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KCBS Radio News: Lack of Diversity in Tech Industry

KCBS Radio News: Lack of Diversity in Tech Industry | USF in the News | Scoop.it

KCBS Radio reports on the Rev. Jesse Jackson's visit to the Hewlett Packard annual shareholders meeting to bring attention to Silicon Valley's poor record of including blacks and Latinos in hiring, board appointments and startup funding.


USF's Vice Provost Mary Wardell-Ghiraraduzzi spoke with KCBS Radio News about Jackson's strategy and why people of color need to be part of the booming tech industry.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Mary J. Wardell-Ghirarduzzi has been working in various roles in higher education administration for the past 18 years and is currently part of leadership at the University of San Francisco. Working with faculty, staff and students, and diverse communities through the San Francisco Bay area, she promotes an understanding of diversity as core to a holistic and sustainable higher education organization. 

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Marketplace: Lending Club goes public

Marketplace: Lending Club goes public | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Lending Club—the leading online-lending-marketplace, based in San Francisco—goes public on Thursday. The IPO will be the first among several fast-growing financial startups expected to go public in the peer-to-peer (P2P) lending industry.


UPDATE: Lending Club's IPO priced at $15/share, raising about $870 million and valuing the company around $5.4 billion.

Lending Club matches individuals and businesses that want to borrow with lenders—mostly hedge funds, wealth managers and institutional investors. Borrowers pay interest rates ranging from 7.6 percent to 24.9 percent, based on their credit-worthiness, according to Lending Club’s website. Lenders on the site, meanwhile, can realize attractive net returns, in the 7 percent to 9 percent range.

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USF School of Management Professor Mark Cannice comments on firms like Lending Club that can either disrupt or even begin new industries. [via @marketplace]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Mark V. Cannice, Ph.D. is an internationally recognized scholar, teacher, and speaker on entrepreneurship and venture capital. He is Department Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation with the University of San Francisco School of Management.

Dr. Cannice writes the widely-followed quarterly Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index Report® which is published by ProQuest and EBSCO, carried globally on Bloomberg Professional Services in 125 countries (Bloomberg ticker symbol: SVVCCI), and has been referenced in the Economist, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Xinhua News Service, Der Speigel, CNBC, National Public Radio, and many other media. He has written similar quarterly reports on the Chinese venture capital industry, China Venture Capitalist Confidence Index Report™ (Bloomberg ticker symbol: CVCCI).

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KTVU News: USF Professor Rebecca Gordon Explains Why Torture is Ineffective

KTVU-TV News turned to University of San Francisco (USF) Professor Rebecca Gordon for her insights on the implications of the CIA report. "We remain a countr...
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KTVU News: USF Professor Rebecca Gordon on CIA Report

KTVU-TV News turned to University of San Francisco (USF) Professor Rebecca Gordon for her insights on the implications of the CIA report.


Rebecca Gordon received her M.Div. and Ph.D. from Graduate Theological Union. Her dissertation in the field of Ethics and Social Theory focuses on the United States' use of torture in the post-9/11 period. Other interests include political philosophy, theories of justice including questions of race and gender justice, and their application in the world.

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USF Professor Saves Family From Flooding Home

USF Professor Saves Family From Flooding Home | USF in the News | Scoop.it

“It was pretty crazy situation,” said [Gretchen] Coffman, assistant professor of environmental science, who had been spending the holiday weekend at her sister-in-law’s house next door. She said her experience wading through moving water as a wetland restoration expert and as an open ocean swimmer in the San Francisco Bay came in handy.


Full story: http://bit.ly/12DeLyD


[via USFCA]


Via University of San Francisco
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KNTV News: USF Professor Tony Ribera on KNTV News

USF Assistant Professor Anthony Ribera speaks with KNTV's Jean Ellie about police tactics during protests. 


Ribera brings a wealth of experience at the center of San Francisco civic life to both his teaching and academic work. As former Police Chief of San Francisco, Professor Ribera believes effective leaders are ethical leaders, underscoring the core values of the Jesuit tradition, promoting conscientious action for social justice. Dr. Ribera currently teaches the Law Enforcement Leadership program and has since 1997 when he wrote the original curriculum. In 2001, USF formed the International Institute of Criminal Justice Leadership and appointed Professor Ribera as its director. The Institute's annual symposium has emerged as a groundbreaking forum for progressive law enforcement training and leadership. [via @nbcbayarea]

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The New York Times: U.A.B.’s Decision to Eliminate Football Is One Others Have Faced

The New York Times: U.A.B.’s Decision to Eliminate Football Is One Others Have Faced | USF in the News | Scoop.it

When news filtered out that the football program might be taken from a university in the heart of a football-mad Southern state, a short distance from one of the jewels of the Southeastern Conference, alumni and athletic supporters sprang to attention.

They banded together their resources and fund-raising capabilities, arguing that a healthy college campus needed to have a football team to root for. The board of trustees, after months of discussion, decided not to disappoint the opposition. And so Tulane kept its football team.

This was in 2003, more than a decade before the bombshell announcement last week that Alabama-Birmingham, once one of Tulane’s rivals in Conference USA, would become the first university in college athletics’ top tier in 20 years to terminate its football program. The U.A.B. program officially shut down Sunday when the 6-6 Blazers failed to receive a bowl bid.

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Dan Rascher, a sports economics professor at the University of San Francisco, said colleges often underestimated the positive impact of athletics, both in the way they account for athletic spending and the other financial benefits teams provide.

“Football affects admissions, enrollment and donations,” he said. “It’s hard for schools to wrap their arms around things like this because they don’t necessarily see them on the athletic department’s budget sheet. A few years down the road, U.A.B. could wonder why it’s not as attractive to students.”

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Rascher is Professor and Director of Academic Programs for the Sport Management Program at the University of San Francisco, where he has taught sports economics and finance, business research methods, and master's project. As President of SportsEconomics, his clients have included organizations involved in the NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, MLS, PGA, NCAA, AHL, sports media, minor league baseball, Formula One racing, CART, Premier League Football, local sports commissions, and various government agencies.

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Davis Enterprise: Wydick's novel exposes global coffee trade issues

Davis Enterprise: Wydick's novel exposes global coffee trade issues | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Economist and author Bruce Wydick will be at The Avid Reader, 617 Second St. in Davis, at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 6, to discuss his new book, “The Taste of Many Mountains.”
 

Based on an actual research project on fair trade coffee funded by USAID, “The Taste of Many Mountains” is a novel about the global economy in which Wydick, a University of San Francisco economist, examines the realities of the coffee trade from the perspective of young researchers struggling to understand the chasm between the world’s rich and poor.


Wydick has taught at USF since 1996, after completing his Ph.D. at UC Berkeley. His research focuses on applications of game theory as well as empirical and experimental methods to poverty and development issues, especially to microfinance.
 

He published more than a dozen articles in academic journals such as the Journal of Development Economics, Economic Development and Cultural Change, World Development and the Economic Journal, and has received grants and awards for his research from USAID, the Jesuit Foundation, the McCarthy Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trust.
 

He is co director of the master’s program in international and development economics at USF, has served as a consultant on a number of research projects of the World Bank, and is actively involved in both field research and development work in the highlands of western Guatemala. [via @D_Enterprise]



University of San Francisco's insight:

Areas of research specialization are in the use of econometric, experimental, and game-theoretic tools to analyze the impact of development programs, especially in the areas of microfinance, education, and health. Professor Wydick's recent work examines the impact of development programs including microfinance, child sponsorship, and animal donation programs. Other recent work studies the role of hope and aspirations in escaping poverty traps. 

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How and why buyers from China are snatching up Bay Area homes

How and why buyers from China are snatching up Bay Area homes | USF in the News | Scoop.it

When Linda Vida sold her house in the Oakland hills this summer, she was hoping for a buyer who would live there, put kids in the local schools and “give back or participate in the community,” she says.


However, “as is very typical these days, a woman from China paid all cash for the house, and is not going to live in it but is going to rent it out for a while,” said Vida, who moved to Colorado. The buyer, a professor in Shanghai, paid $1.022 million, $27,000 over the asking price, for the home on Bay Forest Drive.

Although the Bay Area has always attracted foreign home buyers, anecdotal evidence suggests that their numbers are growing, creating even more competition in areas where demand has far outstripped the supply of new homes. The boom is partly because of globalization, but mostly a result of the tremendous buildup of wealth in developing countries, especially China, which had 2.4 million millionaires in 2013, up 60 percent from the year before, according to the Boston Consulting Group. [via @sfchronicle]

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Stanley Kwong, an adjunct professor of international business at the University of San Francisco who lives in Sea Cliff, said almost half the buyers in his neighborhood are “tech guys in hoodies” and close to the other half are from Asia. Many are former factory owners in China who are now buying old auto-parts factories in Detroit or pork farms in Iowa. But they don’t want to live in Detroit or Iowa, so they buy a house in San Francisco. Or they might be setting up a firm to invest in U.S. real estate, “and part of that investment is $6 million for a house,” he said.


 

University of San Francisco's insight:

Stanley Kwong brings to USF over 30 years of international management, marketing and teaching experience in the US, China, India, and Central Europe. Professor Kwong is recognized as a leading expert on marketing strategy, branding, and investments policies and is frequently interviewed on branding in China and Chinese investments in the U.S. by top media, such as the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, SingTao News, and Chinese World Journal. He is a highly desired guest speaker at industry conferences and universities worldwide.

As a former Worldwide Program Director for IBM Developers Marketing, Professor Kwong shares his multifaceted experience-based knowledge of outsourcing and offshoring, globalization trends, marketing management and international business with his undergraduate, MBA and MBAE students.

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MSNBC: Will there be legal challenges to Obama’s immigration plan?

MSNBC: Will there be legal challenges to Obama’s immigration plan? | USF in the News | Scoop.it

VIDEO: DRM Action Coalition co-director Erika Andiola shares her reaction to President Obama’s immigration announcement, and attorneys Alma Rosa Nieto and Bill Ong Hing discuss the legal realities behind the president’s plan (4:10). [via @msnbc]


University of San Francisco's insight:

Throughout his career, USF Professor Bill Ong Hing pursued social justice through a combination of community work, litigation, and scholarship. He is the author of numerous academic and practice-oriented publications on immigration policy and race relations, including Ethical Borders—NAFTA, Globalization, and Mexican Migration(Temple University Press, 2010), Deporting Our Souls-Morality, Values, and Immigration Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2006), Defining America Through Immigration Policy (Temple University Press, 2004), and Making and Remaking Asian America Through Immigration Policy (Stanford University Press, 1993).

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Sacramento Bee: Benicia mayor's public skepticism puts vote on oil trains in jeopardy

Sacramento Bee: Benicia mayor's public skepticism puts vote on oil trains in jeopardy | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The hot national debate over crude oil train safety has taken an unusual twist in the Bay Area city of Benicia , where a blunt-talking mayor's right to free speech is being pitted against an oil company's right to a fair public hearing.

This summer, amid tense public debate over a Valero Refining Co. proposal to bring crude oil on trains to its Benicia plant, Mayor Elizabeth Patterson revealed that the city attorney had privately advised her that her frequent public comments about oil transport safety could be seen as bias against the Valero project.

The mayor said the city attorney advised her to stop talking about the oil trains and sending out mass emails containing articles and other information, and to recuse herself from voting when it came before the council. [via @sacbee_news]

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JoAnne Speers is a former general counsel to the League of California Cities who now teaches leadership ethics at the School of Management at the University of San Francisco . She said case law on the matter can trip up cities and elected officials.
 

"I feel for the mayor and elected officials generally," she said. "It seems paradoxical with issues of great importance to their community, if they want to participate in the decision, they are subject to certain constraints."

University of San Francisco's insight:

JoAnne teaches Legal Issues Affecting Nonprofit Organizations, in addition to courses in USF's Public Administration program. She brings over 25 years of nonprofit and public administration experience to her teaching, having served as general counsel to the League of California Cities and chief executive of the Institute for Local Government. In addition to the nonprofit sector, she has worked for the California Legislature and the federal courts.

Over the course of her career, JoAnne has written extensively on legal, ethics and management topics.

Her publications include the definitive guide for local officials and their counsel on public service ethics laws, Understanding the Basics of Public Service Ethics. She also had a bi-monthly column on public service ethics issues while at the Institute for Local Government. She is also interested in inter-sectoral collaboration, which is why she wrote, "Pondering Public/Nonprofit Collaborations: What a Form 990 Says about a Nonprofit.”

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San Francisco Magazine: The Happiest Warrior

San Francisco Magazine: The Happiest Warrior | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Sitting in his office in the State Building in San Francisco's Civic Center, Tom Ammiano can't stop playing with his wedding ring. The three-term state assemblyman, 14-year San Francisco supervisor, and two-time mayoral candidate is absentmindedly rotating the gold band up and down his ring finger. "I like it," he says a little bashfully, more the blushing groom than the grizzled political bulldog. "I'm nervous about it. I don't want to lose it. I like it very much."
 

Ammiano's sweetness about the ring is completely warranted: He swore his vows just a week ago, at the age of 72. In a surprise move—practically an in-town elopement—he married his longtime partner, Carolis Deal, in front of dozens of unsuspecting friends and supporters at what was ostensibly a welcome-home party. [via @sanfranmag]

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Ammiano became a Sacramento success story: He was a legislative workhorse, passing 58 bills during his six years, notching a string of policy successes, and rising to the chair of the Committee on Public Safety. (Perhaps most impressive, he did it all despite barely raising any money. Of the 10 Democrats who entered the assembly in 2008 and stayed for the full six years, Ammiano was ninth in fundraising.) As Corey Cook, political science professor at the University of San Francisco, puts it, “He went in to make a difference, and by just about every objective measure, he has.”


Cook points out, it’s not just his wins that were meaningful—his losses were too.


“Folks don’t give him enough credit,” says Cook. “He’s shown that you can be principled and at the same time be willing to compromise and take another shot the following year.” 

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San Francisco Chronicle: Obama poised to issue immigration reprieve for millions

San Francisco Chronicle: Obama poised to issue immigration reprieve for millions | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Blaming Congress for inaction on immigration reform, President Obama will unveil a long-expected executive order Thursday that could shield millions of undocumented immigrants from deportation, igniting a showdown with congressional Republicans who call it an illegal amnesty.

Republican reaction was fast and furious, with some members of Congress saying they will try to deny the president the funding he would need to implement the plan.


Immigration advocates and lawmakers who have worked with the administration said the president’s use of executive authority would shield about 3.7 million people from deportation, allowing them to work legally in the U.S. until Congress acts on broader immigration reform legislation.

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The immigrants whom Obama’s order is expected to help include parents and possibly other family members of children who are U.S. citizens by birth or otherwise have permanent legal status.


University of San Francisco law Professor Bill Ong Hing, who has argued that opening the U.S-Mexican border and improving conditions in Mexico would cut the flow of illegal immigrants, said Obama’s order will help “hard-working contributors with strong family ties and no serious criminal history.”


California is home to “about one-third of all those who are eligible” under Obama’s proposals, and will undoubtedly be the state where they have the greatest impact, he said. [via @sfchronicle]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Professor Bill Ong Hing has been pursuing social justice through a combination of community work, litigation, and scholarship. He has authored numerous academic and practice-oriented publications on immigration policy and race relations, and was co-counsel in the precedent-setting U.S. Supreme Court asylum case, INS v. Cardoza-Fonseca (1987). Hing is the founder of the Immigrant Legal Resource Center in San Francisco and continues to volunteer as general counsel for this organization. He serves on the National Advisory Council of the Asian American Justice Center in Washington, D.C.

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USA Today: Top 10 colleges to major in health and physical fitness

USA Today: Top 10 colleges to major in health and physical fitness | USF in the News | Scoop.it

A degree in health and physical fitness education prepares students for a career assisting others in recreation centers, schools, resorts, health clubs and more. As people continue to place emphasis on the importance of fitness, career opportunities are becoming more readily available.
 

Coursework for this major generally includes classes in exercise science, biology, anatomy, physical education, nutrition, exercise techniques and injury prevention. Additionally, students may be required to take classes to strengthen their teaching and interpersonal skills.
 

The list below breaks down the top 10 places to major in health and fitness education in the U.S. This information is provided by College Factual and is a ranking of colleges based on overall academic quality. [via @USATODAYcollege]

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3. UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO: SAN FRANCISCO
 

The University of San Francisco is a Jesuit school that combines its values with a strong curriculum to help prepare students for success.
 

The Department of Kinesiology at USF offers both a B.A. and a B.S. in exercise and sport science. These programs help students understand human wellness through classes in anatomy, physiology, biology and biomechanics. Graduates enter the work force able to evaluate and analyze movement, while designing programs that help improve fitness or encourage rehabilitation.
 

While USF has a high annual net price, a degree from this school provides students with the best starting earnings boost. Graduates enter the work force earning $45,000 a year on average, increasing to $67,000 at the mid-career level.


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Martina P Mason's curator insight, November 19, 1:53 PM

One of my biggest concerns when applying to colleges was and still is trying figure what is a good place for me to play sports and get the education I need to further my career. A huge part of me wants to leave the state for college but I don’t know if that is a good option for me so that is something I’m trying to figure out also. I want a career in Physical Therapy when I graduate from college so I need to find a school that is going to be helpful to me in that sense. I learned that according to this article of the top 10 colleges for health and physical therapy none of those ten schools are in state. So then I think that it may be more beneficial to go out of state like my first instinct. Then again I don’t intend on attending a big university so is this article helpful to me making the decision to leave the state or stay in state.

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International Business Times: Does The CIA Still Torture Suspects? Senate Report Raises Questions About Obama Administration Policies

International Business Times: Does The CIA Still Torture Suspects? Senate Report Raises Questions About Obama Administration Policies | USF in the News | Scoop.it

As President Barack Obama and top government officials voice concerns at the findings of the newly released Senate report on CIA torture, experts say the Obama administration is not doing enough to stamp out policies that enable such tactics to continue. The troubling lack of oversight over the CIA revealed in the report, released Tuesday, also suggests it could be difficult to ensure that U.S. intelligence agencies will follow any new official guidelines.


Despite Obama’s 2009 executive order banning the use of torture by the CIA and the subsequent closing of the agency’s black sites, loopholes remain in place that allow for such practices to continue in certain circumstances, said Dr. Rebecca Gordon, a lecturer in philosophy at the University of San Francisco in California and the author of a book on U.S. torture in the post-9/11 era. “The executive order didn't touch any other agencies, and that particularly includes the Joint Special Operations Command, which ran its own secret detention sites,” she said. The clandestine force of the U.S. military continues to operate around the world and has been used more aggressively in the past decade than ever before, according to Business Insider.

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The Buffalo News: 10 years after wrongful murder convictions, inmate set free

The Buffalo News: 10 years after wrongful murder convictions, inmate set free | USF in the News | Scoop.it

After 10 years in prison, Josue Ortiz thought Tuesday was going to be just another day.


It wasn’t until his lawyer sat down with him minutes before his court appearance that he suddenly realized this was the day he had been waiting a decade for.


He was finally being set free, vindicated of the double murder that first sent him to jail.


“Do you know why you’re here today?” defense lawyer Jeremy D. Schwartz asked him.


“Another witness,” Ortiz said.


“No, you’re going home,” Schwartz said.


“I’m going home?” he asked.


“Yeah, you’re going home,” Schwartz said.


It was, Schwartz would later acknowledge, news so jarring, it was difficult for Ortiz to grasp.

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“Most people don’t think innocent people confess,” said Richard Leo, a law professor at the University of San Francisco and an expert about false confessions. “But it doesn’t surprise me. We know people who are mentally ill are more vulnerable.” [via @

University of San Francisco's insight:

Richard A. Leo, PhD, JD, is the Hamill Family Chair in Law and Social Psychology and professor and Dean’s Circle Research Scholar at the University San Francisco School of Law, and a Fellow in the Institute for Legal Research at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law. He was previously a tenured professor of psychology and criminology at U.C. Irvine for a decade (1997-2006), and a professor of sociology and adjunct professor of law at the University of Colorado, Boulder (1994-1997).


Dr. Leo is one of the leading experts in the world on police interrogation practices, the impact of Miranda, psychological coercion, false confessions, and the wrongful conviction of the innocent. Dr. Leo has authored more than 100 articles in leading scientific and legal journals as well as several books, including the multiple award-winning Police Interrogation and American Justice (Harvard University Press, 2008); The Wrong Guys: Murder, False Confessions and the Norfolk Four (The New Press, 2008) with Tom Wells; and, most recently, Confessions of Guilt: From Torture to Miranda and Beyond (Oxford University Press, 2012) with George C. Thomas III.  He is currently working on a book that is tentatively entitled, The Innocence Revolution: A Popular History of the American Discovery of the Wrongly Convicted (with Tom Wells).

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Campus Technology: Campus Spaces Inspired by Tech-Industry Culture

Campus Technology: Campus Spaces Inspired by Tech-Industry Culture | USF in the News | Scoop.it

When the University of San Francisco re-imagined the function of academic advising on campus, it borrowed from its high-tech neighbors to rethink adviser workspaces.


Chalkboard-painted walls, Lego murals, sleeping pods, ping pong tables — companies like Google and Facebook have rewritten the rules not just for how business and social interactions take place, but also for how and where people work. So when the University of San Francisco embarked on a remodel of its academic advising offices, it took inspiration from its Bay Area tech-industry neighbors.

The renovation was partially a matter of necessity. As part of an effort to re-imagine the function of academic advising for its 10,000 students, USF decided to move its advisers out of individual colleges and into the University Center, the hub of student life at the 55-acre campus. But facilities planners knew that finding space for 15 to 20 advisers among the food services, student activities groups and study spaces would be tough.

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KTVU-TV News: USF Politics Professor Annick Wibben on KTVU-TV News

USF International Politics Professor Annick Wibben comments on the release of the Senate's report on the CIA which found that the CIA's interrogation of susp...
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The San Francisco Chronicle: Living together in a town of haves and have-nots

The San Francisco Chronicle: Living together in a town of haves and have-nots | USF in the News | Scoop.it

For the first time in recorded and tabulated history, says the Wealth-X Special Report on America’s Ultra Wealthy, San Francisco (5,460) has beaten out Los Angeles (5,135) in a tally of the number of residents with net worth of more than $30 million. The San Francisco figure was up 12 percent since 2013; Los Angeles was up 4 percent.

This note just confirms what’s been visible to every astute observer of San Francisco: People on Muni are dressing better than ever.

P.S.: In keeping with this, an ad posted on Craigslist last week offered for rent, for $2,800 a month, the sinkhole in the Richmond District. The 60-foot square space (utilities not included) is advertised as near major bus lines and coffee shops.


Meanwhile, Glide, which provides many services and meals and, most important, “unconditional love” to the people of the Tenderloin community, hosted its annual holiday jam, “Legends LIVE” this year, at the Warfield on Thursday night. There were living legends present — Rita MorenoPaula WestJoan BaezJanice Mirikitani and the Rev. Cecil Williams — but attention was paid, too, to those who weren’t: Robin Williams (whose wife, Susan, spoke of her late husband as having a “bit of preacher in him, and a whole lot of choir”), and Maya Angelou, who had agreed to be an honorary co-chair before her death. 


Funds raised by the 28-year-old Chronicle Season of Sharing Fund — largest newspaper holiday fund in the country — crossed the $100 million mark a few weeks ago. This milestone was passed just as the University of San Francisco, which every year bestows a California Prize, announced that the fund is this year’s awardee.

The prize, which comes with a $10,000 check (and will be recognized at an April 29 dinner), is given every year to an organization or individual “making an exceptional difference for the people of our state,” said USF President Paul Fitzgerald. Past honorees have included the San Francisco Giants and the San Francisco Free Clinic.

University of San Francisco's insight:

What: USF California Prize Dinner

 

When: Wednesday, April 29; cocktails begin at 6 p.m.; dinner and awards program at 7 p.m.

 

Where: University of San Francisco campus, 2130 Fulton Street

 

Why: The University of San Francisco (USF) will award its 2015 USF California Prize for Service and the Common Good to the Chronicle Season of Sharing Fund at a gala dinner on Wed., April 29 on the USF campus, located in the heart of San Francisco. Jeffrey Johnson, the Fund’s president and Publisher of the San Francisco Chronicle, will be accepting the USF California Prize during the event.

 

About:  The University of San Francisco California Prize for Service and the Common Good recognizes groundbreaking achievement and significant service to the poor and marginalized. The Chronicle Season of Sharing Fund is a nonprofit organization that offers grants to help families in crisis pay for housing and emergency needs. Through a network of more than 120 community service agencies, the Fund works to identify families in need and provide short-term, critical assistance grants. The Fund also provides financial support to Bay Area Food Banks. The Season of Sharing Fund has delivered more than $98 million in aid to Bay Area families and individuals facing unexpected crises for the last 28 years. 

 

Cost: Individual tickets are $350; proceeds from the dinner benefit USF service-learning programs for students. Tickets available online at http://www.usfca.edu/ca_prize/.

 

More info: Please visit http://www.usfca.edu/ca_prize/ for further details.

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San Francisco Pathways to Citizenship Initiative: Free Citizenship Workshop Fee Waiver Assistance

San Francisco Pathways to Citizenship Initiative: Free Citizenship Workshop Fee Waiver Assistance | USF in the News | Scoop.it
University of San Francisco's insight:

In partnership with the San Francisco Pathways to Citizenship initiative, the University of San Francisco will host a free step-by-step workshop on the naturalization process Saturday, December 6. Attendees will receive application assistance and review by an immigration attorney or qualified legal representative. The event runs from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in USF's McLaren Conference Center, 2130 Fulton Street.

The Pathways to Citizenship workshop is an opportunity to help people learn how to become citizens. Attendees can review their naturalization process, assess their eligibility to naturalize, and if eligible to naturalize, receive assistance. No appointment is needed for this two-hour process.

This is not an immigration reform initiative. SF Pathways to Citizenship initiative is a partnership with the city's Office of Civic Engagement and Immigration Affairs. For more information, visit www.sfcitizenship.org.

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Huffington Post: 'More Powerful Than the March of Mighty Armies Is an Idea Whose Time Has Come'

Huffington Post: 'More Powerful Than the March of Mighty Armies Is an Idea Whose Time Has Come' | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Clarence B. Jones
Diversity Visiting Professor, University of San Francisco


Demonstrators in Ferguson and various major cities nationwide have been peacefully protesting the failure of the St. Louis County grand jury to indict police officer Darren Wilson for the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown Jr. They carry signs that say, "Black Lives Matter," "Claim Power," "No Justice, No Peace," and "Shut It Down." They have also engaged in four-and-a-half-minute "die-ins" (a minute for each hour that Brown's body lay in the street after he was killed) at the entrances of malls, major street intersections, and highway-access ramps.
 

Regrettably, a majority (or at least a substantial number) of white adults either don't understand or are opposed to such demonstrations. "Why are they doing this?" they ask. "This doesn't help their cause."
 [via @huffingtonpost]

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Similarly, I applaud my colleagues at the University of San Francisco for initiating a "teach-in" on the topic of Ferguson and the nationwide protests. Colleges and universities are the preeminent marketplace of ideas. Indeed, teach-ins addressing U.S. policy in Vietnam played a historic role in developing a domestic consensus to end the war. Hopefully other colleges and universities will follow the leadership of the University of San Francisco on shedding light and understanding on the issues raised by Ferguson and their potential role in enabling our country to be the very best that it can be.


University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Jones is currently a Visiting Professor, University of San Francisco and a Scholar Writer in Residence, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research & Education Institute, Stanford University, and Palo Alto, CA.
 

Dr. Jones has received numerous state and national awards recognizing his significant contributions to American society. Through his work in the civil rights movement, he has dramatically impacted the course of American history. He assisted Dr. King in the drafting of his celebrated "I Have A Dream" speech that he delivered at the March On Washington, August 28th 1963. In September 1971, he again found himself at the center of history-in-the-making when, at the request of Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller; he was requested to help negotiate an end to the historic Attica prison inmate rebellion

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Huffington Post: Why ‘Family Bonding' During The Holidays Actually Matters, According To Science

Huffington Post: Why ‘Family Bonding' During The Holidays Actually Matters, According To Science | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Thanksgiving marks the beginning of the official “Holiday Season,” a time of year that is focused on family as well as fun. But in recent years, smartphones and other technologies are growing increasingly common, often detracting from the time we spend with the people we love. However, you may not need to choose between your family and your phone. These gadgets can actually enhance your bonding time -- it just depends how you use them.
 

According to the Pew Research Internet Project, 90 percent of Americans owned a cell phone and 83 percent of adults between the ages of 18 to 29 were smartphone users at the beginning of 2014. To say that technology has forever changed the way we interact with one another and altered the way families spend time together during holidays is nothing new; however, these telling numbers have exposed the complexities that evolved our relationship to our devices, and, subsequently, to our loved ones. [via @HuffingtonPost]

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So what impact could technology actually have on these occasions? Professor Jim Taylor at the University of San Francisco wrote on Psychology Today that “the ramifications of [tech’s influence on family bonding is] profound. Less connection -- the real kind -- means that families aren’t able to build relationships as strong as they could be nor are they able to maintain them as well.”

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Jim Taylor is internationally recognized for his work in the psychology of sport. Dr. Taylor has been a consultant for the United States and Japanese Ski Teams, the United States Tennis Association, and USA Triathlon, and has worked with professional and Olympic athletes in tennis, skiing, triathlon, football, baseball, cycling, golf, and many other sports. Dr. Taylor received his Bachelor's degree from Middlebury College and earned his Master's degree and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Colorado. A former alpine ski racer who held a top-20 national ranking and competed internationally, Dr. Taylor is a certified tennis coach, a 2nd degree black belt in karate, a marathon runner, and an Ironman triathlete. Dr. Taylor is the author of ten books, including Applying Sport Psychology (lead editor), the Prime Sport book series, Psychological Approaches to Sports Injury Rehabilitation, Comprehensive Sports Injury Management, Psychology of Dance, Positive Pushing: How to Raise a Successful and Happy Child, and Your Children are Under Attack: How Popular Culture is Destroying Your Kids’ Values, and How You Can Protect Them. He has published over 500 articles in popular and professional publications and has given more than 600 workshops and presentations throughout the North America and Europe. To learn more, visit www.drjimtaylor.com.

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China Daily USA: Tencent looks to up app game on US campus

China Daily USA: Tencent looks to up app game on US campus | USF in the News | Scoop.it

WeChat, the Chinese mobile application, is making a push on college campuses as it aims to catch WhatsApp in the US market.

WeChat had 468 million monthly active users during the second quarter of 2014, slightly less than Silicon Valley-founded WhatsApp, which has more than 500 million.

Chinese students often introduce WeChat to their classmates, friends and professors at US universities, especially in California, the state with the largest Chinese-American population.

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Stanley Kwong, professor of marketing and business administration at the University of San Francisco, said it was a smart move for Tencent to make a push on campus.

A survey of more than 2,000 consumers found that 51 percent of young US buyers said they would purchase Chinese products. Kwong said it is eaiser to attract American users under age 25, rather than older generations who associate "Made in China" with cheap, low-quality products, Kwong said.

Understanding local cultures is important for Chinese companies to brand themselves and expand their markets globally, said Kwong, who believes the English name - WeChat - is a clever strategy in a bid to go global. 

University of San Francisco's insight:

Stanley Kwong brings to USF over 30 years of international management, marketing and teaching experience in the US, China, India, and Central Europe. Professor Kwong is recognized as a leading expert on marketing strategy, branding, and investments policies and is frequently interviewed on branding in China and Chinese investments in the U.S. by top media, such as the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, SingTao News, and Chinese World Journal. He is a highly desired guest speaker at industry conferences and universities worldwide.
 

As a former Worldwide Program Director for IBM Developers Marketing, Professor Kwong shares his multifaceted experience-based knowledge of outsourcing and offshoring, globalization trends, marketing management and international business with his undergraduate, MBA and MBAE students.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Ethnic studies requirement proposed for S.F. high schools

San Francisco Chronicle: Ethnic studies requirement proposed for S.F. high schools | USF in the News | Scoop.it

San Francisco’s school board president wants high school students to take a course that examines ethnic identity, race-based systems of oppression and the emphasis on Euro-centric history in traditional textbooks.


Not everyone agrees that’s a good idea. Critics see ethnic studies as racially divisive. Another concern is that hiring and training new teachers is a potentially expensive proposition. And adding a new class means subtracting one from students’ schedules.


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Course trade-off

“Do you need to take five AP courses? Or could you take four and take ethnic studies instead?” she asked and noted that the ethnic studies classes now in district high schools count toward the elective course requirement needed to get into the UC or CSU systems.


Fewer and ethnic studies supporters believe the course offers students, especially students of color, a unique perspective on who they are, where they come from and what their place is in a racially charged society.


Often, their histories are “under-narrated” in their classes, said Patrick Camangian, an associate professor of teacher education at the University of San Francisco.


In other words, the historical account of African Americans, Latinos, Asians or other ethnicities is often relegated to minor roles or side notes in public schools and teaching materials.


“Ethnic studies to me is sort of a way of life that can allow teachers to more effectively connect to students who don’t see themselves as part of the standard curriculum,” Camangian said. “It provides them an education that is in their own image, maybe in their own interest.” [via @sfchronicle]


University of San Francisco's insight:

Patrick Camangian is an assistant professor in the Teacher Education Department at the University of San Francisco. He was an English teacher for seven years at Crenshaw High School in Los Angeles, where he was awarded "Most Inspirational Teacher" by former mayor Richard Riordan and the school's student body. Professor Camangian currently volunteers at Mandela High School in Oakland teaching tenth grade English. He has collaborated with groups such as California's Association of Raza Educators, the Education for Liberation national network, and San Francisco's Teachers 4 Social Justice.

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Fast Company: Solving Hidden Problem - The Struggle To Remove Barriers To Girls Education Globally

Fast Company: Solving Hidden Problem - The Struggle To Remove Barriers To Girls Education Globally | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The importance of providing economic resources to women worldwide is widely documented as a significant factor in human development.


Women face a wide range of discrimination stemming from cultural and institutional norms ranging from early marriage and violence against women to reduced access to schools, loans, and even public spaces. These factors were documented in the recent United Nations report "Human Development Report 2014, Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience."


These inequities result in poorer human development overall. The number of malnourished children averages 60% higher in countries where women do not have the right to own land and 85% higher in countries where women do not have access to credit. [via @fastcompany]

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Attorney and University of San Francisco Assistant Law Professor Thomas A. Nazario founded The Forgotten International, a foundation that works on alleviating the suffering caused by poverty in the U.S. and worldwide. He found that even obscure issues can be barriers to girls attending school. At a New Delhi, India, school he visited, bathroom facilities were two holes in the ground in back of the school. He says girls would simply stop coming to school because of the ridicule they faced from boys when they used the bathroom, especially after puberty. In some areas, access to clean water, child labor norms, or lack of trained educators all stand in the way of providing education overall, and limited resources are often directed at boys first.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Thomas Nazario is an attorney and Assistant Professor of Law at the University of San Francisco School of Law. His expertise lies in the fields of Community Civic Education, Children’s Rights, Family Law, Civil Rights Litigation, Education Policy, Human Rights and Economic Justice, particularly as they relate to women and children worldwide.
 

Professor Nazario has authored four books on children’s rights including the nationally acclaimed, In Defense of Children. These publications have made him a recognized expert on the legal rights and problems of children in America. He has appeared on CNN, Oprah Winfrey, Larry King, the Today Show, and the Tom Snyder Show, as well as dozens of other television and radio programs while, at the same time, serving as a consultant to law firms throughout the country litigating cases involving children who have been abused or neglected, the subject of an intense custody battle, lost in foster care, or injured or killed as a result of someone’s negligence.

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NBC News: Anticipated Immigration Action Welcome, But Far From Perfect

NBC News: Anticipated Immigration Action Welcome, But Far From Perfect | USF in the News | Scoop.it

President Obama’s anticipated executive action on immigration is long overdue, but still might not include important provisions for Asian Americans, said Bill Ong Hing, founder of the Immigration Legal Resource Center and University of San Francisco law professor.


Missing from the list of policy details so far has been any positive mention of the petitioning of older siblings, the historical way Asian families have reunited in America. “We’re disappointed that wasn’t on the list,” Hing said in an interview with NBC News. “He could have taken action on that. We’re still going to fight for that.”

It's estimated that of the 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States, 1.4 million are either Asian or from the Pacific Islands.


Hing praised any executive action that could provide deportation relief for up to five million people by expanding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) and making it possible for those not here legally to apply for temporary work permits.

“There are people here who are helping society, helping the economy, have strong family ties, and make contributions to this county,” said Hing. “In my opinion, they’ve earned the right to be here.” [via @NBCNews]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Throughout his career, USF Professor Bill Ong Hing pursued social justice through a combination of community work, litigation, and scholarship. He is the author of numerous academic and practice-oriented publications on immigration policy and race relations, including Ethical Borders—NAFTA, Globalization, and Mexican Migration(Temple University Press, 2010), Deporting Our Souls-Morality, Values, and Immigration Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2006), Defining America Through Immigration Policy (Temple University Press, 2004), and Making and Remaking Asian America Through Immigration Policy (Stanford University Press, 1993).

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