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San Francisco Chronicle: San Franciscans ambivalent on future, poll finds

San Francisco Chronicle: San Franciscans ambivalent on future, poll finds | USF in the News | Scoop.it

San Franciscans are pleased with the city's thriving economy, give fairly high marks to the mayor and Board of Supervisors, and believe the city as a whole is headed in the right direction.


Yet the majority say that the city has gotten much more expensive recently and that the tech-fueled economic boom isn't benefiting them or their families. They also say that the government should do more to make sure all types of people can live in San Francisco - but the majority don't trust the mayor or supervisors to accomplish that.


Those are the conflicting findings of a new poll by University of San Francisco researchers provided exclusively to The Chronicle. It shows the tug average city residents feel between happiness that the recession appears to be firmly behind us and concerns that the city is quickly becoming out of reach to wide swaths of people.


"There's anxiety out there," said Corey Cook, a political science professor at USF who conducted the poll with David Latterman, a USF lecturer and political consultant.


"There's a lot of conflict in people's minds," Cook continued. "We're glad the economy is strong, and the city's going in the right direction. At the same time, I'm not sure what this means for me, my family, my neighbors and my neighborhood." [via @sfgate]

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Janice Mirikitani and Chip Conley Speak at USF

Janice Mirikitani and Chip Conley Speak at USF | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The University of San Francisco is proud to host its Diversity Scholar and Visiting Professor Janice Mirikitani along side veteran CEO/Hotelier Chip Conley in another installment of “DiversityTalks,” annual discussions that spotlight critical diversity issues and local leaders working on these issues daily.  Sponsored by USF’s Office of Diversity Engagement and Community Outreach, the event is free, open to the public, and will take place on Tues., Oct. 7 in USF’s Presentation Theater (2350 Turk Blvd. at Tamalpais Terrace), from 4:30-6:30 p.m.

 

“DiversityTalks: The Power of Human Connection” aims to inspire the community through the stories of two distinguished and recognized leaders based in San Francisco. Mirikitani, co-founding president of the renown Glide Foundation, will discuss her life-long work as a social justice leader in San Francisco, dedicating more than 50 years to the city’s poor and marginalized.

 

Chip Conley, one of America’s most innovative entrepreneurs, whose success affirms the importance of relationships, will join Mirikitani in the conversation on how transformational focusing on others can be. Conley is also a New York Times bestselling author with his book “Emotional Equations: Simple Truths for Creating Happiness + Success.” During the Oct. 7 event, he will talk about his latest travels around the globe and his curiosity of how other cultures find happiness. 

 

“Both Janice and Chip share the selfless quality of putting others first,” said Mary J. Wardell-Ghirarduzzi, USF’s vice provost for Diversity Engagement and Community Outreach. “They are successful in their individual professions, but are like-minded in their approach—hard work, service to others, and dedication to the common good. This DiversityTalks event is a chance for Janice and Chip to talk about the value of human connections— in business, in school, in life.”

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San Francisco Chronicle: SF schools get big federal grant to address trauma

San Francisco Chronicle: SF schools get big federal grant to address trauma | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Help for students: San Francisco schools will get a $2.8 million boost in federal grants aimed at increasing mental health services and other support for kids exposed to violence and trauma.


The school district was among 22 grant recipients nationwide out of 130 applicants.


The money will support the district’s Integrated School Based Violence Intervention and Prevention Program that focuses on schools in the city’s Bayview neighborhood. More than 44 percent of Bayview residents report exposure to at least one traumatic event, district officials said.

“We are committed to ensuring all our students feel safe, healthy and ready to learn,” said Superintendent Richard Carranza, in a statement. “We have more nurses and social workers in our schools that ever before, and this grant will allow our expert service providers and our community partners to implement a comprehensive, multi-tiered array of violence prevention and intervention strategies.”


The district is partnering with the University of San Francisco and the Department of Health to provide the services to students. [via @sfchronicle]



University of San Francisco's insight:

The School of Education celebrates four decades of involved teachers, devoted leaders and caring counselors.

Our faculty and students are scholars and social justice advocates engaged within the diverse San Francisco Bay area and beyond. With over twenty masters and doctoral programs, including programs at our branch campuses and online, we welcome students who seek to make an impact and who are committed to serving those most in need.

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New York Public Radio: Indian Prime Minister Narendra Visits NY After 10-Year Ban

New York Public Radio: Indian Prime Minister Narendra Visits NY After 10-Year Ban | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi began a whirlwind three-day tour of New York, after being banned from the United States for a decade. His trip culminates with a massive reception at Madison Square Garden on Sunday.


For many of his supporters, Modi's visit to America is seen as vindication. Modi led the Indian state of Gujarat, when it experienced violent Hindu-Muslim riots. His administration was accused of allowing hundreds of Muslims to die. [via @WNYC]
...
"His words and actions in the last few years, particularly before the campaign, have been remarkably inclusive," said Vamsee Juluri, a media studies scholar at the University of San Francisco.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Vamsee Juluri received his PhD in Communication from the University of Massachusetts in 1999. His research interest is in the globalization of media audiences with an emphasis on Indian television and cinema, mythology, religion, violence and Gandhian philosophy.


His work has been published in journals such as Communication Theory, Television and New Media, European Journal of Cultural Studies, and Critical Studies in Mass Communication and in various scholarly anthologies on globalization, audiences, and Indian cinema.


He has been interviewed or quoted about media matters in KQED's Forum, PRI, the Christian Science Monitor, India-Abroad, BBC World Service, Al Jazeera television, and KPIX-CBS, and is a recipient of the College of Arts and Sciences in the Media Award. His teaching areas include Media Audience and Research, International/Global Media, Media, Stereotyping and Violence, and Gandhi in the Media.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Prop. K will do little to ease S.F.’s housing crisis

San Francisco Chronicle: Prop. K will do little to ease S.F.’s housing crisis | USF in the News | Scoop.it

San Francisco’s most pressing problem, a lack of housing affordable to the working and middle classes amid a tech boom, is no secret.


Comedian Stephen Colbert has joked on national television that the 1906 earthquake was the last time “anyone could afford to live there without six roommates.” City officeholders have dedicated countless hours over the last two years to hearings, executive directives and legislative attempts to deal with the housing crunch. In January, Mayor Ed Lee called it “a genuine crisis.”


Proposition K on the Nov. 4 ballot, the “affordable housing goals” measure, may sound timely, but it will actually do very little to deal with the problem, political analysts said. [via @sfchronicle]

...

“Ultimately, it doesn’t matter much whether voters vote for it or not,” said Corey Cook, an associate professor in politics and public affairs at the University of San Francisco. “It doesn’t have the force of law.”


“I tend not to think too much about policy statements, because rarely do they have any real policy impacts,” said political consultant David Latterman, who is not associated with the Prop. K campaign. “It’s just a statement that, of course, people are going to support. At the end of the day, it doesn’t mean much.”

University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on Race, Presidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research. He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation.


Latterman is a renowned political analyst in the San Francisco Bay Area, with expertise on the political, campaigning, and public opinion process. His main quantitative research focus is on how voters' demographics and opinions influence an election. His former company, Fall Line Analytics, has provided work on aspects of political campaigns, advertising campaigns, business development projects, and organizational surveys. Latterman has worked as an exploration petroleum geologist, a public think tank research, and public-sector utility analyst.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Where are the peace protests over Syria bombing?

San Francisco Chronicle: Where are the peace protests over Syria bombing? | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Maybe it’s war fatigue. Maybe climate change is consuming all the protest energy right now. Maybe momentum just needs to build.

But most likely, all of the above are the reasons antiwar protests didn’t erupt throughout the Bay Area, veteran activists say, after U.S. warplanes roared over the Syrian border Tuesday to bomb more than a dozen enclaves of Islamic radical jihadists into rubble.

Some activists even conceded that many people weren’t going into the streets because the militants being targeted deserved to be dealt with, if not killed.

...

Even the Bay Area’s famously liberal congressional delegation was largely silent, and Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer issued a statement saying, “We cannot stand idly by while barbaric groups threaten America and the entire world.”


Stephen Zunis, a political science professor at the University of San Francisco, said the unusually murky nature of alliances and enemies in this latest of many U.S. fights in the Middle East make it tough to muster focused outrage.


“I think a lot of people are torn,” he said. “At the start of all classes last year, I explained to my students that the U.S. government might be on the verge of war against the Syrian government, and now I have to explain why we’re going to war now against Syrian rebels. It’s a very muddled situation over there.”

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Inside Higher Ed: College Football Isn’t Attracting the Audience It Used To

Inside Higher Ed: College Football Isn’t Attracting the Audience It Used To | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Today’s uninterested students, athletics directors worry, could easily become tomorrow’s uninterested alumni. “Current students are not that important [to ticket sales], per se,” said Dan Rascher, a sports management professor at the University of San Francisco. “But you’re trying to turn those current students into former students who are still fans decades later. You want students, when they become alumni, to have that attachment and come back for the games, and that’s what’s concerning athletic departments."

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Yahoo! Sports: USF Athletes Mentor San Francisco Youth

In this feature produced by usfdons.com, student-athletes from the University of San Francisco partner with SF RBI to mentor local youth, both on and off the field. [via @yahoosports]

University of San Francisco's insight:

The University of San Francisco is located in the heart of one of the world's most innovative and stunning cities and is home to a vibrant academic community of students and faculty who achieve excellence in their fields. Its diverse student body enjoys direct access to faculty, small classes, and outstanding opportunities in the city itself. USF is San Francisco’s first university, and its Jesuit Catholic mission helps ignite a student's passion for social justice and a desire to “Change the World from Here.” For more information, please visit www.usfca.edu.

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KQED: How Obama Will Deal With the Islamic State

KQED: How Obama Will Deal With the Islamic State | USF in the News | Scoop.it

President Obama is set to announce his strategy Wednesday night for defeating the militant group known as the Islamic State, including possible expansion of U.S. airstrikes into Syria. At the same time, Democrats in the Senate are planning a bill that would authorize the U.S. military to train Syrian rebels and other foreign troops that oppose the Islamic State. Experts discuss Obama's proposed strategy, and what it means for America and the Middle East.
 

Host: Michael Krasny


Guests:
Max Boot, senior fellow for national security studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and author of "Invisible Armies: An Epic History of Guerrilla Warfare from Ancient Times to the Present"

Michael Nacht, professor of public policy at UC Berkeley and former assistant secretary of defense for global strategic affairs

Stephen Zunes, professor of politics and chair of Middle Eastern studies at the University of San Francisco and senior analyst for Foreign Policy in Focus [via @KQEDforum]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Stephen Zunes has been at USF since 1995, teaching courses on the politics of Middle East and other regions, nonviolence, conflict resolution, U.S. foreign policy, and globalization for the Politics department, the International Studies major, and the Peace & Justice Studies minor, as well as the Middle Eastern Studies minor, for which he serves as program director. He received his B.A. from Oberlin College, his M.A. from Temple University, and his Ph.D. from Cornell University. Prior to coming to USF, Dr. Zunes served on the faculty at Ithaca College, Whitman College and the University of Puget Sound. Professor Zunes serves as a writer and senior analyst for Foreign Policy in Focus, an associate editor for Peace Review, and the chair of the academic advisory committee for the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Bowen's depression revelation shifts secretary of state race

San Francisco Chronicle: Bowen's depression revelation shifts secretary of state race | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Complaints about slow election results, inadequate campaign finance reporting and archaic business-registration processes have dominated the campaign for California secretary of state, but until last weekend, those debates attracted the usual level of attention for a down-ballot race - not much.


That changed with termed-out Secretary of State Debra Bowen's revelation of her debilitating fight with depression, which shoved the office's problems into the public eye and altered the landscape for both the candidates looking to succeed her.


Democratic state Sen. Alex Padilla of Pacoima (Los Angeles County) and Republican civic engagement activist Pete Peterson are both walking a fine line approaching the Nov. 4 election - not wanting to appear to be coming down hard on a troubled incumbent, while offering their own agendas for reform and needed changes in the office. [via @sfchronicle]

...

Corey Cook, politics professor and director of the Leo McCarthy Center for Public Service at the University of San Francisco, said Bowen's problems may be the only thing many voters hear about the secretary of state's race. Although it's one of just 10 statewide elected positions, the job is "very, very low on people's radar," he said. 

University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on Race, Presidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research.


He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation.

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Catholic San Francisco: Anger, tears, hope shared at USF prayer service for Michael Brown

Catholic San Francisco: Anger, tears, hope shared at USF prayer service for Michael Brown | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Almost a month after the Aug. 9 death of Michael Brown, an unarmed teenager shot by a white patrolman in Ferguson, Missouri, University of San Francisco students, faculty and staff gathered at the school’s Privett Plaza on Sept. 3 to pray together for what incoming USF president and Jesuit Father Paul Fitzgerald called the “radical equality” of every human person.


“Michael Brown’s death is a death in the family,” he said. “It evokes suffering in us as it does in his more immediate family. We can only ask God to help us make the suffering meaningful instead of meaningless.”


Moments after the St. Ignatius Church bell rang in the noon hour, the subdued crowd bowed their heads to listen to a prayer written and read by alumnus Michael Tadesse-Bell, director of student persistence and mentorship programs and a former USF basketball player. 


Mary Wardell Ghirarduzzi, vice provost of USF’s Office of Diversity Engagement and Community Outreach, told Catholic San Francisco that the campus prayer service for Michael Brown was organized by her department, university ministry and Father Fitzgerald. [via @catholic_sf]

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San Jose Mercury News: Debate sets stage for big push in campaigns for governor

San Jose Mercury News: Debate sets stage for big push in campaigns for governor | USF in the News | Scoop.it

To hear them tell it, Gov. Jerry Brown and Republican challenger Neel Kashkari each has the other right where he wants him.


After Thursday night's often-pugnacious debate, each says he's well situated for the final 8½ weeks before Election Day. Then again, what else would a candidate say?


Kashkari, given the biggest bully pulpit he's likely to have this year, came out swinging and landed a few blows on a man who first was sworn in as governor when Kashkari was still in diapers. Brown seemed feisty and eager to sling back Kashkari's barbs. [via @mercnews]

Kashkari had a good night and showed a strong command of issues, agreed Corey Cook, who directs the University of San Francisco's Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good.
 

Still, there's "almost nothing" he can do to propel himself ahead of Brown or dramatically reshape the election, Cook said.
 

"There's no line of attack for him to follow given what voters think of the governor," he said, adding Kashkari's biggest impact might come after Election Day.
 

"The question now is can he make a compelling case to Republicans about where the party needs to go."


University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on RacePresidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research.


He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation. 

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USF Education Dean Talks Education & The Arts, Sept. 10

USF Education Dean Talks Education & The Arts, Sept. 10 | USF in the News | Scoop.it
University of San Francisco's insight:

A conversation with Kevin Kumashiro

In recognition of National Arts in Education Week, the University of San Francisco (USF) School of Education is proud to host, “Education, Social Justice, and the Arts: Seeing the Connections,” a lecture event featuring Dean Kevin Kumashiro. The special presentation will be in McLaren 252 on Wednesday, September 10 at 6:30 p.m.
 

Sharing lessons from his own teaching, Dean Kumashiro will examine the role that the arts can play in advancing educational quality and social justice. His lecture will give insight on reframing the debate on educational reform, and how the arts can be integrated in the curriculum to invite radically different ways in envisioning learning, teaching, and schools for historically underserved communities.


The former teacher and education activist was appointed as dean of the School of Education in 2013. During his time at USF, Kumashiro has continued to lead the school in its commitment to community by educating involved teachers, devoted leaders, and caring counselors.

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Huffington Post: 16 Reasons Why Opening Our Borders Makes More Sense Than Militarizing Them

Huffington Post: 16 Reasons Why Opening Our Borders Makes More Sense Than Militarizing Them | USF in the News | Scoop.it

What would happen if the United States suddenly stopped building walls and instead flung open its borders, not unlike the European Union has done among the member countries of the common market?


Conservatives malign the notion and liberals, even radical ones, haven't exactly embraced the "open borders" concept. But the idea isn't as radical as it may seem. For most of its history, the United States has had, for all practical purposes, open borders, according to University of San Francisco law professor Bill Hing.


"Really, the United States was an open-border situation, worldwide, up through the early 1900s -- except for Asians," Hing told The Huffington Post. "There were Asian-exclusion laws. But if you put that aside, it was open borders for the rest of the world." [via @huffingtonpost]

...

As Bill Hing points out, when the European Union was created, effectively allowing the free movement of EU citizens across the common market's borders, a funny thing happened. Countries once known for their high output of immigrants, like Spain, Portugal and Ireland, became immigrant-receiving countries -- a pattern that held until the worldwide economic crisis in 2007.


"Why?" says Hing. "Because there was huge investment in their economies. If we approach immigration the way they did in the EU [...] you actually will not see a hysterical flood of migrants across the border. But I do think it needs to be coupled with serious investment in poor areas of Mexico."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Throughout his career, Professor Bill Ong Hing pursued social justice through a combination of community work, litigation, and scholarship. He is the author of numerous academic and practice-oriented publications on immigration policy and race relations, including Ethical Borders—NAFTA, Globalization, and Mexican Migration(Temple University Press, 2010), Deporting Our Souls-Morality, Values, and Immigration Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2006), Defining America Through Immigration Policy (Temple University Press, 2004), and Making and Remaking Asian America Through Immigration Policy (Stanford University Press, 1993). His book To Be An American: Cultural Pluralism and the Rhetoric of Assimilation (NYU Press, 1997) received the award for Outstanding Academic Book by the librarians' journal Choice. At UC Davis, Hing directed the law school clinical program. He was also co-counsel in the precedent-setting U.S. Supreme Court asylum case, INS v. Cardoza-Fonseca (1987). Hing is the founder of the Immigrant Legal Resource Center in San Francisco and continues to volunteer as general counsel for this organization. He serves on the National Advisory Council of the Asian American Justice Center in Washington, D.C.

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Catholic San Francisco: St. Ignatius marks anniversary as church, parish

Catholic San Francisco: St. Ignatius marks anniversary as church, parish | USF in the News | Scoop.it

St. Ignatius Parish will celebrate the centennial of the church and its 20th anniversary as a parish October 4 with a trio of commemorative activities open to the public.

“We’ve been knocking it out of the park for 20 years,” Jesuit Father Greg Bonfiglio, who was installed as fourth pastor of St. Ignatius Church in 2012, told Catholic San Francisco.

The twin-spired church located on a bluff on Fulton Street at Parker Street on the USF campus is the legacy of a continuous Jesuit presence in San Francisco since 1849, when three Italian Jesuit priests arrived to minister to the swelling gold rush-era population.

[via @catholic_sf]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Happy Centennial, St. Ignatius!

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Los Angeles Times: Democratic candidates working hard to get women to the polls

Los Angeles Times: Democratic candidates working hard to get women to the polls | USF in the News | Scoop.it

When Rep. Julia Brownley aired the first television ad of her fall reelection campaign, she aimed the 30-second spot directly at women.


As Democratic leaders struggle to keep control of the U.S. Senate and minimize losses of House seats this fall, Brownley's pitch is key. She and other Democratic candidates are focusing on women, who have strongly favored the party in recent elections and helped President Obama keep his job two years ago. [via @latimes]

...

Ken Goldstein, a professor of politics at the University of San Francisco, said it makes sense for Democrats to focus on women this year, especially in close races, but increasing turnout won't be easy.


"Democrats are getting very good," Goldstein said, at finding which voters to talk to and sending the right messages. "But there is only so much you can do to get people who don't feel like voting to vote."


University of San Francisco's insight:

Ken Goldstein is a professor of politics and director of the USF in DC program. His areas of expertise include the use and impact of political advertising, voter turnout, survey methodology, and presidential elections.


Prior to coming to USF, Ken was a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he won the University of Wisconsin's Kellet Award for his career research accomplishments and the Chancellor's Award for excellence in teaching. He also served as the president of Kantar Media CMAG, a Washington DC based political consulting firm focusing on media intelligence and is the chief record on political advertising. Former clients include both the 2012 presidential campaigns of Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Ken's experience with politics and strategy in combination with his academic training for unbiased and non-partisan analysis of research and current events, keeps him at the forefront of the political sphere.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Fire chief’s problems complicated by calls for resignation

San Francisco Chronicle: Fire chief’s problems complicated by calls for resignation | USF in the News | Scoop.it

San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White’s job has never been easy — but no one’s ever called for her head. Until now.


The city’s first female fire chief, appointed in 2004, has weathered a series of controversies over the past decade, including lawsuits over promotional exams, scandals over firefighters drinking on duty and the death of a young woman who was run over by two Fire Department rigs after last year’s Asiana Airlines crash at San Francisco International Airport.

But her latest issue — ambulances taking too long to respond to medical emergencies — has caused a crisis of confidence that could end her career.

...

Rich Callahan, chairman of the University of San Francisco’s department of public and nonprofit administration, said public sector leaders such as Hayes-White work in “as complex a leadership environment as you can find in any sector” — it’s a far more difficult role than being a tech executive, for example.


That complexity does not in any shape or form compare to leading a public sector agency, particularly in San Francisco, which is a combined city and county,” said Callahan, an expert in government leadership. “Whether it’s the fire chief or anyone else, it’s complex structurally, politically — and public safety adds another level of complexity.” [via @sfchronicle]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Professor Richard Callahan is a highly active educator and researcher focused on leadership behaviors that are effective in complex, demanding, and dynamic environments. An invaluable member of the USF community, Dr. Callahan is Chair of the Department of Public and Nonprofit Administration, Director of the Master of Public Administration program, and he serves as the Faculty Representative to the USF Board of Trustees.

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BusinessWeek: Google Wi-Fi Roundup Has Lawyers Chasing Landmark Jackpot

BusinessWeek: Google Wi-Fi Roundup Has Lawyers Chasing Landmark Jackpot | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Data from two hard drives locked up in the San Francisco federal courthouse may make or break an effort to hold Google Inc. (GOOG:US) to account for what privacy advocates call an unprecedented corporate wiretapping case.


If 22 people who sued the company can pinpoint their personal data in a massive cache of communications that Google’s Street View cars captured from private Wi-Fi networks, their lawyers may be able to seek billions of dollars of damages from the the world’s largest search engine owner.


If they come up empty-handed, an outcome the company that pioneered search optimization is betting on, the case will join a stack of failed privacy lawsuits accusing Google, Apple Inc. (AAPL:US)Facebook Inc. (FB:US) and other technology companies of tracking, capturing or sharing personal information.

“You have to show that you were the victim,” said Susan Freiwald, a law professor at University of San Francisco School of Law. “If they don’t, then why should they get money?”


The battle for damages against Google gets simpler if the plaintiffs find their communications on the drives, she said. Victims of wiretapping don’t have to show they suffered any harm or that the perpetrator profited from the data collection, said Freiwald, who isn’t involved in the case. [via @BW]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Professor Susan Freiwald publishes and presents widely in the areas of cyberlaw and information privacy. A former software developer, Freiwald has authored and co-authored amicus briefs in major cases involving electronic surveillance laws. She also regularly assists the Electronic Frontier Foundation with electronic surveillance litigation efforts and has served on the board of the Northern California American Civil Liberties Union.

Education

  • BA, Harvard University
  • JD, Harvard University
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Catholic San Francisco: USF names British Jesuit new Lo Schiavo Chair in Catholic Social Thought

Catholic San Francisco: USF names British Jesuit new Lo Schiavo Chair in Catholic Social Thought | USF in the News | Scoop.it

British Jesuit Father Frank Turner will return to the University of San Francisco during the 2014-2015 academic year as the new Anna and Joseph Lo Schiavo Chair in Catholic Social Thought, the university announced Sept. 18.


The purpose of the Anna and Joseph Lo Schiavo Chair is to promote and advance Jesuit identity and ideals at USF, either by a professorship held by a Jesuit or by symposia or conferences that approach current issues from a Catholic moral perspective. The role is a joint appointment by the Department of Theology and Religious Studies and the Joan and Ralph Lane Center for Catholic Studies and Social Thought.


The Lane Center staff and the new chair will work to advance the scholarship and application of the Catholic intellectual tradition in the church and society with an emphasis on social concerns. Father Turner served as the Lane Center’s summer scholar in residence in 2012.


“I hope to have done some serious research on how Catholic social teaching can develop internally, and be more effective externally,” Father Turner said in an email to Catholic San Francisco. 

[via @catholic_sf]

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SF Examiner: USF professor turns mushrooms into versatile products

SF Examiner: USF professor turns mushrooms into versatile products | USF in the News | Scoop.it

It started as an accident.


When Philip Ross, a fine-arts professor at the University of San Francisco since 2008, began hunting mushrooms in 1987 for cooking and medicinal purposes -- and eventually for art -- he had no idea he would one day use fungi to create, say, a chair or a table.


It wasn't until Ross tried to destroy an old sculpture he had created using the mycelium -- or tubular filaments -- from mushrooms that he realized its versatile, indestructible qualities.


"We had a bonfire outside of the studios," said Ross, whose work involving mushrooms has been displayed in numerous museums including at the Exploratorium in July. "I was sure that this thing was going to go up in giant flames, [but] it sat there for 20 minutes -- a huge, dry, cellulosic thing. The sculpture wouldn't burn. It was naturally fire-retardant."


Another time, Ross threw an 8-inch square, dried-up sculpture also made from mushroom materials against a wall in his studio. It remained intact. [via @sfexaminer]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Philip Ross makes sculptural artworks that combine natural and technologically advanced materials. The projects he is engaged with are literally grown into being, and are at once highly crafted and naturally formed, skillfully manipulated and sloppily organic.

Philip has taught at UC Berkeley and was a recent Porter Fellow at UC Santa Cruz. He received his MFA from Stanford University, where he has also taught drawing and sculpture. While working in both traditional and experimental materials, Philip also curates exhibitions on the relationship between art and science, most recently putting together a show on biotechnology for the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco.

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The Washington Post: Jerry Brown’s campaign has $22 million and he hasn’t even aired any ads. If he wanted, this is how much he could buy.

The Washington Post: Jerry Brown’s campaign has $22 million and he hasn’t even aired any ads. If he wanted, this is how much he could buy. | USF in the News | Scoop.it

It’s a “non-campaign” campaign, the San Francisco Chronicle pointed out.


“Jerry Brown himself is a brand, and his brand is insulated against Obama and insulated against the Legislature,” University of San Francisco Professor Corey Cook told the Chronicle.


“Jerry is operating as if he’s at the start of his next term, not as if he’s seeking reelection.”


But what if he did start operating as if he’s running for reelection?

Brown’s war chest is enough to get him airtime across the state comfortably through to November. Dan Newman, a Brown spokesman, said “very roughly,” $2.5 million can buy you “a decent week” statewide.

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San Jose Mercury News: Honda, Khanna spar over what it means to be an effective congressman

San Jose Mercury News: Honda, Khanna spar over what it means to be an effective congressman | USF in the News | Scoop.it

With so many gripes about gridlock and partisanship fouling up the political process, Californians voted four years ago to switch to a "top two" primary election system to move more politicians to the middle.


Those who created California's new system argued that having candidates of all parties compete in a primary -- which can result in two candidates from the same party going head to head in the general election -- would encourage politicians to embrace bipartisanship.


It seems to be working, some experts say.


Look no further than the battle to represent Silicon Valley's 17th Congressional District, where one of Democratic challenger Ro Khanna's main campaign themes is that Rep. Mike Honda, D-San Jose, is way too partisan to get much done. [@mercnews]
...
The tussle is a "unique California twist," said Ken Goldstein, a politics professor who directs the University of San Francisco's program in Washington, D.C.


In a majority of U.S. states, "most incumbents worry about being attacked in the primary for not being pure enough," he said. But with two candidates from the same party as the only choices in November, "it sets up a situation where they can be attacked from their own side for being too pure."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Ken Goldstein is a professor of politics and director of the USF in DC program. His areas of expertise include the use and impact of political advertising, voter turnout, survey methodology, and presidential elections.


Prior to coming to USF, Ken was a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he won the University of Wisconsin's Kellet Award for his career research accomplishments and the Chancellor's Award for excellence in teaching. He also served as the president of Kantar Media CMAG, a Washington DC based political consulting firm focusing on media intelligence and is the chief record on political advertising. Former clients include both the 2012 presidential campaigns of Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Ken's experience with politics and strategy in combination with his academic training for unbiased and non-partisan analysis of research and current events, keeps him at the forefront of the political sphere.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Jerry Brown surges ahead with the 'non-campaign' campaign

San Francisco Chronicle: Jerry Brown surges ahead with the 'non-campaign' campaign | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Gov. Jerry Brown has $22 million in the bank and a 21-point lead in the polls, but as he seeks a historic fourth term, he's conducting one of the most unusual re-election campaigns ever witnessed by state voters - one in which he hasn't starred in a single TV or radio spot, campaign mailer, or Web video.


With less than three weeks to go before Californians can cast ballots, Brown's campaign spokesman said Tuesday that the governor doesn't even plan to be the star of his own appeals to voters this year. Instead, he'll focus on urging them to pass a pair of bond measures. [via @sfchronicle]

...

"Jerry Brown himself is a brand, and his brand is insulated against Obama and insulated against the Legislature," said politics Professor Corey Cook, who heads the University of San Francisco's Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service.


"He's been so effective in being above the political fray that he can just swoop in and say, 'I'm Jerry Brown - and I'm done,' " Cook said. "Jerry is operating as if he's at the start of his next term, not as if he's seeking re-election.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Prior to joining the faculty at USF, Professor Cook has taught courses in American politics at the University of Wisconsin, San Jose State University, Rutgers University, and San Francisco State University. His doctoral dissertation considers the impact of race and gender on political representation and explores the contemporary significance of identity politics. Cook has published academic articles in the DuBois Journal of Social Science Research on Race, Presidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research.


He has completed research projects surrounding the usage of Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco and a manuscript about promoting civic engagement through community-based research. His current research focuses on election results and political geography in California. He teaches courses in American Politics specializing in political institutions, urban and state politics, and the dynamics of political representation.

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San Francisco Chronicle: New Common Core math standards add up to big changes

San Francisco Chronicle: New Common Core math standards add up to big changes | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Some say the new Common Core math standards are too easy. Others say they're too hard or too focused on ideas rather than correct answers.

Whatever they are, they're in full effect in California public school classrooms this year.


The new standards remain the subject of a national debate as politicians bicker over whether national standards are a federal takeover of state school systems. [via @sfchronicle]

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"The Common Core standards are meant to show people what students should know and be able to do," said Peter Williamson, associate professor of teacher education at theUniversity of San Francisco. "I think that we've come from an era of scripted curriculum materials ... of teachers being told how to teach and what to teach. The Common Core is asking us to step away from that and to teach without those scripts."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Williamson is an assistant professor of teacher education in the graduate School of Education at the University of San Francisco. Formerly the Director of Stanford's Teachers for a New Era project and an instructor in the Stanford Teacher Education Program, Peter completed his Ph.D. at Stanford in Curriculum and Teacher Education. Before coming to Stanford, Peter taught middle and high school English and journalism in San Francisco Bay Area schools, and worked with advocacy agencies focusing on urban youth. His research interests include the teaching and learning of practice, teacher professional development, teacher effectiveness, urban education, and language acquisition.

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USF and Prebacked Host MedHack Sept. 6-7

USF and Prebacked Host MedHack Sept. 6-7 | USF in the News | Scoop.it
University of San Francisco's insight:

A Hackathon focused on healthcare technology

The University of San Francisco (USF) is teaming up with Prebacked, a company making social good entrepreneurship as accessible and profitable as social network entrepreneurship, to host MedHack, a weekend-long hackathon for talented developers and medical experts to spark new innovations in health care technology. The event will take place in the McLaren Conference Center on the USF campus (2130 Fulton Street in San Francisco), September 6-7.


The hackathon involves participants teaming up with like-minded individuals and developing new healthcare technology for web, mobile, or hardware. Each team will compete against each other, and a panel of entrepreneurs, healthcare, and technology professionals will judge the innovative products.


“USF and Prebacked share a belief that the best minds of our generation can use their intelligence and ingenuity to transform, improve, and build better the world,” said Prebacked Founder and CEO Garrett Dunham. “We are proud that USF is our host and partner for MedHack and we can’t wait to see what participants develop.”

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China Daily USA: Firms hear success tips in the US

China Daily USA: Firms hear success tips in the US | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Human capital is the key to success for Chinese companies doing business in the US, a panel discussion suggested.

China's General Chamber of Commerce-USA and the China Business Studies Initiative of the University of San Francisco held a panel discussion on the release of a new survey report Chinese Enterprises in US at the University of San Francisco on Aug 29.


Representatives of local Chinese enterprises, business schools, law firms and overseas organizations joined in the discussion. The survey was conducted by Yang Xiaohua, associate professor at the University of San Francisco, and Richard Huang, executive director of China General Chamber of Commerce-USA.


Other panelists included Ben Chen, a representative of China Unicom; Jeff Leader, a governmental affairs consultant; and Marshall Meyer, a professor from Wharton School of Business.

"This event is aimed at bringing policy makers, business insiders, business organizations and our students together to assist Chinese companies in going global," said Yang.

...

[via @ChinaDailyUSA]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Associate Professor Xiaohua Yang is garnering recognition in both the international academic community and media (Wenzhou Daily, Sing Tao Daily, and Lihong Radio) for her research on Chinese enterprises in the U.S. and the globalization of Chinese business. She explores, among other key specialties, the relationship between brand recognition and firm performance, internationalization of Chinese firms, R&D strategic alliances, and foreign market entry strategies.

Dr. Yang is frequently invited to speak at international business conferences, forums and symposia - including HYSTA annual conference, Berkeley China Forum, Wenzhou Pareto Public Policy Colloquium, and Harvard Conference: China Goes Global. She brings her extensive academic and professional experience in Australia, Finland, Armenia, China, Taiwan, and the U.S. to her students and truly exemplifies the Jesuit hallmark of a global perspective.

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