USF in the News
Follow
43.7K views | +34 today
 
Scoop.it!

San Francisco Chronicle: San Franciscans ambivalent on future, poll finds

San Francisco Chronicle: San Franciscans ambivalent on future, poll finds | USF in the News | Scoop.it

San Franciscans are pleased with the city's thriving economy, give fairly high marks to the mayor and Board of Supervisors, and believe the city as a whole is headed in the right direction.


Yet the majority say that the city has gotten much more expensive recently and that the tech-fueled economic boom isn't benefiting them or their families. They also say that the government should do more to make sure all types of people can live in San Francisco - but the majority don't trust the mayor or supervisors to accomplish that.


Those are the conflicting findings of a new poll by University of San Francisco researchers provided exclusively to The Chronicle. It shows the tug average city residents feel between happiness that the recession appears to be firmly behind us and concerns that the city is quickly becoming out of reach to wide swaths of people.


"There's anxiety out there," said Corey Cook, a political science professor at USF who conducted the poll with David Latterman, a USF lecturer and political consultant.


"There's a lot of conflict in people's minds," Cook continued. "We're glad the economy is strong, and the city's going in the right direction. At the same time, I'm not sure what this means for me, my family, my neighbors and my neighborhood." [via @sfgate]

more...
No comment yet.
USF in the News
USF in the News
News and mentions of the University of San Francisco
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

Bloomberg: Without Declaring His Candidacy, Biden Places Third in Iowa

Bloomberg: Without Declaring His Candidacy, Biden Places Third in Iowa | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Vice President Joe Biden would enter Iowa in a distant third place among Democrats if he decides to run for president, but his rising popularity, combined with signs of trouble for Hillary Clinton, means the early caucus state may be less of an obstacle to Biden this time than it was in 2008.

[via @bpolitics]

...

“He’s like, ‘Wow I’m at 14 and I haven’t even announced, and everybody likes me, but more importantly Hillary’s way under 50 and Bernie’s within striking distance,’” said Ken Goldstein, professor of politics at the University of San Francisco and Bloomberg Politics' polling and advertising analyst.


“Biden is a bet on potential. He’s got high favorability and then if Hillary implodes, if Hillary’s a disaster in the debate, if another scandal comes up, if Bernie beats Hillary in Iowa and New Hampshire, Biden’s strong favorability is then poised to take advantage of those things,” Goldstein added.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

89.3 KPCC - Southern California Public Radio: Who are America's next black leaders?

89.3 KPCC - Southern California Public Radio: Who are America's next black leaders? | USF in the News | Scoop.it

NAACP chairman Julian Bond died last weekend at the age of 75. Bond was one of the last remaining "old guard" champions of the civil rights movement.   [via @KPCC]

...

Clarence Jones is a visiting professor at the University of San Francisco and former advisor, lawyer and speechwriter for Martin Luther King Junior. He says much of the civil rights movement’s success can be attributed to King’s nonviolent approach.


When asked about the future of black leadership, Clarence Jones says he’s optimistic, and  points to the #BlackLivesMatter movement as an example of an effective modern protest.
 

“The Black Lives Matter movement, the best thing I can say is they’re like the canary in the coal mine--it’s like a mirror they’re holding up to America … The test of the conscience and the integrity of the American nation today depends on how they respond to the pain and the anguish of the Black Lives Matter movement."


more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Chicago Tribune: Late Bears assistant coach Dick Stanfel gets Hall of Fame nomination

Chicago Tribune: Late Bears assistant coach Dick Stanfel gets Hall of Fame nomination | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Less than two months after his death, Dick Stanfel will get another shot at the Pro Football Hall of Fame.



The all-decade offensive lineman for the Lions in the 1950s and revered offensive line coach of the 1985 Bears is one of two nominees by the Seniors Committee, which met Wednesday in Canton, Ohio. Also nominated was quarterback Kenny Stabler, who died last month.

[via @chicagotribune]

...

The Lions drafted Stanfel in 1951 from the University of San Francisco, a football powerhouse at the time, and the right guard was part of two championship teams in four seasons, named the team’s MVP after the 1953 season over stars like Bobby Layne and Doak Walker. Stanfel was traded to the Redskins in 1956. He was a five-time Pro Bowl selection.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Al Jazeera: The taxing problem of bringing up baby on a meager wage

Al Jazeera: The taxing problem of bringing up baby on a meager wage | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The poverty rate for children being raised by a single mother is high. A 2013 report by the National Women’s Law Center determined that close to 40 percent of female-headed families with children were in poverty, compared with under 20 percent of male-headed families and 7.6 percent headed by a married couple. And more than half of female-headed households were living in extreme poverty, with income less than half the federal poverty level. 

[via @ajam]

...

"As a general rule, tax law is not something which comes easily for most individuals," said Dominic L. Daher, the director of internal audit and tax compliance at the University of San Francisco. "The [earned income tax credit] is no exception. In fact, the EITC is so complicated, the Internal Revenue Service has an entire 36-page publication dedicated solely to it."  

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dominic L. Daher is the director of internal audit and tax compliance for the University of San Francisco, and an adjunct professor at the School of Law. Daher is the author of over 40 published articles that deal with various aspects of federal tax law and accounting issues, including one which has been cited in a report to the United States Congress by the National Taxpayer Advocate and quoted in Forbes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

The Sacramento Bee: Another View - Fracking threatens our children’s health

The Sacramento Bee: Another View - Fracking threatens our children’s health | USF in the News | Scoop.it

By Barbara Sattler


They were clearly planted as a buffer, if only a visual one – a stand of trees, side by side, separating a children’s playing field, a day care center and grammar school from an extensive gas and oil field. On one side of the trees there are oil pump jacks, trucks and an elaborate pipe system. On the other side there are children, ages 2 to 12.


The oil industry insists that fracking is safe (“Here’s what’s known about fracking risks,” Viewpoints, July 29). But the story of the children’s health is being foretold by the trees – they are all dead.

[via @sacbee_news]


University of San Francisco's insight:

Barbara Sattler, RN, DrPH, FAAN, is a professor at the School of Nursing and specializes in public health. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

WalletHub.com: 2015’s Most & Least Energy-Expensive States

WalletHub.com: 2015’s Most & Least Energy-Expensive States | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Get ready to crank up those air conditioners. July tends to be the hottest month of the year, and the heat will likely burn a hole through your wallet. In fact, about 7.3 percent of the average consumer’s total annual income goes to energy costs. So if you’re planning to relocate this summer, perhaps to start a new job, you may want to consider the disparity in energy costs among the candidate states on your short list.

[via @wallethub]

...

What are some good tips for saving money on energy bills?

First, an energy audit or review. Understand what services each form of energy is providing: electricity to run the refrigerator, natural gas for water heating. Identify where energy for space heating or cooling is being wasted: through gaps in the framing, un-insulated walls/attics/floors. Consider which appliances could be improved: low-cost low-flow shower heads save water and energy. And always remember the smart, low-tech option: you.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Professor Stephanie B. Ohshita works on energy–based solutions to multiple environmental problems–from local air pollution to global climate change–and combines engineering with tools from political economy and organizational analysis. With a geographic focus on China, Japan, and the US, her research and teaching examine energy and carbon saving strategies; policy design and implementation; international cooperation; the diffusion of clean and efficient technology; emissions inventories; and risk management.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

The San Francisco Chronicle: Hires and Promotions, Aug. 5

The San Francisco Chronicle: Hires and Promotions, Aug. 5 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The University of San Francisco Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good named David Donahue as senior director. [via @sfchronicle]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

The Wall Street Journal: Venture Capitalists’ Confidence Index Slips in Second Quarter

The Wall Street Journal: Venture Capitalists’ Confidence Index Slips in Second Quarter | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Despite venture capitalists’ faith in the underlying health of the industry, their confidence is sliding a bit, mainly because of worries about inflated valuations, a survey says.

The quarterly study by Mark Cannice, a University of San Francisco professor, said the confidence level of Silicon Valley VCs declined for the second quarter in a row, to 3.73, down from 3.81 in the first three months of the year. Cannice’s index rates confidence levels on a scale of 1 to 5 from a survey of more than two dozen investors based in Silicon Valley.

Dr. Cannice said the latest measurement matched the 11-year average of the Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index, hitting its lowest point in two years. The index scored a high of 4.38 in the first quarter of 2007 and a low of 2.77 in the fourth quarter of 2008, during the financial crisis.

The index aims to measure investors’ expectations for the next six to 18 months.

“While the powerful ecosystem in Silicon Valley for venture creation, innovation, and long-term value creation continues to grow stronger, short to medium-term prospects for positive investment results appear somewhat less certain,” Dr. Cannice wrote.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

San Francisco Chronicle: Venture capitalists’ confidence down, USF report finds

San Francisco Chronicle: Venture capitalists’ confidence down, USF report finds | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Silicon Valley’s biggest gamblers may be increasingly concerned about making bets, according to a University of San Francisco study released Tuesday.


Venture capitalists’ confidence in their industry declined for the second consecutive quarter, according to the Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index Report, based on a survey of 28 Bay Area venture capitalists in June.


Clocking in at 3.7 out of 5, the confidence index declined slightly from 3.8 in the first quarter of this year, reaching a two-year low.


“It’s not bad, but what they bring out are some issues,” said Mark Cannice, a professor of entrepreneurship and innovation at the University of San Francisco’s School of Management who has been conducting the survey quarterly since 2004. Since then, confidence hit an all-time high of 4.4 in the first quarter of 2007. It bottomed out at 2.8 in the fourth quarter of 2008 — just months before the public markets tanked in the beginning of the recession. [via @sfchronicle]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

The Huffington Post: Remembering Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner- 50th Anniversary of the 1965 Voting Rights Act

The Huffington Post: Remembering Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner- 50th Anniversary of the 1965 Voting Rights Act | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Next week on the date of the anniversary of the signing of the Act, Republican presidential primary contenders will be holding their first TV debate. Think about this for a moment: On the 50th Anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, the Republican party today, along with Chief Justice Roberts' 2014 Shelby v Holder decision, has done more to dismantle the Act, than any other effort in recent memory. [via @blackvoices]

University of San Francisco's insight:

This piece in the Huffington Post was written by Clarence B. Jones, Diversity Visiting Professor at the University of San Francisco.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Forbes: Startup Schools - America's Most Entrepreneurial Universities 2015

Forbes: Startup Schools - America's Most Entrepreneurial Universities 2015 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The usual suspects still rule our annual Most Entrepreneurial Research Universities this year, withStanford University on top once again. Only 3 newcomers make it on top 20: Brigham Young University, Northeastern and University of San Francisco, while San Diego State, UC Santa Barbara and Syracuse fell behind.

FORBES ranked the country’s most entrepreneurial schools based on the numbers of alumni and students who have identified themselves as founders and business owners on LinkedIn LNKD -2.20%(adjusted to total student body size). 
more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

The Advocate: Gov. Bobby Jindal TV buy in Iowa part of ‘early state’ strategy

The Advocate: Gov. Bobby Jindal TV buy in Iowa part of ‘early state’ strategy | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In farmhouses, suburban split-levels and studio apartments across Iowa, the image of Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal shimmers on television screens as he talks up his belief in an America where ethnic identities dissolve in the melting pot of assimilation.



“I am tired of hyphenated Americans,” Jindal, the U.S.-born child of immigrants from India, says in the ad. “We’re not Indian-Americans or African-Americans or Asian-Americans. We’re all Americans.”

As Jindal, 44, campaigns for the 2016 Republican nomination for president, the 30-second TV spot aims to raise his profile among Republican voters in Iowa, who will caucus Feb. 1 to start the official nomination process.


“He’s obviously putting his eggs in the Iowa basket, both in terms of investment of his time and investment of his resources in a place that he needs to break out in,” said Kenneth Goldstein, a political scientist at the University of San Francisco and a co-author of the 2007 book, “Campaign Advertising and American Democracy.” [via @theadvocatebr]




more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

China Daily: Chinese doing business in the U.S. need to do their homework

China Daily: Chinese doing business in the U.S. need to do their homework | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Chinese companies that do - or want to do - business in the U.S. can benefit with a little friendly reminder: assimilation and adaptation to the local business culture is critical. You could even call it the "make or break" rule.


At a seminar on Friday at Stanford University, a dozen or so Chinese businessmen were bombarded over and over again with the same word - localization - by a panel of government officials, scholars and industry insiders.


"I don't want to exaggerate the importance of localization," said moderator Stanley Kwong, who teaches globalization strategies at the School of Management at the University of San Francisco, "but as soon as you set foot on American soil, you have to learn to survive and thrive in an alien business culture."


The world's two largest economies remain active in a wide-spectrum of exchange and communication. In 2013, for the first time China's investment in the U.S., $14 billion, outpaced U.S. investment into China. America received $12 billion in investment from China in 2014, still enough to make the U.S. the No 1 destination country for Chinese outward investment. [via @ChinaDailyUSA]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

NBC: The Case at the Heart of the Birthright Citizenship Battle

NBC: The Case at the Heart of the Birthright Citizenship Battle | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Donald Trump's immigration plan, entitled "Defend the Laws and Constitution of the United States," calls for an end to "birthright citizenship."


But legal and historical scholars say the GOP front-runner's challenge attempts to trump the Constitution itself, as well as an important chapter in Asian American history. [via @NBCNews]

...

Birthright citizenship has been considered "settled law" since March 28, 1898, said John Trasvina, the Dean of the University of San Francisco Law School in an interview with NBC News.


"The U.S. Supreme Court noted that the nation's founders adopted Anglo American law which itself dated back to 1608 to interpret the meaning of the 14th Amendment -- if you are born here, you are a United States citizen," said Trasvina.


He notes that the legal avenue to challenging and amending the Constitution would be "lengthy, divisive, and not likely to be successful."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

SF Chronicle: Stock market turmoil is bad news for startups hoping to go public

SF Chronicle: Stock market turmoil is bad news for startups hoping to go public | USF in the News | Scoop.it

With the stock markets continuing to hemorrhage money, tech startups that waited too long to go public may be out of luck.

[via @sfchronicle]

...

However, venture capitalists will invest in startups only if they see a healthy IPO market, said Mark Cannice, a professor of entrepreneurship and innovation at the University of San Francisco School of Management.

“VC confidence is tied to the ability to take portfolio companies to a successful exit,” he said.

Prior to the recent stock market turmoil, VC confidence levels were already starting to fall, according to a quarterly survey conducted by Cannice.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

KPIX-TV (CBS): Kevin Kumashiro

Dean Kevin Kumashiro and a School of Education alumna appeared on KPIX-SF to comment on San Francisco’s teacher shortage. Kumashiro said job satisfaction has plummeted in the last few years. Teachers are pressured by standardized test and the low pay makes it difficult to live in the city.

[via @CBSSF]


University of San Francisco's insight:

Kevin Kumashiro was appointed as dean of the School of Education in 2013. He is an award-winning author with nine books on anti-oppressive education and activism, including "Troubling Education," recipient of the 2003 Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award, and his most recent, "Bad Teacher!: How Blaming Teachers Distorts the Bigger Picture." He is the founding director of the Center for Anti-Oppressive Education and served as the primary investigator and director of UIC AANAPISI Initiative, funded by $4 million in U.S. Department of Education grants to support Asian American and Pacific Islander students in higher education.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

The New Yorker: Latin America’s Transgender-Rights Leaders

The New Yorker: Latin America’s Transgender-Rights Leaders | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Trans-rights victories in Colombia and other Latin American countries signal a new front in the push for equality, but ingrained conservatism remains.

...

Elisabeth Jay Friedman, a professor of politics and Latin American studies at the University of San Francisco, told me that the push for trans rights can “read conservative” in Latin American countries. “Giving women full control over their reproductive capacity deeply challenges gender expectations and roles, and cannot be easily legitimized as part of a human-rights framework (though feminists have tried),” she said. “Getting people’s gender ‘right’ presupposes that gender is fairly static.”

University of San Francisco's insight:

Elisabeth Jay Friedman was awarded her BA by Barnard College (1988) and her MA/PhD by Stanford University (1997). She has also published articles on transnational women's organizingwomen's rights in Latin America, and same-sex marriage. Her current research project examines the intersection of internet technology with gender equality and lesbian organizing in Latin America. She is also editing the collection Testing the Transformation: Gender, Sexuality, and the Latin American Left.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

The Washington Post: He’s an American success story . . . but it’s a difficult path to citizenship

The Washington Post: He’s an American success story . . . but it’s a difficult path to citizenship | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Miguel Aguilar’s boyhood home in Mexico is a two-story brick structure on the corner of Litografos and Libramiento Regional streets. Beyond a narrow park and divided road, a concrete channel cradles the Rio Grande and divides Ciudad Juarez from El Paso. ¶ Some 1.5 million people live in the Mexican border city; the Aguilars practically lived on the border. ¶ A mighty kick was capable of launching a soccer ball over the trickle of water and tall metal barriers. “Unfortunately, we didn’t have that many to spare,” the D.C. United rookie midfielder joked recently.

[via @washingtonpost]

...

Eleven years later, Aguilar has made it through. He is neither a U.S. citizen nor a permanent resident, instead navigating a legal process that might be unique among professional athletes in the United States. In January, a month after he graduated early from the University of San Francisco, United claimed him with the 17th overall pick in the MLS draft.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Historic Collection of Native Baskets from California’s Missions at USF

Historic Collection of Native Baskets from California’s Missions at USF | USF in the News | Scoop.it

University of San Francisco's Thacher Gallery kicks-off fall semester with Native American basketry exhibit, Aug. 24-Nov. 1. More than 40 baskets handcrafted by Native Californians, including the world-renowned weavers of the Chumash and Pomo people, tell a remarkable story of cultural continuity and survival despite colonization.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

CNBC: Venture capital confidence dips to two-year low

CNBC: Venture capital confidence dips to two-year low | USF in the News | Scoop.it

There's no tangible evidence that air is coming out of the tech start-up market, but its financiers are nonetheless expressing some concern.

According to a quarterly gauge of investor sentiment, confidence among venture capitalists dropped to a two-year low in the three months ended June. Sky-high valuations continue to be an issue, and economic rifts around the globe are increasingly on investors' minds.

"Uncertainty over the entry of new types of investors, the rising cost of doing business in Silicon Valley and the potential fallout of macro environment issues (e.g., China, E.U.) also gave pause to some venture investors," according to the second-quarter Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index, released on Tuesday. [via @cnbc]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

The Wall Street Journal (blog): The Daily Startup

The Wall Street Journal (blog): The Daily Startup | USF in the News | Scoop.it

A roundup of venture-capital news and analysis from VentureWire and around the Web.

...

Venture Capitalists’ Confidence Index Slips in Second Quarter. A quarterly study by Mark Cannice, a University of San Francisco professor, said the confidence level of Silicon Valley venture capitalists declined for the second quarter in a row, to 3.73, down from 3.81 in the first three months of the year, the WSJ’s Russ Garland reports. That confidence decline comes after investors poured $19.19 billion into U.S.-based startups in the second quarter of this year. [via @WSJ]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Happy Feast Day of St. Ignatius!

Happy Feast Day of St. Ignatius! | USF in the News | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Bloomberg Politics: Many Republican Polls Are Measuring a Unicorn Electorate

Bloomberg Politics: Many Republican Polls Are Measuring a Unicorn Electorate | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Recent elections around the world have not been kind to pollsters. In contests in Israel and Britain, and in a referendum in Scotland, pre-election polls all showed tight races that ended up being, well, not so tight. Although American pollsters have not had to explain errors of such magnitude, there were some danger signs in the last two elections in the United States, with some pollsters doing much better than others. On average, pre-election polls underestimated the magnitude of Obama’s victory in 2012 and of Republican victories in the 2014 midterms. There’s a variety of possible culprits for these discrepancies. One clearly is tied to the challenge in correctly measuring both the size and the composition of the electorate. There’s some evidence that the polls that underestimated Obama’s margin in 2012 erred by underestimating the non-white and Democratic share of the electorate. The problem in 2014, on the other hand, was a kind of mirror image. Many polls erred by counting drop-off voters—individuals who voted in presidential elections, but not in midterms—who happen to be more Democratic.

[via @bpoltics]

...

Ken Goldstein is professor of politics at the University of San Francisco and is Bloomberg Politics' polling and political advertising analyst.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

SinoVision: USF Accepts Gaokao Exam

SinoVision: USF Accepts Gaokao Exam | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In May, the University of San Francisco announced that Chinese students can submit applications directly to the school entrance examination scores. USF joins Illinois Institute of Technology and Brigham Young University, to recognize the Gaokao examination scores. SinoVision reporter Jieyu Yan did this interview with the university President Fr. Paul Fitzgerald, S.J.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

KTVU-TV News: USF Politics Prof James Taylor on Mike Huckabee

KTVU's Ken Pritchett turns to USF Politics Professor James L. Taylor for commentary and analysis on Mike Huckabee's criticism of President Obama's nuclear we...
more...
No comment yet.