huffington Post: How Mindfulness Can Defeat Racial Bias | USF in the News | Scoop.it

When I was promoted to tenured full professor, the dean of my law school kindly had flowers sent to me at my home in Pacific Heights, an overpriced San Francisco neighborhood almost devoid of black residents. I opened the door to find a tall, young, African-American deliveryman who announced, “Delivery for Professor Magee.” I, a petite black woman, dressed for a simple Saturday spent in my own home, reached for the flowers saying, “I am Professor Magee.”
 

The deliveryman looked down at the order and back up at me. Apparently shaken from the hidden ground of his preconceptions, he looked at me again. Incredulous, he asked, “Are you sure?”

[via @huffingtonpost]

...

We are each reminded almost daily of the way that race intersects with judgment in our daily lives, leading to bad decisions and over-reactions—which in the context of criminal justice can have deadly consequences. As the story of my encounter with the black deliveryman indicates, none of us is immune: Black people may be as conditioned as anyone else by stereotypes and unconscious expectations. 
 

Is there a solution? Research shows that mindfulness practices help us focus, give us greater control over our emotions, and increase our capacity to think clearly and act with purpose. Might mindfulness assist police and other public servants in minimizing the mistaken judgments that lead to such harms? Might they help the rest of us—professors and deliverymen alike—minimize our biases as well?


Rhonda V. Magee, J.D., M.A. (Sociology), is Professor of Law at the University of San Francisco and a Visiting Scholar at the Berkeley Center for the Study of Law and Society. Her work-in-progress, The Way of ColorInsight: Understanding Race in Our Lives Through Mindfulness-Based ColorInsight, will be submitted for publication this year. She has previously written about the “flower deliveryman incident” using her full name at the time, Rhonda V. Magee Andrews.

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Metro US: Barnard likely to usher in transgender women

Metro US: Barnard likely to usher in transgender women | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Barnard College is considering a new policy to officially make transgender women eligible for admission, following the lead of many other women’s colleges around the country and at a time when transgender women and men are increasingly in the media spotlight.
 

Over the last six months, Barnard has held a series of town hall style meetings for students, alumnae and faculty to debate the possibility of introducing a policy dealing with admissions for transgender women.
 

Caleb LoSchiavo, graduating this year with a major in psychology, applied to Barnard when they still identified as a woman. Since starting college, they came out as transgender and have since transitioned. They now identify as genderqueer, meaning not fitting strictly into the definition of male or female identity. [via @metro_us]

...

Professor Richard Johnson III studies LGBT issues at the University of San Francisco and has been keenly following the transgender policies unfolding around the country. He agrees that the momentum is at a point where Barnard is likely feeling the pressure to make a decision.
 

“I think honestly so many of them [the colleges] are late to the game,” said Johnson.
 

“You know I believe the matter of trans women has been on the docket of many colleges for the last several years. Perhaps because of the social context of schools such as Barnard some of them might have considered this a touchy issue, however you can't stop progress,” he said.

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Union Leader: Cellphone tracking - Require a warrant

Union Leader: Cellphone tracking - Require a warrant | USF in the News | Scoop.it

If the government can track your movements via your mobile phone, it can do more than know where you are at any given time. It can create a detailed personal profile capable of predicting your future movements. And yet we still do not require a warrant before the government can track you via an electronic device.

Thursday, the state Senate is to consider a bill that would write that warrant requirement into law. It is a must-pass bill.

How much information can a government agency obtain by tracking you via your phone or other electronic device?

“When the government has a record of everywhere we’ve gone on a continuous basis over a period of time, they know our religious beliefs, our health information, our associations, our political views, our most private activities,” Susan Freiwald, a law professor at the University of San Francisco, told National Journal earlier this month. [via @UnionLeader]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Professor Susan Freiwald publishes and presents widely in the areas of cyberlaw and information privacy. A former software developer, Freiwald has authored and co-authored amicus briefs in major cases involving electronic surveillance laws. She also regularly assists the Electronic Frontier Foundation with electronic surveillance litigation efforts and has served on the board of the Northern California American Civil Liberties Union.


Education

  • BA, Harvard University
  • JD, Harvard University
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Inside Higher Ed: U of San Francisco gives gaokao-based admissions a try in China

Inside Higher Ed: U of San Francisco gives gaokao-based admissions a try in China | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Chinese applicants to the University of San Francisco need not submit a transcript or an SAT score under a newly announced pilot program. Rather, the private Jesuit institution plans to admit students based on their scores on the grueling, multiday Chinese university entrance exam, the gaokao, and their performance in an in-person interview in Beijing.
 

Students admitted through this pathway will not be required to submit standardized English language test results, although USF plans to administer its own English language test during the interview, according to Stanley D. Nel, the university’s vice president for international relations.
 

Nel said his goal is not to flood the University of San Francisco with additional Chinese students -- USF enrolled more than 1,000 students from China last fall, including 846 undergraduates -- but rather to identify 5 to 10 top students who do well on the gaokao but not well enough to get into the Chinese university of their choice (the gaokao is far more central to admissions decisions in China than the SAT or ACT generally is in the U.S.).
[via @insidehighered]

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San Francisco Chronicle: I-280 teardown could lead to billion-dollar land rush

San Francisco Chronicle: I-280 teardown could lead to billion-dollar land rush | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Demo derby: Tuesday’s special — and special-interest-fueled — election for the state Senate in the the East Bay between Orinda Mayor Steve Glazer and state Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla has turned into a head-on collision between the business and labor sides of the Democratic Party.
 

And in an interesting twist, Republican voters, who are in the minority, could be the deciders.
 

“It’s the only show in town, and everyone is paying attention,” said Corey Cook, political science professor at the University of San Francisco.
 

Labor Democrats backing Bonilla are incensed that Glazer is getting help from independent expenditure committees funded by Republicans outside the district — but the fact is, both sides are courting the GOP vote. [vika @sfchronicle]



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New York Times: The Right Baits the Left to Turn Against Hillary Clinton

New York Times: The Right Baits the Left to Turn Against Hillary Clinton | USF in the News | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — A Twitter post recently caught the eye of Bill McKibben, the environmental advocate and godfather of the Keystone XL pipeline protests. It included an image from “The Simpsons” showing Homer and his family basking in mountains of cash in their living room, followed by a report on Hillary Rodham Clinton’s appearing at a fund-raiser with a lobbyist from the Keystone fight.
 

Mr. McKibben’s environmental organization, 350.org, has been trying to raise awareness about the ties it sees between lobbyists for the oil pipeline and former aides to Mrs. Clinton. He promptly shared the post with his 150,000 Twitter followers, and the reaction was immediate. [via @nytimes]

...

The new-style digital campaign captures some basic facts about 21st-century communication: Information travels at warp speed on social media, it is sometimes difficult to know where that information comes from, and most people like to read things with which they agree. The result, said Ken Goldstein, a professor of politics at the University of San Francisco who specializes in political advertising, is something more sophisticated.
 

“Politics is usually basic math,” he said, “and this is a little bit of calculus, thinking a couple steps ahead.”

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San Francisco Business Times: Former USF president, who rebuilt finances, blocked basketball, dies

San Francisco Business Times: Former USF president, who rebuilt finances, blocked basketball, dies | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Rev. John Lo Schiavo, a San Francisco native who led the University of San Francisco back from financial despair and suspended basketball program after a series of recruiting violations, died Friday at the infirmary of Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos, USF said.
 

He was 90. 

When elected as USF's 25th president in 1977, the iconic San Francisco university had a $1.7 million deficit and an endowment of only $4.6 million. Lo Schiavo, who began his career at USF as a philosophy instructor in 1950, launched a capital campaign that brought in close to $27 million by 1982 — then USF's largest fundraising program. The effort allowed USF to buy the Lone Mountain College property a block away in the North of the Panhandle neighborhood as well as add a wing to the School of Law's Kendrick Hall.

University of San Francisco's insight:
Fr. Lo Schiavo, who presided over a financial, academic, and co-curricular resurgence of the university, died peacefully on Friday, May 15, 2015 in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. 
Funeral Information
A Vigil Service will be held Monday, May 25 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church on the campus of the University of San Francisco at 650 Parker Avenue, San Francisco, 94118. 

A Requiem Mass (funeral) will be held at St. Ignatius on Tuesday, May 26 at 11 a.m., with a reception following. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/john-lo-schiavo/
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Los Angeles Times: John Lo Schiavo dies at 90; USF president terminated basketball program

Los Angeles Times: John Lo Schiavo dies at 90; USF president terminated basketball program | USF in the News | Scoop.it

When Queen Elizabeth II stopped in San Francisco on a U.S. tour in 1983, a tall, affable Jesuit priest stood in the receiving line to greet her at a formal event.


Father John Lo Schiavo, then president of the University of San Francisco, told the queen that he was honored to meet her. The queen, hearing his name, beckoned him closer so she could ask him a little something in private: "When are you going to bring back basketball?" whispered her majesty, head of the Commonwealth and defender of the faith.


Lo Schiavo (pronounced lo-skee-avo) had made global headlines by pulling the plug on his school's celebrated basketball program after the NCAA and several publications had found repeated ethical violations. [via @latimes]

University of San Francisco's insight:
Fr. Lo Schiavo, who presided over a financial, academic, and co-curricular resurgence of the university, died peacefully on Friday, May 15, 2015 in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. 

Funeral Information
A Vigil Service will be held Monday, May 25 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church on the campus of the University of San Francisco at 650 Parker Avenue, San Francisco, 94118. A Requiem Mass (funeral) will be held at St. Ignatius on Tuesday, May 26 at 11 a.m., with a reception following. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/john-lo-schiavo/
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Eventbrite Co-Founder & President Julia Hartz to Speak at USF’s Annual Women’s Leadership & Philanthropy Luncheon, May 15

Eventbrite Co-Founder & President Julia Hartz to Speak at USF’s Annual Women’s Leadership & Philanthropy Luncheon, May 15 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The University of San Francisco’s (USF) Women in Leadership & Philanthropy initiative is pleased to host Julia Hartz, co-founder and president of Eventbrite, the global ticketing and events marketplace, at USF’s second annual Women’s Leadership Luncheon on May 15 at the Four Seasons Hotel in San Francisco. Hartz will share her personal and professional journey as a technology entrepreneur, business executive, angel investor, partner, wife and mother.

 

By providing educational, networking, and leadership opportunities through USF, the mission of Women in Leadership & Philanthropy is to inspire, empower, and advance women to become transformative leaders in service of their communities and beyond.

 

“I’m thrilled to share the story of my journey in building Eventbrite, and what I’ve learned along the way as a working mother and entrepreneur,” said Julia Hartz, co-founder and president of Eventbrite.


For more information, please visit https://www.usfca.edu/Giving/women/

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Pacific Standard Magazine: One Woman's Quest to Fix the Process of Reporting Sexual Assault

Pacific Standard Magazine: One Woman's Quest to Fix the Process of Reporting Sexual Assault | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Jessica Ladd sat alone in a room while campus security called the cops. More than a year had passed since she was sexually assaulted. At the time of the assault, Ladd was a student at Pomona College, a small, wealthy liberal arts school in Southern California.
 

Now, Ladd finally felt ready to file a report on her assaulter—a friend, as it so often happens. But the process wasn’t going at all as she had planned, or at least had hoped. Fifteen long minutes dragged by, while thoughts of her assault and how little control she had over the situation now raced through her mind. Panic set in. “I felt like everything was spinning out of control,” Ladd says. “This situation, which was supposed to be empowering and the right thing to do, was rapidly devolving into one of the most traumatizing events of my life.” She didn’t want any other college students to have to go through what she did, so Ladd created the reporting process that she wished she had: an online tool called Callisto. [via @PacificStand]

...

This week, Sexual Health Innovations announced that the University of San Francisco will be the first of three initial participating universities to beta-test the system, what they’re calling the “founding institutions.” Similar anonymous reporting programs have had some success; after the Ashland, Oregon-based program You Have Options launched in 2013, the police department saw a 106-percent increase in the number of sexual assault reports. That’s a good sign for Callisto, but whether or not the online system can reduce campus sexual assaults by up to 90 percent by weeding out re-offenders—that’s Ladd’s stated goal—remains to be seen.


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CNBC Africa: S.Africa fingered in FIFA corruption scandal

CNBC Africa: S.Africa fingered in FIFA corruption scandal | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The world's most popular sport was plunged into turmoil after US and Swiss authorities announced separate inquiries into the activities of the game's powerful governing body, FIFA. The scandal includes allegations of corruption during South Africa's World Cup. To find out what this means for the beautiful game and sponsorship, CNBC Africa is joined by Dr Michael Goldman, an assistant professor of the Sport Management Programme at the University of San Francisco. [via @CNBCAfrica]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Michael Goldman is an Assistant Professor in the Sport Management Program at the University of San Francisco. He teaches Sport Marketing and Business Development & Sales on both campuses. Through his teaching, research and consulting activities in the business of sport, Michael has worked with leading soccer, rugby, and cricket sponsors, rights-holders, broadcasters and agencies in South Africa and Kenya.As a Senior Lecturer in Marketing at the University of Pretoria's Gordon Institute of Business Science since 2005, Michael designed, delivered and assessed post-graduate management courses on a number of academic and executive programmes, to managers from a wide range of companies, including PepsiCo, SABMiller Africa & Asia, Nokia Africa, Barclays, and Sasol.He is a regular media contributor on sport marketing issues and has published academically in the US, Europe and Africa.

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China Daily USA: Ministry pushing for acceptation of gaokao by overseas universities

China Daily USA: Ministry pushing for acceptation of gaokao by overseas universities | USF in the News | Scoop.it

An education official said Sunday that the Ministry of Education is pushing for the recognition of Chinese national college entrance exam, also known as gaokao, by more foreign universities, Beijing News reported.
 

Yu Jihai, deputy director of the international department of the Ministry of Education, said the plan is already underway although it will still take time before any results will be seen.
 

He said regular cultural and education exchanges between China and Russia, the US and the EU can be used to promote the acceptance of gaokao results by their universities. [via @ChinaDailyUSA]

...

Up to 60 percent of colleges and universities in Australia now accept gaokao results after the University of Sydney led the way in 2012.
 

Earlier this year, the University of San Francisco announced Chinese students applying to the university will only need to submit gaokao scores with no additional tests required.

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Huffington Post: The Greatest Love of All

Huffington Post: The Greatest Love of All | USF in the News | Scoop.it

It's graduation time at colleges and universities across our nation. As a member of the faculty of the University of San Francisco, I participated in some of this week's graduation ceremonies for students from USF's College of Arts and Sciences. 

[via @HuffingtonPost]

...

At the undergraduate commencement it was especially poignant to see and listen to the class valedictorian. He was a young, male Mexican-American student, Victor Casillas Valle, graduating summa cum laude (with a grade point average of 3.85) with a bachelor of arts in communications. He spoke to the faculty and students assembled in the majestic St. Ignatius Church in San Francisco, where the commencements took place.


I watched and listened to this young man's speech. I looked out at an audience of parents and friends of the graduating class of 2015 from USF's College of Arts and Science. I reflected on the demographics I saw: students of Latin American, Asian, white, and African-American backgrounds.


Persons who want to understand the effect of a broken Immigration system, the DREAM Act, and the importance of President Obama's executive actions to improve the system should go to a commencement at USF.


University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Jones is currently a Visiting Professor, University of San Francisco and a Scholar Writer in Residence, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research & Education Institute, Stanford University, and Palo Alto, CA.
 

In a distinguished and heralded career, Clarence B. Jones served as political advisor, counsel and draft speechwriter for the Reverend Dr, Martin Luther King, Jr., joined Sanford I. Weill and Arthur Levitt, Jr. in Carter, Berlind & Weill, Inc. as an Allied Member of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), becoming the "first African American " partner in a Wall Street investment banking firm, has been twice recognized as Fortune Magazine's "Business Man of the Month," and founded successful financial, corporate and media-related ventures. He has also provided strategic legal and financial consulting services to several governments around the world including The Bahamas, The Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and Zambia.

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San Francisco Chronicle: RBI uses baseball to lure schoolkids to reading

San Francisco Chronicle: RBI uses baseball to lure schoolkids to reading | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Harnessing kids’ passion for baseball in order to encourage their passion for reading is the aim of San Francisco RBI. The RBI program, nurtured here by Jim Messemer — in conjunction with Major League Baseball, with cooperation from the San Francisco Unified School District, and the help of volunteers and tutors from the University of San Francisco — uses ballplayers as role models and spokespeople. Giants pitchers-pals-mensches Matt Cain and Jeremy Affeldt were the star power at Monday night’s fundraising dinner, which, having doubled in size from last year’s event, raised a million bucks.


“If you see people of poverty and you have the ability to help alleviate it,” said Affeldt in an onstage discussion with Cain, “if you don’t do it, you’re not successful.” Jessica Aguirre of NBC Bay Area News ably moderated the conversation, which moved back and forth between the inspirational (“At the end of your career, it’s the respect of your teammates that’s going to be cherished,” said Cain) and the comedic (“One ring at a time” is how Affeldt said he puts on his World Series bling). [via @sfchronicle]

University of San Francisco's insight:

University of San Francisco President Paul J. Fitzgerald, S.J. serves on the board of San Francisco RBI: http://sfrbi.org/about/board-of-directors/

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New York Times: Rev. John Lo Schiavo Dies at 90; University President Barred Basketball

New York Times: Rev. John Lo Schiavo Dies at 90; University President Barred Basketball | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Rev. John Lo Schiavo, who spent 14 years as president of the University of San Francisco, notably making headlines when he took the rare step of suspending the men’s basketball program after repeated violations of National Collegiate Athletic Association rules, died on Friday in Los Gatos, Calif. He was 90.
 

The death was confirmed in an email by a spokeswoman for the university, Anne-Marie Devine Tasto, who said Father Lo Schiavo had dementia.
 

Father Lo Schiavo, a San Francisco native, was affiliated with the university, a Jesuit school, almost continuously for more than 60 years. He started as a philosophy instructor in 1950 and was later dean of students, vice president for student affairs, chairman of the board of trustees and rector of the university Jesuit community. A popular campus figure who was known as Father Lo, he was president from 1977 to 1991.
 

Nationally, Father Lo Schiavo is best known for his decision in 1982 to forgo the revenue, publicity and acclaim of the university’s successful men’s basketball program and instead stand up for institutional rectitude. His suspension of the program indefinitely was considered the first time a university had shut down a major sports program, without external pressure to do so, because of N.C.A.A. rules violations, some of which preceded his tenure.

University of San Francisco's insight:
Fr. Lo Schiavo, who presided over a financial, academic, and co-curricular resurgence of the university, died peacefully on Friday, May 15, 2015 in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. 
Funeral Information
A Vigil Service will be held Monday, May 25 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church on the campus of the University of San Francisco at 650 Parker Avenue, San Francisco, 94118. 

A Requiem Mass (funeral) will be held at St. Ignatius on Tuesday, May 26 at 11 a.m., with a reception following. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/john-lo-schiavo/
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Catholic San Francisco: USF mourns former president Jesuit Father John Lo Schiavo

Catholic San Francisco: USF mourns former president Jesuit Father John Lo Schiavo | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Former University of San Francisco president, Jesuit Father John Lo Schiavo, died May 15 at his community’s Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. The priest was 90 years old and entered the Society of Jesus in 1942.

Father Lo Schiavo was born in San Francisco and graduated from Star of the Sea School and the Jesuits’ St. Ignatius College Preparatory. He held undergraduate and graduate degrees in philosophy from the Jesuits’ Gonzaga University.

Father Lo Schiavo had a 65-year relationship with USF that began in 1950 as an instructor of philosophy. He later would serve in roles including dean of students and vice president of student affairs before being named the school’s 25th president in 1977. He served in the post until 1991.

During his administration, USF added a wing to the law school’s Kendrick Hall and purchased the Lone Mountain College property, now home to the Jesuits’ Loyola House, and was pivotal in funds raised for USF’s Koret Health and Recreation Center in 1989.

University of San Francisco's insight:
Fr. Lo Schiavo, who presided over a financial, academic, and co-curricular resurgence of the university, died peacefully on Friday, May 15, 2015 in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. 
Funeral Information
A Vigil Service will be held Monday, May 25 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church on the campus of the University of San Francisco at 650 Parker Avenue, San Francisco, 94118. 

A Requiem Mass (funeral) will be held at St. Ignatius on Tuesday, May 26 at 11 a.m., with a reception following. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/john-lo-schiavo/
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Scientific American: Gerard Kuiper's Daring Rescue of Max Planck at the End of World War II

Scientific American: Gerard Kuiper's Daring Rescue of Max Planck at the End of World War II | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In May of 1945, the American astronomer turned soldier Gerard Kuiper stood in the remnants of Nazi Germany. His keen eyes, normally trained on the heavens, looked across the Elbe River to the east. Germany had just surrendered, but the region was not yet at peace. Enemy soldiers and homeless refugees wandered lawlessly through rubble, seeking food. Meanwhile, sweeping from the east, the Red Army eagerly claimed its new lands. Kuiper had survived the war and completed top-secret assignments. So why would he volunteer for one last dangerous mission?

[via @sciam]

...

Brandon R. Brown is a Professor of Physics at the University of San Francisco. His research work has included measurements of vortex dynamics in high-temperature superconductors and biophysics studies of the electric sense in elasmobranchs. He is the author of Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken by War. His writing for general audiences has appeared in New Scientist, SEED, the Huffington Post, and other outlets. Follow on Twitter @TheDailyPlanck

University of San Francisco's insight:

Brandon Brown pursued doctoral training in superconductivity and low-temperature physics, with postdoctoral work in science communication. Once at the University of San Francisco, he shifted his research focus to sensory biophysics. His laboratory, his research students, and various collaborators have explored the electric and magnetic sensory abilities of a variety of creatures. Currently, he is completing a book about the life and work of German physicist Max Planck (1858-1947), to be published by Oxford University Press in 2015.  See his author page for more information.

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San Francisco Chronicle: John Lo Schiavo, former president who helped USF rebound, dies

San Francisco Chronicle: John Lo Schiavo, former president who helped USF rebound, dies | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Rev. John Lo Schiavo, former president and chancellor of the University of San Francisco, who presided over a financial and academic resurgence of the university — as well as a controversial shutdown of its basketball program over recruiting violations — died peacefully at age 90 at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos on Friday.
 

Born to Italian immigrants in 1925, the Rev. Lo Schiavo was very much a local kid, attending Star of the Sea Grammar School and St. Ignatius High School before joining the Society of Jesus in 1942, said his cousin, Gina Asaro Busalacchi, who remained close with him through his last years.
 

“He had a lot of charisma and compassion,” said Busalacchi, 61. “He had a twinkle in his eye, his smile was warm and friendly, and he went to bat for the people he loved.” [via @sfchronicle]

University of San Francisco's insight:
Fr. Lo Schiavo, who presided over a financial, academic, and co-curricular resurgence of the university, died peacefully on Friday, May 15, 2015 in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. 
Funeral Information
A Vigil Service will be held Monday, May 25 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church on the campus of the University of San Francisco at 650 Parker Avenue, San Francisco, 94118. 

A Requiem Mass (funeral) will be held at St. Ignatius on Tuesday, May 26 at 11 a.m., with a reception following. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/john-lo-schiavo/
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Associated Press: Former University of San Francisco President Dies at 90

Associated Press: Former University of San Francisco President Dies at 90 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Rev. John Lo Schiavo, former president of the University of San Francisco who presided over the university's resurgence and a shutdown of its basketball program, died Friday. He was 90.
 

Lo Schiavo died in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos, said University of San Francisco spokeswoman Anne-Marie Devine Tasto.
 

A San Francisco native, Lo Schiavo was born in 1925 to Italian immigrants. He graduated from Star of the Sea Grammar School and St. Ignatius High School and joined the Society of Jesus in 1942.
 

His 65-year association with USF began in 1950, when he became an instructor of philosophy. He began a 14-year presidency in 1977.
 

One of his main achievements at USF was getting the university out of debt and significantly growing its endowment from $4.6 million in 1976 to $38.7 million in 1991. [via @AP]

University of San Francisco's insight:
Fr. Lo Schiavo, who presided over a financial, academic, and co-curricular resurgence of the university, died peacefully on Friday, May 15, 2015 in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. 
Funeral Information
A Vigil Service will be held Monday, May 25 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church on the campus of the University of San Francisco at 650 Parker Avenue, San Francisco, 94118. 

A Requiem Mass (funeral) will be held at St. Ignatius on Tuesday, May 26 at 11 a.m., with a reception following. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/john-lo-schiavo/
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Contra Costa Times: In Senate battle, Republicans could play kingmaker

Contra Costa Times: In Senate battle, Republicans could play kingmaker | USF in the News | Scoop.it

WALNUT CREEK -- Steve Glazer's left-leaning detractors say he isn't a real Democrat. If enough Republican voters agree, they might just catapult the Orinda mayor into the state Senate next week.
 

In the era of single-party runoff elections, no Democrat has tried harder to court Republican voters than Glazer, a self-described social liberal and fiscal conservative who is running against Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla, a strongly pro-union Democrat from Concord.
 

Over the past three years, Glazer, a political strategist who ran Jerry Brown's 2010 gubernatorial campaign, has helped the Chamber of Commerce unseat pro-labor Democratic legislators, called for banning BART strikes and backed Assemblywoman Catharine Baker, R-Dublin, in her runoff election against a Democratic opponent. [via @CCTimes]

...

"The Republican bloc has held fairly strong, and that can only be favorable for Glazer," said Corey Cook, associate professor of politics and director of the Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good at the University of San Francisco.
 

Typically, half of so-called "orphan voters" leave their ballot blank when no member of their party is represented, Cook said. And when they do vote, they often fail to distinguish which candidate from an opposing party better reflects their political views.
 

That likely won't be the case in next week's Senate race, Cook said, because of the attention it's getting, the lack of any other contests to distract voters and Glazer's extra incentive to appeal to Republicans.
 

Cook said voters from both parties could wind up split to a certain extent.
 

"Glazer will have a measurable advantage among Republicans," she said. "The question is whether it's enough to tip the election."

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KPIX-TV CBS 5: USF Sport Management Professor Michael Goldman comments on Tom Brady Suspension

Michael Goldman is an Assistant Professor in the Sport Management Program at the University of San Francisco. He teaches Sport Marketing and Business Develop...
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