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KCBS Radio News: Lack of Diversity in Tech Industry

KCBS Radio News: Lack of Diversity in Tech Industry | USF in the News | Scoop.it

KCBS Radio reports on the Rev. Jesse Jackson's visit to the Hewlett Packard annual shareholders meeting to bring attention to Silicon Valley's poor record of including blacks and Latinos in hiring, board appointments and startup funding.


USF's Vice Provost Mary Wardell-Ghiraraduzzi spoke with KCBS Radio News about Jackson's strategy and why people of color need to be part of the booming tech industry.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Mary J. Wardell-Ghirarduzzi has been working in various roles in higher education administration for the past 18 years and is currently part of leadership at the University of San Francisco. Working with faculty, staff and students, and diverse communities through the San Francisco Bay area, she promotes an understanding of diversity as core to a holistic and sustainable higher education organization. 

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ABC News: New SF Top Cop Faces Tough Road Ahead to Mend Racial Tensions

ABC News: New SF Top Cop Faces Tough Road Ahead to Mend Racial Tensions | USF in the News | Scoop.it

San Francisco Deputy Chief Toney Chaplin may have the toughest job in the city right now as the newly appointed acting police chief.

 

Retired San Francisco Police Chief Anthony Ribera said Chaplin must also discipline and organize the department across all aspects of police work, not just the use of force, so that no disciplinary cases go unheard. It’s also critical that he continue Suhr’s commitment to regularly meeting with leaders in the black community to bridge any gaps with the department. Ribera, however, warned that Chaplin is just the interim police chief until the mayor designates a permanent replacement.

 

“There’s a whole lot of talent in the San Francisco Police Department,” said Ribera, who is also the director of the University of San Francisco’s International Institute of Criminal Justice Leadership. “If the mayor is listening to me -- take a good hard look within the department before you start thinking about going with someone outside.”

 

University of San Francisco's insight:
​University of San Francisco (USF) School of Management professor and former Police Chief of San Francisco, Tony Ribera comments on the forced resignation of San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr amid the public outcry over lethal force and police misconduct. Ribera believes the resignation had to happen, but that Chief Suhr should leave with his head held high after a long career of public service.  
 
As retired Police Chief of San Francisco, Professor Ribera believes effective leaders are ethical leaders, underscoring the core values of the Jesuit tradition, promoting conscientious action for social justice. In 2001, USF formed the International Institute of Criminal Justice Leadership and appointed Professor Ribera as its director. 
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National Public Radio (NPR): Does Old-School Political Advertising Work Anymore?

National Public Radio (NPR): Does Old-School Political Advertising Work Anymore? | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Donald Trump says he's rewritten the rules of media coverage and political advertising — he points to his primary victories. NPR examines whether that might be the case in the general election as well.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Ken Goldstein is a professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco and Faculty Director of the USF in DC program. He also teaches in USF's Masters' Program in Public Affairs, which focuses on the skills needed to run a modern political campaign.

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Bloomberg: Senate Candidates Spending Big on TV Ads in the Year of Trump

Bloomberg: Senate Candidates Spending Big on TV Ads in the Year of Trump | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Television executives worried about potential lost revenue if Donald Trump doesn't advertise as much as past presidential candidates can take solace in this: There are likely to be at least a half dozen competitive U.S. Senate races in mostly big states where it's expensive to buy airtime.

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“Trump at the top of the ticket may lead to even greater spending in down-ballot races as certain states become more competitive and groups that were planning on spending in the presidential contest re-direct resources,” said Ken Goldstein, a University of San Francisco professor who is a Bloomberg Politics polling and advertising analyst.

Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., Tribune Media Co. and Nexstar Broadcasting Group Inc., among the largest owners of broadcast TV stations in the U.S., could benefit from increased political advertising.

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[via @bpolitics]

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Ohio.com: Big-money pours into Ohio to tell half a story

Ohio.com: Big-money pours into Ohio to tell half a story | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Joel Botts doesn’t remember the day it all happened — the day he became the center of attention in the most expensive U.S. Senate race in America.

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“It’s Politics 101: The folks who are writing the big checks typically don’t want the publicity and probably wouldn’t enjoy being talked about in the third person,” said Ken Goldstein, a political science professor at the University of San Francisco. “My sense is the donor class is getting a little more involved in the decision making but generally cede that to the folks who run the campaign.”

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[via @AkronBeacon]

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LA Times: Trump's border rhetoric emboldens officials on local level to target immigration, activists say

LA Times: Trump's border rhetoric emboldens officials on local level to target immigration, activists say | USF in the News | Scoop.it

After watching Donald Trump gain traction on the campaign trail with talk of border walls and mass deportations, Indiana lawmaker Mike Delph decided it was time to take action in his state.

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Bill Ong Hing, an immigration law professor at the University of San Francisco, said he believes there will be a ripple effect of Trump’s candidacy.

“I have absolutely no doubt that the fact that he has thrived largely on anti-immigrant rhetoric is a direct license to local and state government officials who were leaning toward anti-immigrant legislation,” Hing said. “I really think they feel emboldened that he’s thrived and they can do the same thing.”

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[via @latimes]

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Bloomberg: Trump-vs.-Clinton Race Scrambles Silicon Valley Vote

Bloomberg: Trump-vs.-Clinton Race Scrambles Silicon Valley Vote | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In 2012 venture capitalist Marc Andreessen publicly abandoned the Democratic Party, announcing that he’d back Republican Mitt Romney. “I turned 40 last year, and so I figured it was time to make the switch,” he said in an interview with CNBC. He gave $100,000 to a super-PAC supporting Romney. But on May 3, after Donald Trump became the presumptive Republican nominee, Andreessen sent a brief tweet indicating that this year he plans to throw his support behind Democrat Hillary Clinton: “#ImWithHer.”

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This year, Bernie Sanders has raised more than Clinton among people in the tech industry, according to Crowdpac, a startup that tracks money in politics. Many of Sanders’s donations have come from small donors. Trump’s victory in the Republican race may draw some Sanders supporters to Clinton’s side, says Donnie Fowler, a lecturer at the University of San Francisco who worked as national field director for Al Gore’s 2000 presidential campaign. “While Clinton has not proven the darling of the online techie donor crowd when the choice is Bernie vs. Hillary,” he says, “things are gonna change when it’s Hillary vs. Donald.”

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[via @bpolitics]

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Aljazeera: Cecilia McDowel on Possible Brazil President Impeachment

Aljazeera: Cecilia McDowel on Possible Brazil President Impeachment | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Director of Latin American Studies, Cecilia McDowel, was featured on Aljazeera talking about the possible impeachment of the Brazil president, Dilma Rousseff. McDowel says that it is difficult to predict the outcome due to the economic recession, the zinka virus, and the upcoming Olympics.

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[via @AJEnglish]

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SF Business Times: With Stephen Curry's 2 MVP awards, can the Golden State Warriors afford him after his contract ends? - San Francisco Business Times

SF Business Times: With Stephen Curry's 2 MVP awards, can the Golden State Warriors afford him after his contract ends? - San Francisco Business Times | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry has rewritten the record book — including his 17-point overtime performance in Tuesday night's victory over Portland. But with Curry winning the National Basketball Association's Most Valuable Player for the second-straight year, will the Warriors pay up to keep him when his contract expires after next season?

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As a back-to-back MVP, and the first unanimous MVP in NBA history, Curry's fortunes (literally) will rise. He could command a three-year, $18 million to $20 million-a-year contract at the beginning of negotiations, said Michael Goldman, a sports management professor at the University of San Francisco.

By comparison, now-retired Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant made $25 million this year, the Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James (who the Warriors beat in last year's NBA Finals) made $23 million and the Oklahoma City Thunder's Kevin Durant made $22 million.

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[via @SFBusinessTimes]

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National Catholic Reporter: Berrigan's witness to nonviolence challenged church and nation | National Catholic Reporter

Jesuit Fr. Daniel Berrigan, who died at the end of April, not only challenged the conscience of the Catholic church and the nation on the dangers of militarism and the need to affirm Christ's teachings of nonviolence, he challenged those who oppose war to engage in direct action to stop it.

He was a devout Catholic amid the largely secular anti-war left. He opposed abortion as a form of violence while most of his colleagues in the peace movement identified as "pro-choice." He remained a priest while many of his contemporaries, including his brother Philip, left the priesthood for marriage or over doctrinal disputes. Berrigan was guided not by adherence to a particular ideology, but by a deep faith in God through the nonviolent witness of Jesus Christ.

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[via @NCRonline]

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SF Chronicle: Pelosi, Lee won’t take sides in Clinton versus Sanders

SF Chronicle: Pelosi, Lee won’t take sides in Clinton versus Sanders | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Rep. Barbara Lee and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi are rarely shy about taking stands on issues, except when it comes to the question “Bernie or Hillary?”

Lee and Pelosi are the only two elected Bay Area Democrats who have not publicly endorsed either Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders or former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Even Pelosi’s daughter Christine Pelosi is backing Clinton, and appeared at the opening of Clinton’s new San Francisco field office Monday.

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Ideologically, Lee and Clinton “are on the opposite sides of issues” like mass incarceration and the 1994 crime bill that sent more people of color to prison, often for drug crimes — Hillary Clinton supported it and President Clinton signed it into law, said James Taylor, a professor of political science at the University of San Francisco and author of “Black Nationalism in the United States: From Malcolm X to Barack Obama.”

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[via @sfchronicle]

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Daily Mail: How children bring out the tiger in mum

Daily Mail: How children bring out the tiger in mum | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Men have long been considered the more competitive sex.

But women actually trump them if it benefits their children, research suggests.

Mothers will be more competitive than fathers if the welfare of their youngsters is at stake, a study has found.

An experiment found women were more likely than men to win in a contest if their children benefited at the end.

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Alessandra Cassar, a professor of economics at the University of San Francisco, and lead author of the study, said that the results showed women worry about how they are perceived.

She said: 'For women, we always have to manage our image. We don't want to be seen as bossy but we can compete for children or other people because that does not lower our image'.

Professor Cassar said if the findings, published in journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, were applied to the workplace it could revolutionise the office.

Women could shun high-powered, well-paid jobs for those offering scholarships for their children or on-site childcare. She said: '[Employers should] be creative so women will compete and high-ability women will take over, and overall the economy will be better off, not just because we would have the diversity but also because there would be more ability'.

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[via @DailyMail]
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CNN: Women will compete to help their children, study says

CNN: Women will compete to help their children, study says | USF in the News | Scoop.it

(CNN)A lot of research suggests women are less competitive than men. Study after study has found that, when given the choice of how they want to be compensated for tasks, men prefer to compete with peers for bigger but riskier payoffs, whereas women usually opt not to engage in competition and receive a guaranteed, set rate for their work.

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The difference could be that it is more socially acceptable for women to show their competitive streak for their children than for money.
"For women, we always have to manage our image. We don't want to be seen as bossy but we can compete for children or other people because that does not lower our image," said Alessandra Cassar, professor of economics at the University of San Francisco, and lead author of the study that was recently published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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[via @CNN]
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硅谷乒乓球桌卖得不好 有人说这是科技公司要完

硅谷乒乓球桌卖得不好 有人说这是科技公司要完 | USF in the News | Scoop.it
导语:国外媒体本周刊文称,近期,硅谷的乒乓球桌销量正在下降,这或许反映了硅谷科技泡沫的走向。在硅谷科技行业,打乒乓球被认为是员工的应得权利之一。以下为文章主要内容:Twitter上周发布的季度财报令许多投资者忧心。不过,如果他们关注另一项重
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KTVU: Next Chief Must Focus on Rising Crime Rate

University of San Francisco (USF) School of Management professor and former Police Chief of San Francisco, Tony Ribera comments on the forced resignation of San…

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SF Small Business Week: “Continuity Support is essential for SF Small Businesses” #SFSBW2016 Interview: USF Gellert Family Business Resource Center

SF Small Business Week: “Continuity Support is essential for SF Small Businesses” #SFSBW2016 Interview: USF Gellert Family Business Resource Center | USF in the News | Scoop.it

#SFSBW2016 asked our business resources to share insights, best practices, and examples of how they help small business owners flourish. Today we hear from USF Gellert Family Business Resource Center.

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[via @sfsmallbusiness]

University of San Francisco's insight:

It’s that time of year again when the University of San Francisco (USF) Gellert Family Business Center recognizes extraordinary business achievement and community service. The USF School of Management is proud to announce Cha Cha Cha Restaurant on Haight Street and Navarro’s Academy of Martial Arts as the recipients of the 2016 Gellert Family Business Award!

 

To celebrate them, USF will host a formal awards ceremony to honor these two successful family businesses on Tuesday, May 24 from 5:15 to 7:30 in the evening. Through tenacity and passion, Cha Cha Cha and Navarro’s Academy have helped bring their individual communities together with engaging activities such as food donations and providing a safe haven for neighborhood children. Thank you to the Carl Gellert and Celia Berta Gellert Foundation for making this award possible.

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Mercury News: War over words surfaces in California's classrooms over India's history

Mercury News: War over words surfaces in California's classrooms over India's history | USF in the News | Scoop.it

As one of a handful of Hindu-Americans in her high school in Cupertino in the mid-to-late 1980s, Suhag Shukla still can't shake the memory of just how awkward a lesson in her ninth-grade class on India turned was for her.

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The state's Instruction Quality Commission is considering the changes and is scheduled to discuss them at a July 19 meeting. Tom Adams, deputy superintendent of instruction for the California Department of Education, said the changes are based on the recommendation of scholars of the region, in an effort to better inform students of the latest historical research and make them aware of the contribution of all groups, including those who have not received appropriate recognition in the past. "There was no overarching intent to eliminate India. We did not erase India from the textbooks," said Vijaya Nagarajan, an associate professor of theology at University of San Francisco, who was among the scholars in the South Asian Faculty Group who recommended the changes. "That was simply not true."

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[via @mercnews]

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NBC: South Asian Community Debates 'South Asia,' 'India' Ahead of Textbook Updates

NBC: South Asian Community Debates 'South Asia,' 'India' Ahead of Textbook Updates | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Whose version of history will make it into California's new textbooks is the subject of a heated debate within the South Asian American community.

Opposing groups are battling over some 30 proposed changes to the state's history and social science framework set to be voted on later this year that may alter text about South Asian history for sixth and seventh graders, specifically certain references to "India" and "South Asia," among others.

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"What they're going to do is erase any kind of memory of a civilization of continuity or existence in India, and that is discriminatory," said Vamsee Juluri, a professor of media studies at University of San Francisco.

"The changes the South Asia Faculty Group have pushed through are part of a way of thinking that essentially blames little school children in California for the Nazi Holocaust," he added. (Juluri is referring to a still-debated theory about the origins of South Asians as descendants of Indo-Aryans, a highly controversial interpretation of which links Hinduism to the rise of Nazi Germany.) Juluri believes the group is promoting the notion of Indo-Aryan migration as an Orientalist myth.

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[via @NBCNews]

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Christian Science Monitor: Catholic campuses give culture wars a different twist

Christian Science Monitor: Catholic campuses give culture wars a different twist | USF in the News | Scoop.it

As a national debate over religious liberty enflames passions, many Catholic colleges are challenging students to respect those who have different views on issues from abortion to same-sex marriage.

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“Universities should be a safe place for everybody, but not a comfortable place for anybody,” says the Rev. Stephen Privett, chancellor of the University of San Francisco.

 

“The church began in diversity and was able to find some kind of unity in all that diversity,” he adds. “We need to be churched in a way that’s inclusive, respectful of differences in society. We have no obligation to impose our teachings or convictions on the [broader] population.” [via @csmonitor]

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Press Democrat: What makes Warriors' Stephen Curry so popular?

Press Democrat: What makes Warriors' Stephen Curry so popular? | USF in the News | Scoop.it

He’s humble. He’s of normal height. He has a lovely wife and two adorable kids he’s proud of. He lives a clean life. He seems to be a real, genuine, nice guy.

He is also the finest basketball player in the game today, the first unanimous Most Valuable Player ever and the internationally idolized face of the reigning NBA champion Golden State Warriors.

Stephen Curry.

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Why is Curry more than a mighty fine basketball player?

University of San Francisco associate professor of sport management Michael Goldman studies just those kinds of questions.

“You’ve got to have two things going for you,” he said.

First, you have to be very good at your sport. Not a superstar, but it helps. Check.

Second, you need to have an interesting personality. Something regular people can relate to. Check.

“It’s about an authentic, individual personal brand. What we have in Steph Curry is the family, an authenticity, an underdog kind of brand that everyone across the United States and increasingly internationally can identify with,” he said.

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[via @NorthBayNews]

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KQED: Iglesias on Building Violations

Law professor, Tim Iglesias, was featured on KQED talking about the building violations at the Academy of Art University. The school has over twenty buildings against code and Iglesias said that the city "goes easier" on large companies.

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KQED: Through Social Media, Family Connects to Rare Diagnosis – And Hope

KQED: Through Social Media, Family Connects to Rare Diagnosis – And Hope | USF in the News | Scoop.it

If you are suffering from an illness fewer than a dozen people in the world are known to have, getting a proper diagnosis can start to feel like a hunt for something that doesn’t exist.

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Crowdsourcing Diagnoses Takes Hold

Patients or parents like Tess’ who are seeking answers to seemingly unsolvable medical mysteries have new tools to reach out, not only on social media, but in crowdsourcing websites like CrowdMed, a subscription service for people seeking answers to medical conundrums.

 

At CrowdMed, people who have symptoms but have yet to find a diagnosis seek opinions from the site’s “medical detectives,” only some of whom are medical professionals.

 

The process involves patients posting their symptoms and other relevant data, opening their case up to the site’s diagnostic community. When a diagnosis is offered, the other “detectives” vote on it, and that opinion moves up or down according to those votes and the weight assigned to each diagnostician, which is determined by their past accuracy.

 

“We call it a stock market for diagnoses,” CrowdMed co-founder Jessica Greenwalt told Future of You editor Jon Brooks at a University of San Francisco medical technology conference in March.

 

She said the site had resolved close to 800 cases in which the patient has reported the CrowdMed diagnosis was correct.

“The nice thing about not limiting it to physicians,” Greenwalt said, “is we get people who are not stuck in the same method of thought training. Or they’re not afraid to suggest the rare diagnosis. We see this a lot, where doctors are afraid to say it might be this rare condition.” [via @KQED]

University of San Francisco's insight:

USF's Social Entrepreneurship & Innovation Conference took place in March 2016 and brought together business leaders, investors, social entrepreneurs, as well as graduate students, to discuss how can technology be a driver for positive change.

 

This included powerful keynotes sesions and panels covering topics central to tech and social good from leading tech companies and social investors. Topics include: MedTech, EdTech, Shared Economy Companies, Financial Inclusion, Social Investing and Consumer Activism and Corporate Transparency in Purchasing.

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Record Searchlight: Argument over tax revenue for jail favors city

Last Tuesday, while an $11 million spending plan was receiving the endorsement of Redding and Shasta County officials, a legal question was brewing over whether cities can fund jail improvements when they have no obligation to do so.

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Bikku Kuruvila is a visiting scholar at University of San Francisco School of Law, who teaches local government law. Darien Shanske is one of three authors to the Oxford Commentaries on the California State Constitution. The writer of the commentary to the gifts of public funds section in the state constitution, Shanske is a law professor of local government and finances at University of California, Davis School of Law.

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[via @ReddingNewsFeed]

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USFCA.EDU: USF Selects Cha Cha Cha Restaurant and Navarro’s Academy of Martial Arts to Receive 2016 Family Business Award

USFCA.EDU: USF Selects Cha Cha Cha Restaurant and Navarro’s Academy of Martial Arts to Receive 2016 Family Business Award | USF in the News | Scoop.it

SAN FRANCISCO (May 10, 2016) – The University of San Francisco (USF) School of Management is proud to announce Cha Cha Cha Restaurant on Haight Street and Navarro’s Academy of Martial Arts are the recipients of the 2016 Gellert Family Business Award. The annual award recognizes extraordinary business achievement and community engagement, and is made possible by a generous gift from The Carl Gellert and Celia Berta Gellert Foundation. Cha Cha Cha and Navarro’s Academy of Martial Arts will be honored during a formal awards ceremony on Tuesday, May 24 from 5:15 - 7:30 p.m. in the Handlery Dining Room on USF's Lone Mountain (2800 Turk Blvd., San Francisco 94117). 

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[via @usfca]

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Journal Sentinel: Trump at top of ticket makes Johnson’s re-election bid all the tougher

Journal Sentinel: Trump at top of ticket makes Johnson’s re-election bid all the tougher | USF in the News | Scoop.it

GOP Sen. Ron Johnson was already facing a tough re-election fight in Wisconsin.

Now he has to worry about the potentially convulsive impact of Donald Trump on the top of the Republican ticket.

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"Put Mitt Romney, George W. Bush or Dwight Eisenhower on the ticket, and that would be a tough race for Ron Johnson no matter what," said University of San Francisco political scientist Ken Goldstein, who spent many years at the University of Wisconsin.

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[via @journalsentinel]

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SF Gate: Cruz bows to Trump, so California GOP primary won’t matter as much

SF Gate: Cruz bows to Trump, so California GOP primary won’t matter as much | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Donald Trump is virtually certain to be the Republican nominee for president — and there is little that California voters can do to stop him.

Trump’s last significant hurdle fell Tuesday when Texas Sen. Ted Cruz suspended his White House campaign after Trump crushed him in the Indiana primary, virtually ensuring that Trump will be the GOP candidate in November and that California’s June 7 GOP primary won’t be as important.

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"Cruz moved from a clear embrace and refusal to attack Trump at all to one of the most jaw-dropping attack press conferences I have ever seen,” said Ken Goldstein, a professor of political science at the University of San Francisco who has been tracking campaign advertising. “This is clearly, not too little, but clearly much much too late and Cruz (was) not the best messenger.”

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[via @SFGate]

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