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Minnesota Public Radio: Conflict between privacy rights and security is nothing new

Minnesota Public Radio: Conflict between privacy rights and security is nothing new | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The recent revelations over NSA phone record surveillance has brought the issue of government spying, privacy and transparency back into the spotlight - but not for the first time. U.S. history shows repeated collisions between government's desire for information and a citizen's right to privacy, and between the government's freedom to act and the public's demand for transparency.


We take a historical look at transparency and privacy in American government, from the Nixon days of wiretapping to Obama's gathering of cell phone data. We examine how U.S. law has changed over time to accommodate shifting technologies, and we look at shifting perceptions of government surveillance. [via @MPR and @MPRnews]           

University of San Francisco's insight:

USF Law Professor Susan Freiwald was a guest on this program. Professor Freiwald publishes and presents widely in the areas of cyberlaw and information privacy. A former software developer, Freiwald has authored and co-authored amicus briefs in major cases involving electronic surveillance laws.

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Tony Hardman's curator insight, June 19, 2013 5:11 PM

Healthcare Interrupted -
Top Five Vulnerabilities Hackers Can Use Right Now To Shut Down Medical Devices http://bit.ly/12TDPR5

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Simone Biles' marketability window could be small

Simone Biles' marketability window could be small | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Experts estimate the pre-Olympics deals were worth between $2 million and $4 million, with the potential for $3 million or more in earnings in the coming year. That total could increase if Biles competes at the Tokyo Olympics.

 

Though a new U.S. gymnastics star or two seems to emerge every four years, Daniel Rascher, a University of San Francisco sport management professor, thinks Biles might be an exception. Finding a way to maintain her level of exposure in non-Olympic years is key.

 

"Simone is a superstar and has the ability to cut across a larger swath of the public's consciousness," he said.

 

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John Lewis retells civil rights story at USF

John Lewis retells civil rights story at USF | USF in the News | Scoop.it

John Lewis will talk about his book and his role in the civil rights movement from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at the McClaren Complex, University of San Francisco, 2130 Fulton St. Admission is free and open to the public.

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University of San Francisco Graduates First Cohort of Nurses Focused on Veterans

University of San Francisco Graduates First Cohort of Nurses Focused on Veterans | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The University of San Francisco (USF) School of Nursing and Health Professions is proud to announce the inaugural class of graduates who participated in the Veteran Affairs Nursing Academic Partnership (VANAP), a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs funded program with the Veteran Affairs Northern California Health Care System (VANCHCS) and USF’s School of Nursing and Health Professions to educate well-qualified nurses with specialized training in the health issues facing veterans. This first class of 18, graduating with a bachelor of science in nursing, will be recognized during a formal pinning ceremony this Friday, Aug. 12 at 9 a.m. in Sacramento.

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USF Provost Weighs in on College Affordability

USF Provost Weighs in on College Affordability | USF in the News | Scoop.it

What is missing in the debate about free college, however, is a discussion of the role of Pell Grants, the centerpiece of the federal government’s student aid programs. These grants, which used to cover almost the entire cost of a college education for poor students, today cover less than a third. The current Republican budget proposal would erode it even further, threatening the ability of students from poor and moderate-income families to attend and graduate from college. [via @ConversationEDU]

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Holocaust education needs to shift its focus

Holocaust education needs to shift its focus | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Focusing on the rescuer is a more fitting way to pay tribute to the millions of victims. As I go through some of the stories, I wonder if focusing on the rescuer should become a central part of Holocaust education. The perpetrators have nothing to teach us, but the rescuers speak directly to our lives and the choice we have to make.

 

Rabbi Lee Bycel of Congregation Beth Shalom in Napa is an adjunct professor in the Swig Program in Jewish Studies and Social Justice at the University of San Francisco, and a member of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, representing the museum’s work on the West Coast.

 

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USF Prof's New Research: VCs Are Feeling a Little More Optimistic

USF Prof's New Research: VCs Are Feeling a Little More Optimistic | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, a group that backs more startups than any other worldwide, had slightly higher confidence in the market during the second quarter, according to a survey by the University of San Francisco. However, outlook remains lower than a year ago as startups struggle to raise funding and delay going public.

 

The Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index found that investors are concerned about overvalued startups, unsustainable business models, a weak pipeline of initial public offerings and few acquisitions. Confidence rose to 3.6 out of 5, which is below an average of 3.71 since USF professor Mark Cannice began collecting data in 2004.

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Huffington Post: San Francisco-The Hardest City To Be Poor (Or Middle Class)

Huffington Post: San Francisco-The Hardest City To Be Poor (Or Middle Class) | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In front of the glowing new offices of Twitter on the edge of the Tenderloin, I watch the programmer step over the soiled, jean-clad legs of the homeless man lying on the sidewalk. As I descend into the underground BART station at Civic Center, I see a tired young woman who looks like a high school English teacher. Her heavy satchel is stuffed with essays as she stands in line for her 90-minute return commute to more affordable housing in Concord, 30 miles to the east. Her salary falls woefully short of what would afford her rent for a modest San Francisco apartment.

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KTVU: Panel Report on SFPD

A blue ribbon panel created to review SFPD practices found a lack of transparency and accountability in the department, according to a final report released Monday,…
University of San Francisco's insight:

Former SF Police Chief and current director of International Institute of Criminal Justice Leadership at USF, appeared on KTVU saying discipline should be tougher and come from the top of police ranks, but that there are many good officers working to protect the communities with whom they serve. 

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CNN: Training with America's 'synchro' hopefuls

CNN: Training with America's 'synchro' hopefuls | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Anita Alvarez and Mariya Koroleva walk up to the edge of the pool.

They strike a pose in their glittering costumes, hair slicked back in a tight bun. Rhythmic music begins to play, and they dive into the water.
 
For the next three minutes, Alvarez and Koroleva perform a routine that combines the gracefulness of a ballet dancer, the flexibility of an acrobat and the power of a swimmer -- all while moving together in perfect unity.

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Synchronized swimming is not a high-profile Olympic sport, and Guerrucci said its athletes don't get as many sponsorships and endorsements as others. So it often requires hard work outside the training facility, too. Koroleva, who just finished her master's degree at the University of San Francisco, is also working several hours a week at a retail sport company, Guerrucci said.

 

 

University of San Francisco's insight:

https://www.usfca.edu/magazine/summer-2016/news/sports/usf-athlete-returns-to-the-olympics

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Associated Press: In tumultuous summer, young Americans in a dour mood

Associated Press: In tumultuous summer, young Americans in a dour mood | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In a summer of political and racial tumult, young Americans are in a dour mood: pessimistic about the fairness of their economic system, questioning the greatness of the United States and deeply skeptical of the way the nation picks its leaders. A new poll of young people between the ages of 18 and 30 finds that an overwhelming 90 percent think the two-party political system has real — though fixable — problems or that it is "seriously broken."

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Overall, 54 percent said that only a few people at the top have a chance to get ahead, while the remainder said that anyone can rise economically. Those figures were consistent for all races and ethnicities.

 

Matthew Monnot, an assistant professor at the University of San Francisco School of Management, said wages haven't grown for decades and have, in fact, decreased for lower-paid professions while increasing dramatically for those at the top.

 

"It's been completely stagnant," Monnot said, "so for the people you're surveying, their entire life span has been that of the average worker not having any wage increase." [via @AP]

 

 

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J. The Jewish News Weekly of Northern California: New textbook by USF professor an introduction to ‘Judaisms’

J. The Jewish News Weekly of Northern California: New textbook by USF professor an introduction to ‘Judaisms’ | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Bay Area Jews understand that what is often called “the Jewish community” is really a community of communities, united by some things but distinctively different in so many ways.

Aaron Hahn Tapper, an associate professor in Jewish studies at the University of San Francisco, makes that understanding the central argument of his new textbook, “Judaisms.”

 

Of the subtly provocative title, he says, “It’s simple and it gets the idea across in as few words as possible.” And his idea is this: That the unity many Jews perceive in their community and in Jewish history, a story in which Judaism is recognizable in every place and at every stage of history, is just plain wrong.

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National Public Radio (NPR): Hey, [Insert Name Here], Check Out These Campaign Fundraising Emails

National Public Radio (NPR): Hey, [Insert Name Here], Check Out These Campaign Fundraising Emails | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Email campaign fundraising is tricky. How do you avoid the dreaded spam folder? Should you ask for a lot or a little? Should you sound urgent or casual?

 

There is definitely a method to the madness of sending out the right email. Candidates painstakingly test every detail of an email ahead of time to determine which is the most effective.

 

This idea isn't new — it's a move straight from President Obama's 2008 and 2012 campaigns.

 

"The Obama campaign is absolutely viewed as an innovator in this way," says Ken Goldstein, a professor of politics at the University of San Francisco. "Obama in '08 and '12, both in emails and texts, discovered it was a way to communicate in familiar and personal terms."

 

The 2012 campaign is famous for emails with strange subject lines, like the simple yet confusing "Hey" and the provocative "Are You Awake?" email, which calls to mind a different version of that question: the "U up?" popular in dorm rooms nationwide. [via @NPR]

 

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The Sacramento Bee: Sacramento devotes $10 million to high-tech firms, but plan faces risks

The Sacramento Bee: Sacramento devotes $10 million to high-tech firms, but plan faces risks | USF in the News | Scoop.it

When the City Council approved a $10 million fund for high-tech investments last month, Sacramento joined a handful of municipalities across the country hoping to buy their way into the economy of the future with public money.

 

Philadelphia, Portland, Ore., – and now Sacramento – don’t expect to turn themselves into the next Silicon Valley. But the idea is to leverage taxpayer dollars to spark innovation specific to local industries, creating a high-tech hub uniquely tied to the region.

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Mark Cannice, department chair and professor of entrepreneurship and innovation with the University of San Francisco School of Management, said that building a Sacramento-based venture capital industry would be a “key aspect” of economic change because such funders typically prefer that companies are geographically close so they can take a “hands-on approach.”

 

Having a locally based venture capital industry “really creates long-term sustainability of growth in a region,” he said.

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USF Education Professor Rick Ayers on Charter Schools

USF Education Professor Rick Ayers comments on the NAACP's recent call for a moratorium on charter schools.

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Is world’s turmoil cutting slowing flow of study abroad?

Is world’s turmoil cutting slowing flow of study abroad? | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Shirley McGuire, the senior vice provost for academic affairs at the University of San Francisco, said that USF’s study abroad office is constantly monitoring the countries where they send students. The university has not suspended programs in Europe for the fall, but McGuire said the study abroad office will be bolstering their conversations with students about safety. 

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BBC: New Study on Slow Motion Video

A new research study finds that when viewers watched a video of a violent act, they are more likely to ascribe ill intent to the person who did it if the video was played in slow motion. Eugene Caruso, associate professor of behavioral science at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, together with colleagues Zachary Burns of the University of San Francisco, and Benjamin Converse of the University of Virginia, conducted a series of experiments involving real surveillance footage from a murder to test viewers’ slow motion intentionality bias. Showing the act in slow motion video quadrupled the odds that jurors would find the act willful and premeditated. USF Professor Zachary Burns explains the findings in this BBC interview. 
 
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USF's Coach Azzi on How 1996 Olympics changed sports forever

USF's Coach Azzi on How 1996 Olympics changed sports forever | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Twenty years is about the length of a generation. A group of people born around the same time, living under a common experience.

 

By that measure, America’s current 20-year-olds have never doubted the role or value of female athletes. That is thanks in large part to the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta.

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“We knew it was a huge deal,” said University of San Francisco coach Jennifer Azzi, a player on that Olympic team. “We knew it was powerful and significant. I remember when we played at Georgetown and (Hoyas coach) John Thompson told us, ‘You’re making people respect you. You’re earning respect for the game.’”

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Politics Takes Center Stage at Bay Area Theaters

Politics Takes Center Stage at Bay Area Theaters | USF in the News | Scoop.it

It’s no coincidence that a number of plays on Bay Area stages this summer and fall are featuring the same character, one with a strong resemblance to a certain Republican presidential nominee. The most explicit is Dan Hoyle’s one man show The Real Americans, which he is performing at the Marsh in San Francisco.

 

“The very first known play was called Ye Bare and Ye Cubb, which was a political tract about why colonists should not have to pay taxes,” says Christine Young, an assistant professor and chair of the performing arts and social justice program at the University of San Francisco.

University of San Francisco's insight:

The Performing Arts & Social Justice major at the University of San Francisco trains socially conscious artists to use performance as a tool for positive change.

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USF Appoints New Vice Provost of Student Life

USF Appoints New Vice Provost of Student Life | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The University of San Francisco (USF) has named Julie Orio vice provost of student life. Orio has served as interim vice provost of student life at USF since August 2015, where she has led a team of approximately 140 full-time professionals and 25 graduate students to enliven the university's Jesuit mission through its co-curricular offices and activities that support the development and success of all students. She will begin her permanent role immediately.

 

Orio will continue to report to Donald Heller, provost and vice president of academic affairs for USF, and serve on USF PresidentPaul J. Fitzgerald's executive cabinet, providing counsel to the members regarding overall support and resources for student success.

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The San Francisco Chronicle: As Twitch streams RNC, commentary runs from thoughtful to snarky

The San Francisco Chronicle: As Twitch streams RNC, commentary runs from thoughtful to snarky | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The worlds of politics and video-game players came together Monday in an unusual experiment.

 

The San Francisco online company Twitch, which attracts more than 100 million monthly viewers, began streaming the official live video feed from the Republican National Convention, offering Twitch members who normally stream video of themselves playing games the ability to rebroadcast the video with their own colorful commentary.

 

Ken Goldstein, a University of San Francisco professor of politics, said he doesn’t believe Twitch viewers are going to be tuning in to the conventions in droves, especially because voters who have already made up their minds won’t be swayed by watching one convention over the other.

 

“Political junkies who really want to see much more inside of the convention will be interested,” Goldstein said. “The reasons why people who use Twitch didn’t watch conventions in the past weren’t because it wasn’t on Twitch. You’ll see more people using Twitch to avoid the conventions than to consume the conventions.”

 

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Keally McBride, another professor of politics at USF, said the Millennial generation might pay attention because this month’s conventions might be the most “highly entertaining” conventions in years.

 

But instead of watching the streams from the inside, she expects people might seek videos on YouTube and other sources on the action outside the convention halls, especially with “the battle lines” drawn in Cleveland.

 

“That’s where a lot of the news will actually come from,” she said. [via @SFGate]

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KTVU: Who will Trump Choose as VP?

Donnie Fowler, adjunct lecturer in the USF Politics Department, maintains that Trump needs a running mate who will bring order to his campaign and make him seem…
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Inside Higher Ed: Foundering Finances, the Faculty Role: a Survey of Business Officers

Inside Higher Ed: Foundering Finances, the Faculty Role: a Survey of Business Officers | USF in the News | Scoop.it

More campus business officers are convinced that higher education finances are in a crisis, but a new survey raises questions over whether and how they are involving faculty members as they seek a way forward.

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“There often aren’t processes that bring [faculty members] into a meaningful role in collegewide budget decisions,” said Donald Heller, provost and vice president of academic affairs at the University of San Francisco and a researcher who studies higher education finance.

 

“You can’t separate financial issues from academic issues at most institutions, but the fact of the matter is relatively few faculty members have an interest in the broader financial issues at an institution.”

 

Ultimately, the question becomes how much faculty are involved and in which issues, Heller said.

“It’s always a balancing act,” Heller said. “For example, if you’re looking at the issue of faculty compensation and the impact that has on your budget, then of course faculty are going to be much more involved.” [via @insidehighered]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Donald E. Heller is Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs and a professor of education at the University of San Francisco. He is responsible for the university’s five schools, libraries, academic affairs, student life, enrollment management, online programs, international relations, and diversity and community outreach for the university’s 10,800 students, 1,200 faculty, and 1,000 staff.

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San Jose Mercury News: Bay Area comes to grips with growing racial divide after Dallas police shootings

San Jose Mercury News: Bay Area comes to grips with growing racial divide after Dallas police shootings | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In 68 hours this week, America changed.

 

The country, simmering under the heat of a chaotic presidential race and the tension of increasingly volatile race relations, is reeling after a sniper in Dallas struck down five white police officers and police in Louisiana and Minnesota killed two black men -- all in 68 hours.

 

The Bay Area is used to tumult, but what grips the country now is shaking us all: Where do we go from here?

 

James Taylor fears the answer. "This has put us on the precipice ... of more chaos and a return to the violence we saw in the 1960s," said Taylor, who is the director of the African-American studies program at the University of San Francisco.

[via @mercnews]

 

 

University of San Francisco's insight:

USF Politics Professor & Director of the African American Studies Program, James Lance Taylor, is author of the book Black Nationalism in the United States: From Malcolm X to Barack Obama, which earned 2011 "Outstanding Academic Title" - Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries (January 2012). (Ranked top 3 percent of 25,000 books submitted and top 8 percent of 7,300 actually accepted for review by the American Library Association). He is the Immediate Past President of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS), an important organization of African American, African, and Afro Caribbean political scientists in the United States.

 

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The Washington Post: What Syracuse’s hire of an ESPN executive tells us about college sports

The Washington Post: What Syracuse’s hire of an ESPN executive tells us about college sports | USF in the News | Scoop.it

A dozen years ago, the athletic director at Syracuse was a gray-haired, cardigan-wearing, Winston-smoking man named Jake Crouthamel. The job he held immediately prior was head football coach at Dartmouth. Crouthamel’s tenure ended in 2005, which doesn’t seem that long ago. In the realm of college sports, it might as well be eons. That was when sports people ran athletic departments, because the most prominent feature of college sports was sports.

 

Since Crouthamel’s retirement in 2005, Syracuse employed two athletic directors, both of whom had climbed sports administration rungs. The man they chose to succeed them aptly reflects the state of college sports: Until Wednesday afternoon, John Wildhack was ESPN’s Executive Vice President for Production and Programming.

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Professor Dan Rascher, the director of the sport management program at the University of San Francisco, described the trend as temporary in a unique way. The professionalization of college sports is moving faster than the rate at which traditional administrators can be trained in the new expertise required to run the small corporations athletic departments have become. But in time, perhaps the span of a few years, traditional administrators will be people like Wildhack, or at least they will have been trained up through the ranks to develop his business-forward skill-set.

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San Jose Mercury News: Uber battling more than 70 lawsuits in federal courts

San Jose Mercury News: Uber battling more than 70 lawsuits in federal courts | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The past few months have been good to Uber -- the world's most valuable startup raised a record-breaking $3.5 billion in June and in April escaped a high-profile trial that threatened to upend its entire business model.

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The ride-booking platform announced public settlements in at least six cases during the past year, agreeing to shell out up to $163 million. Those deals seem to represent a shift for the company, which originally made a show of fighting litigation tooth and nail, said Joshua Davis, associate dean for academic affairs at the University of San Francisco School of Law.

 

"One possibility is that you're seeing a kind of maturing of the company in a way," he said. "That it is going from sort of a cowboy mentality, if you will, to more of the attitude of an established company."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Professor Joshua Paul Davis is the associate dean for academic affairs; in this role he oversees the law school's academic programs and is responsible for curricular and program developments and implementation. Davis focuses his scholarly research on complex litigation, ethics, and the interplay between the two. As director of the Center for Law and Ethics, he leads panels, organizes symposia, and undertakes research exploring these topics.

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