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San Francisco Chronicle: San Franciscans ambivalent on future, poll finds

San Francisco Chronicle: San Franciscans ambivalent on future, poll finds | USF in the News | Scoop.it

San Franciscans are pleased with the city's thriving economy, give fairly high marks to the mayor and Board of Supervisors, and believe the city as a whole is headed in the right direction.


Yet the majority say that the city has gotten much more expensive recently and that the tech-fueled economic boom isn't benefiting them or their families. They also say that the government should do more to make sure all types of people can live in San Francisco - but the majority don't trust the mayor or supervisors to accomplish that.


Those are the conflicting findings of a new poll by University of San Francisco researchers provided exclusively to The Chronicle. It shows the tug average city residents feel between happiness that the recession appears to be firmly behind us and concerns that the city is quickly becoming out of reach to wide swaths of people.


"There's anxiety out there," said Corey Cook, a political science professor at USF who conducted the poll with David Latterman, a USF lecturer and political consultant.


"There's a lot of conflict in people's minds," Cook continued. "We're glad the economy is strong, and the city's going in the right direction. At the same time, I'm not sure what this means for me, my family, my neighbors and my neighborhood." [via @sfgate]

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San Francisco Chronicle: Bowen's depression revelation shifts secretary of state race

San Francisco Chronicle: Bowen's depression revelation shifts secretary of state race | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Complaints about slow election results, inadequate campaign finance reporting and archaic business-registration processes have dominated the campaign for California secretary of state, but until last weekend, those debates attracted the usual level of attention for a down-ballot race - not much.


That changed with termed-out Secretary of State Debra Bowen's revelation of her debilitating fight with depression, which shoved the office's problems into the public eye and altered the landscape for both the candidates looking to succeed her.


Democratic state Sen. Alex Padilla of Pacoima (Los Angeles County) and Republican civic engagement activist Pete Peterson are both walking a fine line approaching the Nov. 4 election - not wanting to appear to be coming down hard on a troubled incumbent, while offering their own agendas for reform and needed changes in the office. [via @sfchronicle]

...

Corey Cook, politics professor and director of the Leo McCarthy Center for Public Service at the University of San Francisco, said Bowen's problems may be the only thing many voters hear about the secretary of state's race. Although it's one of just 10 statewide elected positions, the job is "very, very low on people's radar," he said. 

University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on Race, Presidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research.


He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation.

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San Francisco Chronicle: New Common Core math standards add up to big changes

San Francisco Chronicle: New Common Core math standards add up to big changes | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Some say the new Common Core math standards are too easy. Others say they're too hard or too focused on ideas rather than correct answers.

Whatever they are, they're in full effect in California public school classrooms this year.


The new standards remain the subject of a national debate as politicians bicker over whether national standards are a federal takeover of state school systems. [via @sfchronicle]

...

"The Common Core standards are meant to show people what students should know and be able to do," said Peter Williamson, associate professor of teacher education at theUniversity of San Francisco. "I think that we've come from an era of scripted curriculum materials ... of teachers being told how to teach and what to teach. The Common Core is asking us to step away from that and to teach without those scripts."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Williamson is an assistant professor of teacher education in the graduate School of Education at the University of San Francisco. Formerly the Director of Stanford's Teachers for a New Era project and an instructor in the Stanford Teacher Education Program, Peter completed his Ph.D. at Stanford in Curriculum and Teacher Education. Before coming to Stanford, Peter taught middle and high school English and journalism in San Francisco Bay Area schools, and worked with advocacy agencies focusing on urban youth. His research interests include the teaching and learning of practice, teacher professional development, teacher effectiveness, urban education, and language acquisition.

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USF and Prebacked Host MedHack Sept. 6-7

USF and Prebacked Host MedHack Sept. 6-7 | USF in the News | Scoop.it
University of San Francisco's insight:

A Hackathon focused on healthcare technology

The University of San Francisco (USF) is teaming up with Prebacked, a company making social good entrepreneurship as accessible and profitable as social network entrepreneurship, to host MedHack, a weekend-long hackathon for talented developers and medical experts to spark new innovations in health care technology. The event will take place in the McLaren Conference Center on the USF campus (2130 Fulton Street in San Francisco), September 6-7.


The hackathon involves participants teaming up with like-minded individuals and developing new healthcare technology for web, mobile, or hardware. Each team will compete against each other, and a panel of entrepreneurs, healthcare, and technology professionals will judge the innovative products.


“USF and Prebacked share a belief that the best minds of our generation can use their intelligence and ingenuity to transform, improve, and build better the world,” said Prebacked Founder and CEO Garrett Dunham. “We are proud that USF is our host and partner for MedHack and we can’t wait to see what participants develop.”

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China Daily USA: Firms hear success tips in the US

China Daily USA: Firms hear success tips in the US | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Human capital is the key to success for Chinese companies doing business in the US, a panel discussion suggested.

China's General Chamber of Commerce-USA and the China Business Studies Initiative of the University of San Francisco held a panel discussion on the release of a new survey report Chinese Enterprises in US at the University of San Francisco on Aug 29.


Representatives of local Chinese enterprises, business schools, law firms and overseas organizations joined in the discussion. The survey was conducted by Yang Xiaohua, associate professor at the University of San Francisco, and Richard Huang, executive director of China General Chamber of Commerce-USA.


Other panelists included Ben Chen, a representative of China Unicom; Jeff Leader, a governmental affairs consultant; and Marshall Meyer, a professor from Wharton School of Business.

"This event is aimed at bringing policy makers, business insiders, business organizations and our students together to assist Chinese companies in going global," said Yang.

...

[via @ChinaDailyUSA]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Associate Professor Xiaohua Yang is garnering recognition in both the international academic community and media (Wenzhou Daily, Sing Tao Daily, and Lihong Radio) for her research on Chinese enterprises in the U.S. and the globalization of Chinese business. She explores, among other key specialties, the relationship between brand recognition and firm performance, internationalization of Chinese firms, R&D strategic alliances, and foreign market entry strategies.

Dr. Yang is frequently invited to speak at international business conferences, forums and symposia - including HYSTA annual conference, Berkeley China Forum, Wenzhou Pareto Public Policy Colloquium, and Harvard Conference: China Goes Global. She brings her extensive academic and professional experience in Australia, Finland, Armenia, China, Taiwan, and the U.S. to her students and truly exemplifies the Jesuit hallmark of a global perspective.

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The New York Times: Start-Ups Accrue Funding in Case of Leaner Times

The New York Times: Start-Ups Accrue Funding in Case of Leaner Times | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In 1999, right before the dot-com bubble popped, Lawrence Coburn quit his corporate job and dove into the Internet gold rush, raising $600,000 from friends and family — including his grandmother — for a consumer ratings site he founded called RateItAll. At the time, virtually any idea, no matter how far-fetched, seemed to hold the promise of a high-flying initial public offering, making it easy to attract financial backing.

But when technology stocks collapsed and venture capital dried up, RateItAll ran out of cash by 2001.

...

Still, the investor enthusiasm is now mixed with a modicum of concern. A survey of venture capitalists in the second quarter by Mark V. Cannice, an entrepreneurship professor at the University of San Francisco School of Management, produced a reading of 4.02 on a five-point scale of confidence. While high, that level was virtually flat from the first quarter of the year, ending a seven-quarter streak of increases.

[via @williamalden @dealbook @nytimes]
University of San Francisco's insight:

Mark V. Cannice, Ph.D. (photo above) is an internationally recognized scholar, teacher, and speaker on entrepreneurship and venture capital. He is Department Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation with the University of San Francisco School of Management.

Dr. Cannice writes the widely-followed quarterly Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index Report® which is published by ProQuest and EBSCO, carried globally on Bloomberg Professional Services in 125 countries (Bloomberg ticker symbol: SVVCCI), and has been referenced in the Economist, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Xinhua News Service, Der Speigel, CNBC, National Public Radio, and many other media. He has written similar quarterly reports on the Chinese venture capital industry, China Venture Capitalist Confidence Index Report™ (Bloomberg ticker symbol: CVCCI).

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Marketplace: Anti-Bloomberg ad signals new political trend

Marketplace: Anti-Bloomberg ad signals new political trend | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Experts expect between $6 and 7 billion will be spent on messaging during the 2016 campaign season and its run-up. The Supreme Court’s “Citizens United” decision opened the door to more outside spending on advertising, and that has changed a lot of things – including who gets attacked by attack ads.  


Last week, the National Rifle Association kicked off a multi-million dollar ad campaign with a 30-second spot.


According to Ken Goldstein, a political science professor at the University of San Francisco, Michael Bloomberg and other big donors are being cast as outsiders.  “The message here is that there is something improper about these people being involved in politics,” he says. “That their money is trying to fool you.”


This is an update, Goldstein says, of a technique campaign operatives have used for a long time.


“One of the first things one does in opposition research is see if they can tie the other side to someone who is unsavory or unpopular."


What the NRA is hoping, Goldstein says, is that this ad – and others it plans to run nationwide – will affect how Americans see Michael Bloomberg and the cause he backs.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Ken Goldstein is a professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco and Faculty Director of the USF in DC program. He also teaches in USF's Masters' Program in Public Affairs, which focuses on the skills needed to run a modern political campaign.

Before joining the University of San Francisco, Goldstein was a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he won the University of Wisconsin's Kellet Award for his career research accomplishments and the Chancellor's Award for excellence in teaching. Goldstein is one of the country's premier experts on the use and impact of political advertising.

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National Geographic: Ask Your Weird Animal Questions - Alligators and Regenerators

National Geographic: Ask Your Weird Animal Questions - Alligators and Regenerators | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Regenerating animals are always fun to learn about, so I took cat’s curiosity to James Sikes of the University of San Francisco and asked him about one that was new to me, Hydractinia echinata. These jellyfish relatives are also fetchingly known as “snail fur” due to the furry look the tiny marine polyps create when they colonize the back of a snail or hermit crab shell.


The species, described here on the Marine Life Information Network, is being used for research byUri Frank of the National University of Ireland, Galway, who has said that they are “perfect for understanding the role of stem cells in development, aging, and disease.” (Related: Spiderman Ready: 5 Animals That Regrow Body Parts


“They are constantly re-forming their body, sloughing off dead cells and replacing them with brand-new cells. They’re rebuilding their body 24/7 so that they really don’t age,” Sikes says.


They can also regenerate any lost body part and clone themselves.

“They’re pretty good at the game,” says Sikes, who led a study in which changing the activity of a single gene in a flatworm that had lost its regenerative ability enabled the worm to regrow its head.


Sikes says the “powerhouse” regenerators are flatworms, ribbon worms, salamanders, newts, and tadpoles, which can regrow a lost tail—except during a short window of time, a few hours, during which that ability is turned off. [via @natgeo]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Professor Sikes is interested in the evolution and development of regeneration and asexual reproduction in invertebrates, particularly marine and freshwater flatworms. Current research focuses on understanding developmental mechanisms that allow some flatworms to regenerate and the molecular developmental processes that lead to diversification of asexual reproductive strategies.

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National Catholic Reporter: Sex, drugs and ... Catholic Colleges

National Catholic Reporter: Sex, drugs and ... Catholic Colleges | USF in the News | Scoop.it

You’ve probably heard the stereotype: Catholic colleges are in denial about their students’ sexual lives and alcohol use. Indeed, it’s true that many Catholic universities traditionally ended the conversations on sex and underage drinking with a simple, “just say no!” And yet, students attending Catholic colleges do not differ from students at other colleges, with sex and drinking nationally starting before college. Recent surveys suggest the average age Americans start having sex is 17, and the average age of first use of alcohol is 14. With 95 percent of Americans having sex before marriage, it’s safe to say there’s a bit of a gap between the official university policies and actual student behavior.

Moving beyond the stereotype, I suspect the traditional Catholic abstinence-only model isn’t as black and white as some people may have painted it. I spoke the other day with a recently graduated R.A. from a Catholic college who told me the way he was trained to handle sexual issues on campus.


...

This week’s video, however, proves this stereotype is becoming less and less accurate. The University of San Francisco, a Jesuit Catholic college, is leading the conversation about sexual violence and substance abuse through “Think About It”, a digitally interactive awareness program that’s both pastoral and conscious of the reality of students’ lived experiences. Nearly 70 national universities, including many non-Catholic, have already adopted it. What struck me, however, is its distinctive Ignatian approach.



“Think About It” addresses four main topics: sexuality, drugs and alcohol, sexual violence, and healthy relationships. It makes it clear that sex, drugs and alcohol shouldn’t be trivialized. As the title suggests, the program urges thoughtful reflection about decisions students encounter, looking at these subjects from a cura personalis (care of the whole person) perspective. The required program takes into account students’ lived experiences (it doesn’t alienate students who haven’t taken abstinence pledges, but instead is designed to be helpful for all students), and distinguishes between sex, intimacy, and love, and how this might all fit into our deepest desires.


President Barack Obama’s Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act requires all universities to provide prevention and awareness programs, but “Think About It” attempts to exceed this requirement by doing more than just passing on information. It focuses on sexuality as a sacred gift, alcohol and drugs as substances with very real consequences, and I found there to be an overarching reminder of innate human dignity throughout. That emphasis on transcendent dignity will hopefully lessen the experiences of shame on many campuses and encourage openness. With unreported sexual assault currently at 80 percent, it’s clear we have some major work to do. [via @NCRonline]

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San Francisco Chronicle: Police often provoke protest violence, UC researchers find

San Francisco Chronicle: Police often provoke protest violence, UC researchers find | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The violence that turns a small-town protest into a fiery national spectacle like the one that has played out this month in Missouri is often unwittingly provoked by police, according to researchers at UC Berkeley.


The research team, which studied clashes between police and activists during the Occupy movement three years ago, found that protests tend to turn violent when officers use aggressive tactics, such as approaching demonstrators in riot gear or lining up in military-like formations.


Recent events in Ferguson, Mo., are a good example, the study's lead researcher said. For nearly two weeks, activists angered by a white police officer's fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager have ratcheted up their protests when confronted by heavily armed police forces. [via @sfchronicle]

...

Tony Ribera, San Francisco police chief from 1992 to 1996, said there's little doubt that officers' actions can determine how protesters react. However, he said, large demonstrations draw agitators who are there solely to cause trouble, regardless of what police do.


He said law enforcement agencies are usually most successful at handling demonstrations when they approach with a non-confrontational stance and ramp up when necessary.


"It's hard to have a confrontational situation, then pull back from that," said Ribera, who now heads the International Institute of Criminal Justice Leadership at the University of San Francisco.


Large police departments know this, Ribera said, and train their officers accordingly.

University of San Francisco's insight:
Assistant Professor Anthony Ribera brings a wealth of experience at the center of San Francisco civic life to both his teaching and academic work. As former Police Chief of San Francisco, Professor Ribera believes effective leaders are ethical leaders, underscoring the core values of the Jesuit tradition, promoting conscientious action for social justice. Dr. Ribera currently teaches the Law Enforcement Leadership program and has since 1997 when he wrote the original curriculum. In 2001, USF formed the International Institute of Criminal Justice Leadership and appointed Professor Ribera as its director. The Institute's annual symposium has emerged as a groundbreaking forum for progressive law enforcement training and leadership.

While Dr. Ribera feels that leadership and motivation are driven from within, the goal of his curriculum is to help awaken these attributes in students, helping them examine real world scenarios with the aim of developing real world management skills. Drawing from his own work in proactive police administration - an effort to achieve symbiotic partnership and mutual trust between police officers and the neighborhoods they serve - Professor Ribera is showing students how to improve transparency, lead with integrity and form alliances within the community.
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San Francisco Chronicle: Mayor Ed Lee not Mr. Nice Guy around City Hall anymore

San Francisco Chronicle: Mayor Ed Lee not Mr. Nice Guy around City Hall anymore | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Mayor Ed Lee has staked out a reputation as San Francisco's feel-good mayor, the genuinely nice guy who tempered the city's notoriously fractious liberal politics.


That reputation is waning.


The mayor's recent dispute with some traditional allies on the Board of Supervisors over how to increase Muni funding is the most public fight in a series of spats that have undercut Lee's cultivated image as a genial consensus builder who, in his words, is "not a politician."


It has exposed an administration intently focused on Lee's re-election in 2015, even as some insiders say the mayor - a longtime bureaucrat who is now 62 years old - has grown increasingly disengaged from some aspects of governance, frustrating some supervisors and senior staff. [via @sfchronicle]

...

"These fights are over how this critically important ballot will be contested, and what it will mean as an assessment of the mayor and the job he's doing heading into his re-election year," said Corey Cook, director of the Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service at the University of San Francisco. "The era of good feelings at City Hall is starting to break down."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on RacePresidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research.


He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation. 

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Chicago Tribune: Reviews - 'Getting Schooled' by Garret Keizer and 'Blackboard' by Lewis Buzbee

Chicago Tribune: Reviews - 'Getting Schooled' by Garret Keizer and 'Blackboard' by Lewis Buzbee | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Lewis Buzbee's "Blackboard: A Personal History of the Classroom" is the memoir of a student who was, on the whole, fed well by his culture and his schools. "I went to school in Paradise," he writes. "I was blessed, from kindergarten through grad school, with teachers who were kind to me at the very least, and inspired and inspiring at their very best." Indeed, as Buzbee's tale relates, it was his teachers, and the passion for writing they inspired in him — he went on to become a professional writer and now teaches in the master's of fine arts program at the University of San Francisco — that saved him from despair when, after the death of his father from an unexpected heart attack, he fell into drug use, shoplifting and general dissolution.


Like Buzbee's previous book, "The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop," "Blackboard" is a gentle, pleasant and charming read. But there is a fierce anger and frustration lying just beneath the surface — as there also is in "Getting Schooled" — directed at the neglect and, occasionally, contempt politicians and taxpayers have displayed toward public education in recent years.


"It is a source of great dismay and anger to me that art and crafts and music too, along with the more applied sciences, are no longer offered in such abundance, if at all, in today's California public schools. … What I once took for granted is now something viewed as extra, superfluous." [via @chicagotribune]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Author of novels Fliegelman's Desire (1990), Steinbeck's Ghost (2008) which was a Smithsonian Notable Book, the Northern California Independent Booksellers Association Children's Book of the Year, and the winner of the Beatty Award from the California Library Association, The Haunting of Charles Dickens (2010), winner of the Northern California Book Award, an Edgar Award nominee, and a Judy Lopez memorial Honor book, and Bridge of Time (2012); stories, After the Gold Rush (2006); and nonfiction, The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop (2006) andBlackboard: A Personal History of the Classroom (2014). Published in Harper's, Paris ReviewGentleman's QuarterlyThe New York Times Book ReviewBlack Warrior ReviewZYZZYVA, and Best American Poetry 1995.

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San Francisco Business Times: Fr. Paul Fitzgerald — USF's 21st century answer to Boys Town's Fr. Flanagan?

San Francisco Business Times: Fr. Paul Fitzgerald — USF's 21st century answer to Boys Town's Fr. Flanagan? | USF in the News | Scoop.it

New University of San Francisco President Father Paul Fitzgerald is no Spencer Tracy— and that's OK.


Fitzgerald this month becomes the 28th president in the Jesuit Catholic university's 159 years. But for some of us, a priest always is defined as "Father Flanagan" of Boys Town fame, played in the 1938 Hollywood version of the story by Spencer Tracy.


So in interviewing Fitzgerald for our weekly Executive Profile, I had to ask: How many times have you watched "Boys Town"? [via @sfbusinesstimes]

...

"I used to use it in class, so I've seen it a few times," Fitzgerald said.


The movie is "almost shocking" today, Fitzgerald said, because of its portrayal of the rough-and-tumble priest with a heart of gold. "That image of the priest doesn't work so much anymore, especially after the scandals (the Catholic Church has) been through."


Fitzgerald, who reads Belgian detective novels in French to relax (!), wants to return to the classroom next year, after he gets to meet many of the 10,000 students and 2,400 faculty and staff. With a doctorate in the society of religion from the University of Paris-La Sorbonne and a pontifical doctorate in ecclesiology from the Institut Catholique de Paris, Fitzgerald likes to teach about "practical theology." or "the overlaps of what (people) believe and how they act that out in the world."


Fitzgerald will be officially inaugurated as USF president in a Nov. 1 ceremony.

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San Francisco’s Poet Laureate and Glide Foundation Co-Founder to Teach at USF

San Francisco’s Poet Laureate and Glide Foundation Co-Founder to Teach at USF | USF in the News | Scoop.it
University of San Francisco's insight:

The notable Janice Mirikitani, San Francisco’s second poet laureate and co-founding president of the groundbreaking Glide Foundation, has been named Diversity Scholar Visiting Professor at the University of San Francisco (USF). Mirikitani will be teaching an undergraduate course, Poetry and Poverty: Transformation From Dust, starting this fall.


“My vision is that students will grow to know themselves better, gain an enriched view and consideration of people who are not the same as they are, and experience a change within themselves as the semester progresses,” Mirikitani said.  


Blending Mirikitani and USF’s shared passion for justice, Poetry and Poverty: Transformation from Dust, will explore the issues of poverty and oppression through the use of poetry, personal narrative, and direct community engagement with San Francisco’s Tenderloin neighborhood. The goals of the course are to hone students’ writing skills while deepening empathy and understanding as they interact with San Francisco’s most marginalized.

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Catholic San Francisco: Anger, tears, hope shared at USF prayer service for Michael Brown

Catholic San Francisco: Anger, tears, hope shared at USF prayer service for Michael Brown | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Almost a month after the Aug. 9 death of Michael Brown, an unarmed teenager shot by a white patrolman in Ferguson, Missouri, University of San Francisco students, faculty and staff gathered at the school’s Privett Plaza on Sept. 3 to pray together for what incoming USF president and Jesuit Father Paul Fitzgerald called the “radical equality” of every human person.


“Michael Brown’s death is a death in the family,” he said. “It evokes suffering in us as it does in his more immediate family. We can only ask God to help us make the suffering meaningful instead of meaningless.”


Moments after the St. Ignatius Church bell rang in the noon hour, the subdued crowd bowed their heads to listen to a prayer written and read by alumnus Michael Tadesse-Bell, director of student persistence and mentorship programs and a former USF basketball player. 


Mary Wardell Ghirarduzzi, vice provost of USF’s Office of Diversity Engagement and Community Outreach, told Catholic San Francisco that the campus prayer service for Michael Brown was organized by her department, university ministry and Father Fitzgerald. [via @catholic_sf]

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San Jose Mercury News: Debate sets stage for big push in campaigns for governor

San Jose Mercury News: Debate sets stage for big push in campaigns for governor | USF in the News | Scoop.it

To hear them tell it, Gov. Jerry Brown and Republican challenger Neel Kashkari each has the other right where he wants him.


After Thursday night's often-pugnacious debate, each says he's well situated for the final 8½ weeks before Election Day. Then again, what else would a candidate say?


Kashkari, given the biggest bully pulpit he's likely to have this year, came out swinging and landed a few blows on a man who first was sworn in as governor when Kashkari was still in diapers. Brown seemed feisty and eager to sling back Kashkari's barbs. [via @mercnews]

Kashkari had a good night and showed a strong command of issues, agreed Corey Cook, who directs the University of San Francisco's Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good.
 

Still, there's "almost nothing" he can do to propel himself ahead of Brown or dramatically reshape the election, Cook said.
 

"There's no line of attack for him to follow given what voters think of the governor," he said, adding Kashkari's biggest impact might come after Election Day.
 

"The question now is can he make a compelling case to Republicans about where the party needs to go."


University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on RacePresidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research.


He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation. 

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USF Education Dean Talks Education & The Arts, Sept. 10

USF Education Dean Talks Education & The Arts, Sept. 10 | USF in the News | Scoop.it
University of San Francisco's insight:

A conversation with Kevin Kumashiro

In recognition of National Arts in Education Week, the University of San Francisco (USF) School of Education is proud to host, “Education, Social Justice, and the Arts: Seeing the Connections,” a lecture event featuring Dean Kevin Kumashiro. The special presentation will be in McLaren 252 on Wednesday, September 10 at 6:30 p.m.
 

Sharing lessons from his own teaching, Dean Kumashiro will examine the role that the arts can play in advancing educational quality and social justice. His lecture will give insight on reframing the debate on educational reform, and how the arts can be integrated in the curriculum to invite radically different ways in envisioning learning, teaching, and schools for historically underserved communities.


The former teacher and education activist was appointed as dean of the School of Education in 2013. During his time at USF, Kumashiro has continued to lead the school in its commitment to community by educating involved teachers, devoted leaders, and caring counselors.

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Huffington Post: 16 Reasons Why Opening Our Borders Makes More Sense Than Militarizing Them

Huffington Post: 16 Reasons Why Opening Our Borders Makes More Sense Than Militarizing Them | USF in the News | Scoop.it

What would happen if the United States suddenly stopped building walls and instead flung open its borders, not unlike the European Union has done among the member countries of the common market?


Conservatives malign the notion and liberals, even radical ones, haven't exactly embraced the "open borders" concept. But the idea isn't as radical as it may seem. For most of its history, the United States has had, for all practical purposes, open borders, according to University of San Francisco law professor Bill Hing.


"Really, the United States was an open-border situation, worldwide, up through the early 1900s -- except for Asians," Hing told The Huffington Post. "There were Asian-exclusion laws. But if you put that aside, it was open borders for the rest of the world." [via @huffingtonpost]

...

As Bill Hing points out, when the European Union was created, effectively allowing the free movement of EU citizens across the common market's borders, a funny thing happened. Countries once known for their high output of immigrants, like Spain, Portugal and Ireland, became immigrant-receiving countries -- a pattern that held until the worldwide economic crisis in 2007.


"Why?" says Hing. "Because there was huge investment in their economies. If we approach immigration the way they did in the EU [...] you actually will not see a hysterical flood of migrants across the border. But I do think it needs to be coupled with serious investment in poor areas of Mexico."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Throughout his career, Professor Bill Ong Hing pursued social justice through a combination of community work, litigation, and scholarship. He is the author of numerous academic and practice-oriented publications on immigration policy and race relations, including Ethical Borders—NAFTA, Globalization, and Mexican Migration(Temple University Press, 2010), Deporting Our Souls-Morality, Values, and Immigration Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2006), Defining America Through Immigration Policy (Temple University Press, 2004), and Making and Remaking Asian America Through Immigration Policy (Stanford University Press, 1993). His book To Be An American: Cultural Pluralism and the Rhetoric of Assimilation (NYU Press, 1997) received the award for Outstanding Academic Book by the librarians' journal Choice. At UC Davis, Hing directed the law school clinical program. He was also co-counsel in the precedent-setting U.S. Supreme Court asylum case, INS v. Cardoza-Fonseca (1987). Hing is the founder of the Immigrant Legal Resource Center in San Francisco and continues to volunteer as general counsel for this organization. He serves on the National Advisory Council of the Asian American Justice Center in Washington, D.C.

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NPR: Immigrants Keep Children Bilingual By Schooling Them At Home

NPR: Immigrants Keep Children Bilingual By Schooling Them At Home | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Many Spanish-speaking immigrants want their children to stay fluent in Spanish even as they learn English. Bilingual home schooling does that on a more personal level. [via @nprnews]

...

WASTVEDT: More immigrant families these days see staying in touch with their home cultures as an asset, rather than the liability it might've been in the past.


URSULA ALDANA: I live in a different time than when I know that historically, other immigrants felt like they needed to sort of assimilate.


WASTVEDT: Ursula Aldana teaches education at the University of San Francisco.
 

ALDANA: The reality is, I don't think that that's - that's just not the time that we live in. We live in such an era of globalization that it seems ridiculous to ask for that.
 

WASTVEDT: The school system has reflected that trend. The number of public and private duel language immersion programs has skyrocketed in the past decade from the low hundreds to around 2,000. You might think kids learning two languages would take longer to pick up specific skills, like reading or writing, in each. Aldana says that's not the case. The two languages work together to build literacy.
 

ALDANA: Literacy is really just understanding how language works and students being able to understand that writing and reading are sort of very interrelated - that happens in any language.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Ursula's research focuses on K-12 teaching and leadership with regard to issues of equity and access for racially/ethnically and linguistically diverse students. Her teaching experience in public urban schools juxtaposed with her personal experience in Catholic schools (from elementary to graduate) has motivated her to research the intersection of the Latina/o experience in Catholic education. Prior to her move to USF, she served as the lead research associate on multiple research projects that examined academic programs, innovations, leadership and school culture of Catholic schools at the Center for Catholic Education at Loyola Marymount University (LMU). In addition to her work at LMU, she has worked for the Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles at UCLA on a variety of research projects related to bilingual education. Ursula’s publications have appeared in the Journal of Catholic Education and Anthropology and Education Quarterly. She received her Ph.D. in Education with a concentration in Urban Schooling from UCLA’s Graduate School of Education and Information Studies in 2012. 

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Giant Panda Event at USF Sept. 10

Giant Panda Event at USF Sept. 10 | USF in the News | Scoop.it
University of San Francisco's insight:

 A public lecture featuring World Wildlife Fund’s Colby Loucks

The University of San Francisco’s Center for Asia Pacific Studies presents, “China’s Reigning Ambassador: The Giant Panda,” a lecture and question and answer session with World Wildlife Fund’s (WWF) Colby Loucks. Co-sponsored by the Environmental Studies department, the lecture aims to raise awareness about environmental issues in Asia. The 45-minute lecture and 30-minute Q&A will take place in Fromm Hall on the USF campus, Wednesday, September 10 at 5 p.m. This event is free and open to the public.


“The panda, beloved around the world, is a symbol of global conservation,” said Melissa Dale, executive director of the Center for Asia Pacific Studies at USF. “We are thrilled to have the World Wildlife Fund’s Colby Loucks on campus to provide us with an update on the latest efforts to save this important symbol of Chinese-Western interaction.”


Loucks comes to USF with insight on how China’s dedication to save the giant panda has elevated its influence in conservation both domestically and overseas. Through these conservation efforts, he presents the cross-cultural connections that have been created between the non-profit and business worlds, and how an emerging class of new wealth in China has brought a new battle—combatting luxury wildlife products.

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KCBS In Depth: Examining Racial Progress In The U.S.

KCBS In Depth: Examining Racial Progress In The U.S. | USF in the News | Scoop.it

KCBS In Depth host Jan McMillan speaks with Professor James Taylor, Chair of the Department of Politics at the University of San Francisco, about the race relations in the U.S. and how it plays in with recent events, including the fatal shooting of an unarmed teen in Ferguson, Mo at the hands of the police.

University of San Francisco's insight:

James Lance Taylor is author of the book Black Nationalism in the United States: From Malcolm X to Barack Obama, which earned 2011 "Outstanding Academic Title" -Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries (January 2012). (Ranked top 3 percent of 25,000 books submitted and top 8 percent of 7,300 actually accepted for review by the American Library Association). He is the Immediate Past President of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS), an important organization of African American, African, and Afro Caribbean political scientists in the United States.


He is associate professor and Chair of the Department of Politics at the University of San Francisco. His undergraduate degree is from Pepperdine University and his graduate degrees were earned at the University of Southern California (USC). He has taught previously as a Visiting Associate Professor of political science at Saint Louis University in Madrid, Spain and political science and African American Studies at University of California, Berkeley.

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Marketplace: Political ads keep community papers afloat

Marketplace: Political ads keep community papers afloat | USF in the News | Scoop.it

For years now, newspapers and magazines have been dealing with a decline in advertising, including a drop in political advertising. There is an exception to that, however. Candidates still see value in periodicals that serve specific communities, including Spanish speakers and African-Americans.


“I think that many campaigns consider these as relatively inexpensive ways of reaching people that they may not be able to reach otherwise,” says Felipe Korzenny, who heads the Center for Hispanic Marketing Communication at Florida State University.


That makes these newspapers popular with local candidates, and no-brainers for national candidates who get a lot of bang for their buck. [via @marketplace]

...

“Newspaper advertising budgets are a rounding era in campaign budgets,” says Ken Goldstein, an expert on election ads at the University of San Francisco. Still, many newspapers are not eager to leave any money on the table, and they play up their ability to help advertisers target specific segments of the population.


“In some ways, newspapers were the Internet before the Internet was the Internet,” Goldstein says. In a way, micro-targeting, which is in vogue right now, started with these smaller print publications.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Ken Goldstein is a professor of politics and director of the USF in DC program. His areas of expertise include the use and impact of political advertising, voter turnout, survey methodology, and presidential elections. 

Prior to coming to USF, Ken was a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he won the University of Wisconsin's Kellet Award for his career research accomplishments and the Chancellor's Award for excellence in teaching. He also served as the president of Kantar Media CMAG, a Washington DC based political consulting firm focusing on media intelligence and is the chief record on political advertising. Former clients include both the 2012 presidential campaigns of Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Ken's experience with politics and strategy in combination with his academic training for unbiased and non-partisan analysis of research and current events, keeps him at the forefront of the political sphere.

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San Francisco Chronicle: USF devises program to create culture of campus safety

San Francisco Chronicle: USF devises program to create culture of campus safety | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Sexual violence and substance abuse remain persistent problems at colleges and universities in the Bay Area and across the country. I wish I could say these problems were limited to large schools, “party” schools or any specific type of institution, but they aren’t. Colleges like the University of San Francisco and other private and public universities need to shine a spotlight on the issue, talk openly about behaviors and relationships, support students and parents, and commit to measurable progress.


While the 2013 Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act and Title IX require all universities to provide prevention and awareness programs as part of a comprehensive response to sexual misconduct, changes to federal law alone will not solve the problem.


Creating a new culture is the single largest challenge, as universities must contend with the many societal norms that have helped to shape students’ expectations of the traditional college experience. We must push ourselves to break new ground in the prevention of harmful behaviors.


At USF, we developed a comprehensive program titled “Think About It” in collaboration with Campus Clarity, a legal compliance and online education company based in Walnut Creek. This fall, 170 universities across the country will be using our program that provides real-world scenarios that our students helped to create. [via @sfchronicle]

...

Peter Novak is vice president for student life at the University of San Francisco. 


University of San Francisco's insight:

Peter's artistic and scholarly work focuses on the intersections of language and performance, identity and culture. He teaches a wide range of courses in dramatic literature, acting, and voice and speech, as well as gender, sexuality, and theater. He founded the ASL Shakespeare project and his work on translating Twelfth Night into American Sign Language is published by Cambridge University Press, Gallaudet University Press, and is documented with a grant from the US Department of Education at: www.aslshakespeare.com. He holds an MA in English, an MFA in Acting from the American Conservatory Theater, and a doctorate in Dramaturgy and Dramatic Criticism from the Yale School of Drama. Peter is proud to be a founding faculty member of the Performing Arts Department and the Performing Arts and Social Justice major.

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CBS: Interview - Former SFPD Chief Discusses Police Militarization

CBS: Interview - Former SFPD Chief Discusses Police Militarization | USF in the News | Scoop.it

With the nation focused on the tense situation in Ferguson, Missouri, Phil Matier talks with former San Francisco police chief Anthony Ribera, director of the International Institute of Criminal Justice at USF, about the phenomenon of increasingly-militarized police forces around the country. [via @cbssf]

University of San Francisco's insight:
Assistant Professor Anthony Ribera brings a wealth of experience at the center of San Francisco civic life to both his teaching and academic work. As former Police Chief of San Francisco, Professor Ribera believes effective leaders are ethical leaders, underscoring the core values of the Jesuit tradition, promoting conscientious action for social justice. Dr. Ribera currently teaches the Law Enforcement Leadership program and has since 1997 when he wrote the original curriculum. In 2001, USF formed the International Institute of Criminal Justice Leadership and appointed Professor Ribera as its director. The Institute's annual symposium has emerged as a groundbreaking forum for progressive law enforcement training and leadership.

While Dr. Ribera feels that leadership and motivation are driven from within, the goal of his curriculum is to help awaken these attributes in students, helping them examine real world scenarios with the aim of developing real world management skills. Drawing from his own work in proactive police administration - an effort to achieve symbiotic partnership and mutual trust between police officers and the neighborhoods they serve - Professor Ribera is showing students how to improve transparency, lead with integrity and form alliances within the community.
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San Francisco Business Times: Answering the call at USF

San Francisco Business Times: Answering the call at USF | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Father Paul Fitzgerald was ordained to the priesthood in 1992 at the landmark St. Ignatius Church on the edge of the University of San Francisco’s campus. This month, the former senior vice president for academic affairs at Connecticut’s Fairfield University officially returns as president of USF. He is the 28th president in the Jesuit Catholic university’s 159 years, overseeing about 10,000 students, some 2,400 faculty and staff and a budget of $380 million. [via @sfbusinesstimes]

...

Fr. Paul Fitzgerald


Title: President, University of San Francisco


Education: Bachelor's degree in history, Santa Clara University; bachelor of philosophy, Hochschule für Philosophie, Munich; master's of divinity and sacrae theologiae licentiatus (S.T.L.) degree, Weston School of Theology; diplôme des études approfondies and docteur ès lettres in the sociology of religion at the University of Paris-LaSorbonne; pontifical doctorate in ecclesiology from the Institut Catholique de Paris


Residence: San Francisco


What’s the biggest challenge in education right now? This year we’re looking at a very strong enrollment. All of our programs are at or above their goals. The biggest challenge for the undergraduate side is to continue to make the value proposition to people that a four-year education still is a good investment.


Too many students seems like a good problem to have. We have to find housing. We’re going to have to have a fair number of triples. We have about 200 more freshmen than we had budgeted for.


What’s going to change at USF over the next year? We’re going to look really carefully and reach out to the business community in San Francisco to ask, “What can we do to serve you?” What are the educational programs they are looking for their employees and what are the areas where they’re finding it tough to find employees? We’re looking at engaging folks in the for-profit and not-for-profit worlds

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Huffington Post: 10 Reasons Fair-Trade Coffee Doesn't Work

Huffington Post: 10 Reasons Fair-Trade Coffee Doesn't Work | USF in the News | Scoop.it

I see you, smugly smiling over your morning cup of fair-trade coffee, gratified at the unimaginable impact your thoughtfully chosen beans must be bringing to poor coffee growers overseas.


Well, think again.


The academic evidence for any positive effect of fair-trade coffee on coffee growers is mixed at best. Several recent studies by researchers at Harvardthe University of Wisconsin, and the University of California indicate that fair-trade coffee has small to negligible effects on coffee growers, especially the poorest ones. The University of California researchers find that the lack of impact stems from the ill-conceived design of the fair-trade system. Indeed, a consensus among development economists indicates fair-trade coffee to be one of the least effective means for reducing poverty in developing countries. [via @huffingtonpost]
...

Bruce Wydick is a professor of economics and international studies at the University of San Francisco. His new book, The Taste of Many Mountains, is about the lives of coffee growers in Guatemala and the impact of fair-trade coffee and is published by Thomas Nelson (HarperCollins).

 

University of San Francisco's insight:

 Professor Wydick's recent work examines the impact of development programs including microfinance, child sponsorship, and animal donation programs. Other recent work studies the role of hope and aspirations in escaping poverty traps. His academic publications have appeared in the Journal of Political Economy, Economic Journal, Economica, Oxford Economic Papers, Journal of Development EconomicsWorld Development, Economic Development and Cultural Change and other journals. His recent study on the impact of child sponsorship has been the subject of stories by the BBC World ServiceUSA Today, the San Francisco Chronicle, and other media outlets. He writes forChristianity TodayPRISM, and is a regular contributor to op-ed columns for San Francisco Bay Area newspapers.

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