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San Francisco Chronicle: San Franciscans ambivalent on future, poll finds

San Francisco Chronicle: San Franciscans ambivalent on future, poll finds | USF in the News | Scoop.it

San Franciscans are pleased with the city's thriving economy, give fairly high marks to the mayor and Board of Supervisors, and believe the city as a whole is headed in the right direction.


Yet the majority say that the city has gotten much more expensive recently and that the tech-fueled economic boom isn't benefiting them or their families. They also say that the government should do more to make sure all types of people can live in San Francisco - but the majority don't trust the mayor or supervisors to accomplish that.


Those are the conflicting findings of a new poll by University of San Francisco researchers provided exclusively to The Chronicle. It shows the tug average city residents feel between happiness that the recession appears to be firmly behind us and concerns that the city is quickly becoming out of reach to wide swaths of people.


"There's anxiety out there," said Corey Cook, a political science professor at USF who conducted the poll with David Latterman, a USF lecturer and political consultant.


"There's a lot of conflict in people's minds," Cook continued. "We're glad the economy is strong, and the city's going in the right direction. At the same time, I'm not sure what this means for me, my family, my neighbors and my neighborhood." [via @sfgate]

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Detroit Free Press: We are family - What ruling means for parents and children in metro Detroit

Detroit Free Press: We are family - What ruling means for parents and children in metro Detroit | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In March 2014, Diane, 48, and Dana Shaw, 47, of Rochester Hills became one of 322 Michigan couples married during the few hours between when a federal judge struck down Michigan's ban on same-sex marriage and when a federal appeals court brought such marriages to an abrupt halt.


On Friday, the U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for same-sex marriages throughout the country. In so doing, it removed a major hurdle to recognizing the Shaws as a family. [via @freep]

...

Kimberly Richman, associate professor of sociology and legal studies at the University of San Francisco and author of "License to Wed: What Legal Marriage Means to Same-Sex Couples," said the court's validation of such marriages adds a legitimacy to the couples as families.


"I also think you can never underscore enough the symbolic value of telling an entire nation that equal is equal," Richman said. "I think we'll see a huge dip, and I think we already have, in homophobic statements, violence against gay men and lesbians. There's a cultural shift that's happening, and this is only one piece of that shift that's happening symbolically."


Richman surveyed 1,400 couples and interviewed about 100 same-sex couples who had been married either in California or in Massachusetts for her book, which was released last year.


Before their marriages were legal, she said: "People felt disenfranchised. People felt their government, their state didn't recognize them as full, civic persons. They felt disrespected, and not like full citizens.

University of San Francisco's insight:
Kimberly Richman received her B.A. at Pitzer College in Claremont, California, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine, where she also completed a Graduate Emphasis in Women's Studies. Her research interests include gender, sexuality, and law; crime, law, and the social construction of "deviance"; family law; legal consciousness; court processes; and reintegrative programming for prison inmates. She is the author of the award winning book Courting Change (NYU Press) and multiple articles and book chapters on the topic of child custody and adoption for gay and lesbian parents, in which she investigates the negotiation of sexual and parental identity in family court, the problematic deployment of rights discourses in the LGBT family law context, and the development of expanded legal definitions of family over time. These articles appear in Law & Society ReviewLaw & Social InquiryStudies in Law, Politics, and Society, Law & Sexuality, and in the edited volume, The New Civil Rights Research. She is also the author of two articles on domestic violence, appearing in Sociological Inquiry and Studies in Law, Politics, and Society, and co-author of a book chapter on anti-gay violence (with Valerie Jenness) in the Handbook of Lesbian and Gay Studies
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Los Angeles Daily News: Convicted killers of women in L.A. County more likely to get death penalty

Los Angeles Daily News: Convicted killers of women in L.A. County more likely to get death penalty | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Chivalry and traditional roles between men and women influence jurors when deciding whether to issue a death sentence, according to a researcher who studies capital murder. 


Steven Shatz, a University of San Francisco law professor, studied 1,000 California murder cases where the defendant was eligible for the death penalty and found that killers of women were seven times more likely to be sentenced to death than those who killed men. The data rang true when Shatz examined 404 similar cases in Los Angeles County between 2003 and 2005.


“It’s pretty hard to get a jury to vote for death. It’s the most awesome act a jury can be asked to do,” Shatz said. “To get them to do it, you really have to evoke sympathy with the victim, and it’s far easier to do that for a woman victim.” [via @ladailynews]


University of San Francisco's insight:

Steven F. Shatz has taught at USF for more than 40 years. During that time, he has been an expert witness and consultant in numerous capital cases and authored several amicus briefs for the U.S. Supreme Court. Shatz has also been a lecturer at UC Berkeley, and a visiting professor at the East China Institute of Politics and Law, in Shanghai, China, and at UC Hastings College of Law. Shatz created, and for twelve years directed, USF’s Keta Taylor Colby Death Penalty Project, whose goal is to involve law students in the interim reform, and ultimate abolition, of the death penalty in the United States. Each summer, the project trains law students in death penalty law and practice and sends them to the South to work as interns with capital defense attorneys. Shatz is the author of casebooks on Criminal Law and Death Penalty Law and numerous journal articles, including his most recent on the racial geography of the death penalty—“Challenging the Death Penalty with Statistics: FurmanMcCleskey, and a Single County Case Study” (Cardozo Law Review, 2013) (with Terry Dalton)—and gender and the death penalty—"Chivalry is not Dead: Murder, Gender, and the Death Penalty" (Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law, and Justice, 2012) (with Naomi Shatz).



Education

  • AB, UC Berkeley
  • JD, Harvard University
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Rev. James Hanvey, S.J., Presents Summer Lecture Series at USF

Rev. James Hanvey, S.J., Presents Summer Lecture Series at USF | USF in the News | Scoop.it
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The Huffington Post: Now More Than Ever, We Must Talk About Slavery's Continuing Legacy in America

The Huffington Post: Now More Than Ever, We Must Talk About Slavery's Continuing Legacy in America | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In the aftermath of the racist murders of nine African Americans in a venerable church in Charleston, South Carolina, Americans are beginning to talk more openly about the issues of race and race relations in our nation. But a common denominator of much of this discussion is the absence of factual historical information about American slavery, the Civil War, the intent of the subsequent Reconstruction era and its demise following the presidential election of 1876 and the Compromise of 1877.



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Outlook India: From Coast to Coast, Americans Observe First Yoga Day

Outlook India: From Coast to Coast, Americans Observe First Yoga Day | USF in the News | Scoop.it

From coast to coast, from a small township in remote North Dakota to the historic National Mall in Washington, thousands of enthusiast Americans came out in large numbers with their mats to perform the ancient Indian spiritual practice, marking the first International Yoga Day.

Reflective of the increasing popularity of Yoga in the US, the organisers in Houston had to increase the capacity of their venue as a large number of health enthusiasts turned up for the celebrations.

For health-conscious Americans, Yoga is now practiced by one in every 10 Americans. The Yoga industry is estimated to be worth USD 27 billion in the United States alone. [via @OutlookIndia]

..

The University of San Francisco Professor, Vamsee Juluri, said though Yoga is Hindu in origin, it is universal in scope like much of Hindu philosophy.

"Doing Yoga doesn't mean anything more than what you want to take out of it--exercise, peace of mind, or right understanding," he said.

"International Yoga day can be the beginning of a greater dialogue between Hindu and other philosophies about how to create a better way of living," he said.

"The exercises are only an aid to clearing our thoughts, actions and lifestyles. There needs to be greater awareness of the many ethical ideals that also accompany yoga - like non-violence, non-greediness and cleanliness. In my view, yoga is a perfect antidote to consumer society!" Juluri said.

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Bloomberg Politics: The Real Math Behind Hillary Clinton's Candidacy

Bloomberg Politics: The Real Math Behind Hillary Clinton's Candidacy | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Elections are fundamentally about math, and the most fundamental of the fundamental factors is demographics—the ethnic and racial composition of the electorate.


So far, Hispanic voters have been getting the most attention from the media and from candidates courting them in announcement speeches and at events like NALEO, which Hillary Clinton addressed on Thursday. While those votes will certainly be important in 2016, blacks remain the crucial minority bloc for Democratic candidates.


As a number of different scholars, consultants, and journalists have demonstrated, the demographic changes we have seen in recent presidential elections and projections of the trend going forward are clear: The sheer number of eligible voters has shifted and continues to shift toward non-white groups, who overwhelmingly favor Democratic candidates. [via @bpolitics]

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Ken Goldstein is professor of politics at the University of San Francisco and is Bloomberg Politics' polling and political advertising analyst.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Ken Goldstein is a professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco and Faculty Director of the USF in DC program. He also teaches in USF's Masters' Program in Public Affairs, which focuses on the skills needed to run a modern political campaign.


Goldstein combines his academic training with an ear for real politics and strategy as well as an impressive set of contacts and extensive professional experience in a variety of media, corporate, and political settings. He served as president of Kantar Media CMAG - a non-partisan Washington DC based political consulting firm that provides media intelligence and is the source of record on political advertising for campaigns, trade associations, and the news media. In 2012, Kantar Media CMAG clients included the Obama and Romney presidential campaigns.

More generally, Goldstein's reputation for unbiased and non-partisan analysis has made him a favorite source for politicians and the news media alike. 

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USA Today: Clinton stands apart from GOP on immigration

USA Today: Clinton stands apart from GOP on immigration | USF in the News | Scoop.it

LAS VEGAS — As the 2016 Republican presidential field toughens its tone on border security and enforcement, Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton has drawn a sharp distinction on immigration by embracing comprehensive reforms such as a pathway to citizenship for undocumented workers already in the United States.
 

Speaking Thursday before the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, Clinton, a former secretary of State, reiterated promises she made during a May 5 roundtable in North Las Vegas. [via @USAToday]

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Bill Hing, a University of San Francisco law professor and immigration policy expert, said that from the standpoint of immigrant rights advocates, Bill Clinton "has one of the worst immigration records" of any president in modern history.
 

Under his administration, the United States started the "big militarization of the border" through Operation Gatekeeper, which was aimed at stopping illegal immigration along the U.S.-Mexico border south of San Diego by deploying more Border Patrol agents, and installing fencing, ground sensors, lights and other technology, Hing said.


However, Hing doubts Bill Clinton's old positions on border security and immigration enforcement will hurt Hillary Clinton with Latinos.


"Latino voters are giving her a pass because the Republicans have been so intransigent on immigration reform," Hing said, pointing out that in recent years conservative Republicans have consistently foiled attempts by moderate Republicans and Democrats to pass immigration reform.

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KPCW: Cool Science Radio - June 11, 2015

KPCW: Cool Science Radio - June 11, 2015 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

....Max Planck is credited with being the father of quantum theory, and his work was described by his close friend Albert Einstein as "the basis of all twentieth-century physics."  We speak With Brandon Brown, biographer and author of the new book, Plank: Driven by Vision, Broken by War. (click on title to listen) [via @KPCWRadio]


University of San Francisco's insight:

Brandon Brown pursued doctoral training in superconductivity and low-temperature physics, with postdoctoral work in science communication. Once at the University of San Francisco, he shifted his research focus to sensory biophysics. His laboratory, his research students, and various collaborators have explored the electric and magnetic sensory abilities of a variety of creatures. Currently, he is completing a book about the life and work of German physicist Max Planck (1858-1947), to be published by Oxford University Press in 2015.  See his author page for more information.

From 2004-2008, Brandon served as Associate Dean for Sciences, and during this time the University completed planning stages for the new Center for Science and Innovation. Today, when not teaching or conducting research, he continues to spread the word about this project to alumni and other groups in his role as Director of External Affairs for the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Catholic San Francisco: 2015 Lane Center Summer Scholar

Catholic San Francisco: 2015 Lane Center Summer Scholar | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In a three-part lecture series at the University of San Francisco, Jesuit Father James Hanvey, former Lo Schiavo Chair at the Joan and Ralph Lane Center for Catholic Studies and Social Thought, will address theological questions related to the meaning and mission of the Catholic Church in today’s world.

Wednesday, July 8, 5-6:30 p.m.: “The Church and Contemporary Society: Setting the Secular Free”;

Wednesday, July 15, 5-6:30 p.m.: “Mercy as an Agent of Social Change: The Mission of the Church under Francis”;

Wednesday, July 22, 5-6:30 p.m.: “Living the Resurrection: Future Hope or Present Task?”

The free lectures will be held at Lone Mountain 100, Handlery Room, on the USF campus. 

University of San Francisco's insight:

James Hanvey specializes in systematic theology and Catholic Social Thought and Ignatian Spirituality. He received his doctorate from Oxford University on the Hegelian metaphysics of Trinitarian Theology and has taught systematic theology at Heythrop College, University of London. He was head of the Theology Department at Heythrop until he founded and was director of the Heythrop Institute for Religion, Ethics and Society in 2004. When he finished as director he was seconded to work as the theological consultant to the Catholic Bishops Conference of England and Wales. Although his main field is systematics, he has also held the Veale Chair in Ignatian Spirituality, The Milltown Institute, Dublin and he has also lectured and written on education, health care, and the Church's response to contemporary culture. He co-authored and influential report commissioned by the Catholic Education Service (England and Wales) entitled, 'On the Way to Life' which explored the challenges for Catholic Education in secular post-modern culture. He is currently working on a new book: The Theological Foundations of Catholic Social Teaching - The Witness of the Spirit as well as preparing a collection of papers on the theology of health care and contributory papers to various forthcoming publications: a legal collection on Human Dignity and papers on the anniversary of Vatican II.

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America Magazine: Jesuit Law Schools Seek Justice for Refugees and Vulnerable Migrants

America Magazine: Jesuit Law Schools Seek Justice for Refugees and Vulnerable Migrants | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Jesuit Refugee Service/USA and 13 Jesuit law schools have been working in collaboration to address the recent surge in migrations from Central America to the United States. On Tuesday, June 16 the coalition announced the release of “A Fair Chance to Due Process: Challenges in Legal Protection for Central American Asylum Seekers and Other Vulnerable Migrants.” The document, published in recognition of World Refugee Day (June 20), details challenges in Central America, what Jesuit law schools are doing to assist those seeking asylum in the United States and offers recommendations to improve migrant services.  [via @americamag]

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The thirteen Jesuit law schools taking part in the project are Boston College, Creighton University, Fordham University, Georgetown University, Gonzaga University, Loyola University Chicago and its Center for the Human Rights of Children, Loyola in Los Angeles, Loyola University New Orleans, Saint Louis University and its Catholic Legal Assistance Ministry, Santa Clara University, Seattle University, University of Detroit Mercy and the University of San Francisco. 


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Climate-Change & Encyclical Experts at USF

Climate-Change & Encyclical Experts at USF | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Vatican is expected to release Pope Francis’ highly anticipated encyclical on the environment tomorrow, June 18. The 192-page document is Pope Francis’ first encyclical, or major teaching letter, on climate change and its effects on the planet’s poor. Leading up to the June 18 release, the pope said the document was addressed to all people, regardless of religion.


The University of San Francisco (USF) is the city’s first university, and its Jesuit Catholic mission helps ignite a passion for social justice issues, including sustainability and environmental responsibility.


USF has a number of academic experts on campus prepared to discuss the encyclical and its various angles.


Please see available scholars here: https://www.usfca.edu/templates/ocm_media_relations.aspx?id=6442509567

University of San Francisco's insight:

Contact Anne-Marie Devine Tasto at 415.422.2697 or abdevine@usfca.edu to set up interview time. 

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94.1 KPFA: UpFront with Guest Host Vylma V - June 15, 2015

94.1 KPFA: UpFront with Guest Host Vylma V - June 15, 2015 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

An hour-long news magazine with a strong focus on state and local issues. Hosted by Brian Edwards-Tiekert and produced by the KPFA News Department. [via @kpfa]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Professor Larry Brewster is an educator, author and professional consultant with areas of specialization that include public policy, organizational systems and development, social psychology, management theories and practice. Dr. Brewster is the co-author of A Primer of California Politics and The Public Agenda: Issues in American Politics.


As the former Director of Market Research for a leading international data and telecommunications company, Professor Brewster draws from his work as a management executive, as well as his research on local, state, and national politics to help students develop a more rigorous and comprehensive approach to the study of management and systems within organizations.

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State of California: Governor Brown Announces Appointments

State of California: Governor Brown Announces Appointments | USF in the News | Scoop.it

SACRAMENTO - Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today announced the following appointments.

 

Tim Iglesias, 59, of Oakland, has been appointed to the California Fair Employment and Housing Council. Iglesias has been a professor of law at the University of San Francisco School of Law since 2003. He was an assistant professor of law at Wayne State University Law School from 2002 to 2003 and deputy director at the Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California from 1998 to 2001, where he was a project coordinator from 1995 to 1998. Iglesias was a Pillsbury Madison and Sutro public service fellow at HomeBase from 1994 to 1995 and served as a law clerk for the Honorable Stanley A. Weigel at the U.S. District Court, Northern District of California from 1993 to 1994. Iglesias was a summer associate at Goldfarb and Lipman LLP in 1992, a legal assistant at the University of San Francisco Office of University Counsel from 1989 to 1990, a tax coordinator at Lignum-2 Inc. from 1988 to 1989 and a Jesuit seminarian for the California Province of the Society of Jesus from 1975 to 1988. He is a member of the Association for Law, Property and Society and the American Bar Association. Iglesias earned a Juris Doctor degree from Stanford Law School. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Iglesias is a Democrat. [via @CAgovernment]

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KGO-AM Radio: James Taylor on President Obama and the 'N' Word

University of San Francisco's insight:

James Lance Taylor is author of the book Black Nationalism in the United States: From Malcolm X to Barack Obama, which earned 2011 "Outstanding Academic Title" -Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries (January 2012). (Ranked top 3 percent of 25,000 books submitted and top 8 percent of 7,300 actually accepted for review by the American Library Association).


He is the Immediate Past President of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS), an important organization of African American, African, and Afro Caribbean political scientists in the United States.


He is associate professor and Chair of the Department of Politics at the University of San Francisco. His undergraduate degree is from Pepperdine University and his graduate degrees were earned at the University of Southern California (USC). He has taught previously as a Visiting Associate Professor of political science at Saint Louis University in Madrid, Spain and political science and African American Studies at University of California, Berkeley.

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Bloomberg: The One Thing Bernie-mentum Can't Overcome - Demographics

Bloomberg: The One Thing Bernie-mentum Can't Overcome - Demographics | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Could Bernie Sanders really be the nominee? Recently, some on the left have dared to hope. Reports of large, fervent crowds and growing poll results from some early states fueled significant media discussion of a surge for Sanders as he challenges quasi-incumbent Hillary Clinton for the Democratic presidential nomination.
 

Our own Bloomberg Politics poll showed that while Clinton retained strong leads in both New Hampshire and Iowa, Sanders’ support was increasing and assessments of Clinton softened a bit. A CNN New Hampshire poll out a day later showed a much closer race and highlighted Clinton’s “dwindling” lead. While you may want to take it with a grain of salt because he is a Republican, well-respected pollster Glen Bolger flat out predicted that Sanders would beat Clinton in both Iowa and New Hampshire. [via @bpolitics]

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Ken Goldstein is professor of politics at the University of San Francisco and is Bloomberg Politics' polling and political advertising analyst.

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BusinessInsider: San Francisco's 'tech mayor' is facing a cakewalk re-election -- even though the city is at war with itself

BusinessInsider: San Francisco's 'tech mayor' is facing a cakewalk re-election  --  even though the city is at war with itself | USF in the News | Scoop.it

San Francisco is a city where great economic prosperity, driven in large part by the tech industry, has lowered the unemployment rate to 3.5 per cent and created a budget surplus.


That same prosperity, though, has created friction in the city by the bay.


San Francisco has the second highest income inequality in the nation — mainly because its rich are really rich, according to the Brookings Institute.


The rent is now the highest in the country. The artists, writers and schoolteachers that gave the city its flavour are being priced out by cafes offering $US4 slices of toast and housing developers who are getting rich off the city’s economic boom.


This is San Francisco in 2015, and its mayor is Ed Lee.

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University of San Francisco political science professor Corey Cook pointed to Lee’s interplay between tech and politics as how he plays the game, and he’s playing it well. His use of behested payments and talking to the tech companies when he needs some support is just one example.


“It’s clear that the industry is influential. I think he thinks that the future of San Francisco is going to be grown by the tech sector,” Cook said. “They have shown the capacity to become engaged philanthropically. I think from his own statements that he’s argued that tech is part of the solution.”


When the tech bus issue flared up, the city acted and instituted the pilot program to allow the companies to pay for using public bus stops. That protest movement is all but dead now

[via @BusInsiderAU]

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Chicago Tribune: Summer campers now code

Chicago Tribune: Summer campers now code | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Eight-year-old Claire Dormanen assumed her role as a summer camper this month in many traditional ways: She wore a comfy T-shirt and shorts, scarfed down a sack lunch and ran frantically to escape elimination during a game of dodgeball.


But Claire also added a new activity to her regular camp schedule this year: computer coding. For three hours on a recent Friday, campers built creatures out of Legos and then wrote computer programs to make them move.


"This is where the world is going," said Claire's mother, Audrey Dormanen, of Oak Park, who enrolled her daughter in the full day sports/coding combination camp at Code Play Learn, an Oak Park business. "It's embracing technology and embracing what's going to be core to your life." [via @chicagotribune]

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"For me, the idea of having kids coding at 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 years old is just absurd," said Jim Taylor, an adjunct professor of psychology at the University of San Francisco and author of "Raising Generation Tech: Preparing Your Children for a Media-Fueled World." "Time spent coding is time not spent playing, which is far more important for creativity, social interaction, and development of motor and social skills."

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Taylor has worked with professional, world-class, junior, and age-group athletes in many sports for over 20 years. A former alpine ski racer who held a top-20 national ranking and competed internationally, Jim is a 2nd degree black belt and certified instructor in karate, a certified tennis coach, a marathon runner, and an Ironman triathlete. Jim is the author of eight books, has published over 400 articles in popular and professional publications, and has given more than 500 workshops and presentations throughout the North America and Europe.

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Examiner: No race left behind for Hillary Clinton in wake of Charleston shootings

Examiner: No race left behind for Hillary Clinton in wake of Charleston shootings | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Adam Lanza was a kid left behind. His earliest school records from his primary days at Sandy Hook Elementary show a record that his chief complaint was that nobody had time for him. James Holmes was a kid left behind. Nobody, but his shrink who was getting paid, seemed to have any time for him either. It is now all on record at his death penalty trial. After each of these tragedies, that combined left 40 American families in grief, the politicking began. Get the crazies and the guns off the streets and as far away from us as possible, and this problem all goes away. In the wake of the shootings in Charleston, South Carolina, that left 9 more Americans dead this week, the tables turned. An entire race was left behind when Dylan Roof opened fire on Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, and the politicking has begun. It’s the usual suspects saying the usual things, but this time with a side of racism. The New York Times reported June 20 that this weekend Hillary Clinton offered her “boldest remarks yet” on the topics of gun violence, to a country wracked with racism. And, according to numbers crunched by Bloomberg Politics on June 22, it may be just what Hillary needs to lock this election. [via @examinercom]

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Ken Goldstein, a University of San Francisco politics professor and polling analyst for Bloomberg Politics reported today that winning an election is all about having the numbers in your favor. He also reported that so far, that’s a good thing for Hillary. Minority groups in America “overwhelmingly favor” the Democratic camp, and not just because of Obama.


In fact historically, minorities have leaned the Democratic way. In the last election, Goldstein writes that the 5 million vote lead that locked Obama’s second term was largely the minority vote. He led the way in the African American vote, in many of the southern states and some key battleground states.


Goldstein also reported that when it comes to minorities, the “demographic math” for the GOP is problematic. Capturing the Hispanic vote continues to be a significant challenge for the GOP. Goldstein also reported that the Democrats don’t even need to replicate last election season’s results with minorities to win this election.

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Sync Magazine: Interview - Opinder Bawa of the University of San Francisco

Sync Magazine: Interview - Opinder Bawa of the University of San Francisco | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In his role as CIO at the University of San Francisco, Opinder Bawa is continually asking, what do you teach the next generation of technology leaders?


Opinder Bawa does not distinguish between his roles as an executive and an educator.


As the University of San Francisco’s (USF) vice president and CIO, he places equal importance on finding innovative solutions and sharing them with the university and students. His comfort with multiple roles stems from his childhood—during which his father’s diplomatic responsibilities from India took his family to a new country every few years—and from his appreciation of the Jesuit tradition, which has long sought to build a more humane and just world. USF’s 10,000 graduate and undergraduate students learn from a diverse array of faculty who, like Bawa, bring real-world experience from industries ranging from technology to the nonprofit sector. Sync spoke to Bawa about the transformation of higher education.

[Read the full story via @SyncTechLeaders]



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Los Angeles Times: 'How did we let this happen?' The Amy Winehouse question and social science's take on modern fame

Los Angeles Times: 'How did we let this happen?' The Amy Winehouse question and social science's take on modern fame | USF in the News | Scoop.it

There's lots of blame to throw around when it comes to the early demise of Amy Winehouse. 


From drug abuse and alcoholism to eating disorders and bad relationships, there's a clear trail of breadcrumbs leading to the singer's death in 2011. Since her passing, everything that ever happened to Winehouse, both at the time and in retrospect, has been examined: Her complicated childhood and overbearing father. Her toxic relationship with husband Blake Fielder-Civil. Label deals that asked too much. Promoters who booked her before she was ready. [via @latimes]

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"There's no boundaries to who can weigh in on what you've done and what you are doing," says Joshua Gamson, a sociologist at the University of San Francisco and author of "Claims to Fame: Celebrity in Contemporary America." "Your story is a commodity, so people are actually competing for the profit from that commodity ... [Celebrities] try to stay in control of their story — that's why they hire publicists, why they hide out — but that's part of the deal with celebrity. It's what keeps you successful."


"On a much smaller scale, we're [all] increasingly, consciously performing for others — we're massaging our stories on social media to project a self," Gamson explains. He says he's given interviews like this one, about our fascination with these narratives, multiple times per year since "Claims to Fame" was published in 1994. "So we project that [anxiety] onto the people who are living it full time.


"I don't know if it's a relief, but it is a reminder that even all the resources and status [of celebrity] do not protect you from not being able to trust people, from being able to tell the difference between your image and yourself."


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E-Campus News: Catching campus rapists via an online reporting tool

E-Campus News: Catching campus rapists via an online reporting tool | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Colleges have been heavily criticized in recent years for the high frequency of sexual assaults on campus—and for their failure to support victims adequately and punish attackers. Now, the University of San Francisco is hoping that a new web-based reporting tool will help victims of sexual assault take back control of their lives, file charges if they choose—and identify serial attackers.
 

The new tool, known as Callisto, is the product of Sexual Health Innovations, a nonprofit organization that first unveiled the concept during a “data jam” held by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault in 2014. USF will be the first college to implement the new tool when it launches a pilot this August. [via @ecampusnews]

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“The decision to report a sexual assault by talking to campus police or local police—or even someone in a university office—can be a daunting process,” says Peter Novak, vice provost for student life at USF. “If we can make that process available to students in the privacy of their own room to learn about that process more effectively, then we think it will provide many more options for students.”


“We want them to know that we can help them academically and personally, so that they can maintain their work in the classroom and can feel safe while they’re here,” said Novak, noting that victims might have difficulty concentrating in class, for example, or want to create a no-contact order against the alleged perpetrator. “These are the same things we discuss when we meet in person with a victim, but the online environment gives them more time to reflect on their own desires and wants.”

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KQED: California Supreme Court Upholds San Jose’s Affordable Housing Rules

KQED: California Supreme Court Upholds San Jose’s Affordable Housing Rules | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The California Supreme Court has sided with the city of San Jose in a case that could affect affordable housing rules all over the state.

The League of California Cities and California State Association of Counties estimate more than 170 municipalities have some kind of ordinance on the books to tackle the fact that real estate, especially in coastal markets, has become increasingly unaffordable for many renters and would-be homeowners. Both groups backed San Jose in the case. [via @KQED @KQEDNews]

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University of San Francisco law professor Tim Iglesias organized and co-wrote an amicus brief for the city of San Jose. “Most inclusionary ordinances give developers a number of different ways to comply with the requirement. So what the opponents have done is to seize on those alternative options and say, ‘Hey look: This is an exaction,’ which is kind of a term of art in law that makes the city have to justify that requirement in a different, stricter way.”

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National Catholic Reporter: Asylum-seekers from Central America aren't receiving adequate legal counsel

National Catholic Reporter: Asylum-seekers from Central America aren't receiving adequate legal counsel | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Women and children asylum-seekers from Central America are not getting adequate legal counsel when entering the United States, according to a report released Tuesday by the Jesuit Refugee Service/USA in partnership with law schools around the country. As a result, migrants with no representation are more likely to lose their asylum claims than those who do get legal counsel.
 

The report, "A Fair Chance for Due Process: Challenges in Legal Protection for Central American Asylum Seekers and Other Vulnerable Migrants," outlined results from a survey done at 13 Jesuit law schools. The findings highlighted the efforts and challenges legal representatives face in providing services to this migrant population. Among the issues cited were high case loads that resulted from clients in expedited removal dockets; lack of access to clients before they were deported; denial of asylum based on gang-related violence; and lack of access to counseling and support services. [via @ncronline]

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Law professor Bill Hing of the University of San Francisco, one of the schools that participated in the survey, said part of the problem was the expedited removal process that the Obama administration implemented when asylum-seekers arrived in record numbers in 2014.


"Once the administration did that, it created chaos all over the country among service providers," Hing said. About 100 new cases a day were added to the expedited calendars that he and others dubbed "rocket dockets."


Since the courts operated swiftly to deport, Hing said, many clients were denied their court hearings because immigration officials kept "losing applications and notices of appearances" filed by lawyers. One woman was about to be deported when a pro bono attorney filed an emergency stay. "They took the woman off the airplane," Hing said. "People have been deported who haven't had their full day in court."


"Even in a part of the country like San Francisco where there are many nonprofits and very good pro bono attorneys, the need could not be met," said Hing, who along with his team of law students and a full-time attorney are now handling 55 open immigration cases.

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ABC 7 News: California Supreme Court rules for city in affordable housing fight

ABC 7 News: California Supreme Court rules for city in affordable housing fight | USF in the News | Scoop.it
SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The California Supreme Court ruled Monday morning that cities and counties can require developers to provide affordable housing. The unanimous decision comes five years after San Jose passed an ordinance on affordable housing that was challenged by developers. ABC7 News took a look at what impact this ruling will have in the Bay Area.


It is very specific to new units that will be up for sale, not for rent. Monday's ruling makes it easier for any city in California with a housing crisis to force developers to build more affordable housing. [via @abc7newsBayArea]

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"And so now that the Supreme Court has spoken so clearly, in favor of inclusionary housing, it's likely that affordable housing people will now follow up and try to get the Palmer decision overruled," Tim Iglesias from the University of San Francisco School of Law said.

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WLRN Public Media: Will The 2016 Presidential Election Boost Florida's Economy?

WLRN Public Media: Will The 2016 Presidential Election Boost Florida's Economy? | USF in the News | Scoop.it

It's likely not news to you that Miami is ground zero for two of the most watched Republicans in this cycle's presidential contest. Remember the excitement back in April when Senator Marco Rubio officially hopped in the race at the Freedom Tower?


“Grounded by the lessons of our history, but inspired by the promise of our future, I announce my candidacy for President of the United States,” Rubio said.


And Monday we get the long-awaited announcement from former Governor Jeb Bush at Miami Dade College in Kendall. Florida’s senior Senator Bill Nelson is a Democrat, but he's glad those two Republicans are garnering so much attention for the state. Politics aside, he says having two candidates from the state is a win win.


The benefits may not stop there. South Florida Republican Congressman Carlos Curbelo is predicting it will have a positive impact on the economy. [via @WLRN]

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But as Rubio and Bush crisscross the U.S. they're likely to describe Florida's gorgeous beaches and national parks, right? So maybe people will book a ticket to the Sunshine State. Not gonna happen, according to political professor Ken Goldstein of the University of San Francisco.
 

“I see zero impact on tourism. Zero. Zero impact. Right? I mean, it’s not like hundreds of thousands of campaign workers are going to be flowing into Florida for the Florida primary,” says Goldstein.


And again, if the GOP race is really tight by the time Florida voters get to weigh in, Goldstein says it still isn't going to make local business owners rich.
 


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