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KCBS Radio News: Lack of Diversity in Tech Industry

KCBS Radio News: Lack of Diversity in Tech Industry | USF in the News | Scoop.it

KCBS Radio reports on the Rev. Jesse Jackson's visit to the Hewlett Packard annual shareholders meeting to bring attention to Silicon Valley's poor record of including blacks and Latinos in hiring, board appointments and startup funding.


USF's Vice Provost Mary Wardell-Ghiraraduzzi spoke with KCBS Radio News about Jackson's strategy and why people of color need to be part of the booming tech industry.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Mary J. Wardell-Ghirarduzzi has been working in various roles in higher education administration for the past 18 years and is currently part of leadership at the University of San Francisco. Working with faculty, staff and students, and diverse communities through the San Francisco Bay area, she promotes an understanding of diversity as core to a holistic and sustainable higher education organization. 

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Investor confidence drops in Q2 amid disappointing exit market, high late-stage valuations - USF Prof Cannice, PE Hub

Investor confidence drops in Q2 amid disappointing exit market, high late-stage valuations - USF Prof Cannice, PE Hub | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Confidence among Silicon Valley venture investors plummeted in the second quarter, amid uncertainty about high late-stage valuations, a disappointing exit market, and political uncertainty. That’s according to the Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index, which fell to 3.52 in Q2 from 3.8

 

@ PEHub

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Prof Richard Leo Makes Case to Record Police Interrogations, Las Vegas Sun (Al Jazeera)

Prof Richard Leo Makes Case to Record Police Interrogations, Las Vegas Sun (Al Jazeera) | USF in the News | Scoop.it

By Joseph Stepansky, Al Jazeera, Doha, Qatar (TNS)

Monday, July 31, 2017 | 2 a.m.

 

NEW YORK — In a black T-shirt, hair cropped short, with a wedding ring visible on his finger, Ted Bradford hunched over a microphone in a legislative hearing room in Carson City.

 

In a public video of the meeting, Bradford can be seen speaking to the assembled senators representing the nearly 2.9 million Nevada residents. “I lived through the nightmare of wrongful conviction,” he says. “It was a horrible crime, a crime of rape and burglary.”

On the day of the meeting in June 2017, Bradford had come to Carson City to support a law that would require police agencies in the state to electronically record interrogations of suspects taken into custody. The proposed legislation would have mandated that police interrogations be recorded in their entirety, from the reading of Miranda rights to the end of the interview, depending on the severity of the crime.

 

“Here I was in this small room with two detectives being accused of this, and I knew I was innocent,” Bradford recounted for the assembled audience. “And I tried telling them, you’ve got the wrong guy.”

 

Bradford believes the fact that his interrogation was not fully recorded may have cost him 14 years of his life — 10 years in prison and four more awaiting a retrial, which finally cleared his name. Only the last half-hour of Bradford’s interrogation was recorded and shown in court.

 

...

“They kept telling me ‘we know you’re a liar, you’ve got to tell us the truth’ ... This went on for over nine hours that I was there,” Bradford said. “Nothing to eat or drink, exhausted, they kept telling me over and over — you’re not getting out of this room until you tell us what happened ... So in my mind, I thought, the only way I’m getting out of here is if I make up this story, and tell them that I did it.”

 

The phenomenon of false confessions

Evidence of false confessions in the U.S. has been around since the Salem witch trials, says Richard Leo, a professor of law and social psychology at the University of San Francisco.

 

In an interview, Leo explains that the phenomenon has only been really accepted in both law enforcement and the public eye in the last 30 years, around the time when the technology of DNA testing became good enough to allow groups like the Innocence Project to prove wrongful convictions.

 

Since 1989, 350 wrongfully convicted people have been exonerated through DNA evidence. The Innocence Project says false confessions played a role in around a third of those cases. When including people who were cleared through other means, the National Registry of Exonerations has tracked 2,066 people who had been exonerated of convictions since 1989.

 

“There are hundreds of false of confessions out there from DNA exonerations, and they have to be the tip of the iceberg, because it’s almost impossible to prove confessions false,” said Leo.

Leo explains that to understand false confessions in the U.S., one must understand the basis of interrogation training that has pervaded law enforcement for the last 70 years.

 

Recent passage in California, New York and Texas — three of the United States’ four most populous states — of laws requiring the taping of police interrogations give supporters hope that it is just a matter of time before similar laws are passed in every state.

 

A similar effort in Nevada was defeated in the 2017 Legislature

A confrontational style of interrogating, known originally as the Reid technique, is generally considered by experts in cases of coerced confessions to be responsible for “some, if not most, if not all” false confessions, Leo said.

 

While the method may go by different names with slight variances, the underlying style, what Leo calls a “guilt-presumptive accusatory method,” has remained prominent in modern American law enforcement.

“(In this technique) you determine someone is guilty of the crime and the goal is not to get the truth, it’s to get them to confess to what you, the officer, believe is the truth, your theory of the truth. So you pressure, persuade, and sometimes psychologically coerce them,” Leo said.

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European Soccer Teams Are Heavily Investing in U.S. Markets. USF Prof Michael Goldman Explains Why.

European Soccer Teams Are Heavily Investing in U.S. Markets. USF Prof Michael Goldman Explains Why. | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Soccer's reach in the United States is growing thanks in large part to marquee European clubs. And some of their biggest stars are playing this month on American soil.

 

The International Champions Cup, a preseason tournament for the European clubs, is taking place in 11 U.S. cities, featuring big names like Paul Pogba, Neymar, Lionel Messi and Luis Suárez.

 

The tournament is drawing more viewers this year on ESPN -- about 330,000 total for six matches, compared with 315,000 over eight matches last year.

...

International Champions Cup games are often held in emerging soccer markets. Games are being played in Singapore and China, too.

 

The players can get ready for the regular European season with tough match-ups, and coaches can try new formations and lineups without the pressure of standings.

 

But the tournament serves a bigger purpose, said Michael Goldman, an associate sports management professor at the University of San Francisco.

 

At a relatively dead time for American sports -- the NFL, NBA and NHL are all in their offseasons -- soccer fans can see their favorite players and teams up close, either in person or on primetime TV.

 

"The preseason workout aspect has been overtaken by the commercial aspect and the chance to leverage media exposure in the U.S. and China," Goldman said.

 

[via CNN Money]

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USF Law Dean John Trasviña Comments on President Trump's Statement Rescinding Protections for Transgender Military Service Members

"There's a process in place for the Department of Defense, for Congress, for public comment and that's the process that should be followed if you really want a solution."

 

[via ABC 7 News]

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USF Law Prof Richard Leo Comments on the Phenomenon of False Confessions in Police Interrogations 

USF Law Prof Richard Leo Comments on the Phenomenon of False Confessions in Police Interrogations  | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Evidence of false confessions in the US has been around since the Salem witch trials, says Richard Leo, a professor of law and social psychology at the University of San Francisco.

 

In an interview with Al Jazeera, Leo explains that the phenomenon has only been really accepted in both law enforcement and the public eye in the last 30 years, around the time when the technology of DNA testing became good enough to allow groups like the Innocence Project to prove wrongful convictions.

 

Since 1989, 350 wrongfully convicted people have been exonerated through DNA evidence. The Innocence Project says false confessions played a role in around a third of those cases. When including people who were cleared through other means, the National Registry of Exonerations has tracked 2,066 people who had been exonerated of convictions since 1989.

 

"There are hundreds of false of confessions out there [from DNA exonerations], and they have to be the tip of the iceberg, because it's almost impossible to prove confessions false," said Leo.

 

Leo explains that to understand false confessions in the US, one must understand the basis of interrogation training that has pervaded law enforcement for the last 70 years.

 

A confrontational style of interrogating, known originally as the Reid technique, is generally considered by experts in cases of coerced confessions to be responsible for "some, if not most, if not all" false confessions, Leo said.

 

While the method may go by different names with slight variances, the underlying style, what Leo calls a "guilt-presumptive accusatory method," has remained prominent in modern American law enforcement.

 

"[In this technique] you determine someone is guilty of the crime and the goal is not to get the truth, it's to get them to confess to what you, the officer, believe is the truth, your theory of the truth. So you pressure, persuade, and sometimes psychologically coerce them," Leo said.

 

[via Al Jazeera]

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St. Ignatius’ Modern Jesuit Charism Welcomes People to the Parish on the ‘Hilltop’

St. Ignatius’ Modern Jesuit Charism Welcomes People to the Parish on the ‘Hilltop’ | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Jesuit Father John Coleman touched on works of the early church Father St. John Chrysostom, Salvador Dali’s painting of the Ascension and the unfinished last opera of Puccini in his homily at a recent 5 p.m. Sunday Mass as college students, middle-aged and older parishioners listened attentively and young children wriggled in the pews at St. Ignatius.

 

The parish is like that as well, said parishioner Bill Walsh, who likens the St. Ignatius parish experience to that of Little League which he said attracted families from throughout the Bay Area who shared a common interest in their child playing baseball.

 

“You are pulling people from so many places. There isn’t an ‘in crowd.’ Everyone feels they are involved,” said Walsh, who arrived at the parish on the University of San Francisco Hilltop campus because of Jesuit connections. He attended Loyola University in Chicago and some of his children attend and attended St. Ignatius College Preparatory. Once his family started at St. Ignatius parish, “The city got a lot smaller to me.”

 

[via Catholic San Francisco]

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USF Prof Michael Goldman Comments on ICC Cup, Evolution of International Soccer

USF Prof Michael Goldman Comments on ICC Cup, Evolution of International Soccer | USF in the News | Scoop.it

 

“This is an evolution,” said Reyna, the sporting director for New York City FC, the group’s MLS affiliate.

 

“We’re already thinking ahead. We’re looking at what the football landscape’s going to be like in two or three years — globally, domestically in each of our leagues — and how we can get ahead of the competition.”

 

It’s part of a multibillion-dollar investment by City’s Abu Dhabi-based owners. And some of what that spending has bought will be on display Wednesday when Manchester City meets Real Madrid, winner of the last two Champions League crowns, in an exhibition at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

 

A crowd of more than 75,000 is expected for the 8 p.m. kickoff, according to event organizers.

 

Expanding payrolls and spiraling expenses have long required European teams to make summer barnstorming tours of the U.S. and Asia, where they briefly plant their flag, glad-hand some sponsors and pick up a few oversize checks. But lately even that hasn’t been enough to make ends meet.

...

“CFG’s strategy contributes to the growth of the game, although I suspect the company's main goal is to deliver strategic and financial returns to their shareholders,” said Michael Goldman, an assistant professor in the sport management program at the University of San Francisco. “CFG’s approach is to integrate football, marketing, media, commercial, training and medical care across their subsidiaries, in order to provide these returns.”

 

[via Los Angeles Times]

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“What If Education Enabled People To Analyze Possibilities” Dr. Shabnam Koirala-Azad Interviewed in Spotlight Nepal

“What If Education Enabled People To Analyze Possibilities”  Dr. Shabnam Koirala-Azad Interviewed in Spotlight Nepal | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Dr. Shabnam Koirala-Azad, the first Nepali-American woman dean of an American university talked with DEEPAK RAJ JOSHI of New Spotlight about her education, career, experience and home country. 

 

[via spotlightnepal.com]

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USF Prof James Taylor Gives His Take on Spicer Resignation, Appointment of Scaramucci 

"This was a protest -- he quit because he didn't agree with this. He even verbalized that this was a mistake that the President was making. Brining a New York Wall Street Guy -- another billionaire -- as the face of the administration."

 

[via KTVU News]

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USF Alum Bradley Zimmer Succeeds by Being Himself With Indians

USF Alum Bradley Zimmer Succeeds by Being Himself With Indians | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Two months into his big-league career, Cleveland’s Bradley Zimmer has learned one key adjustment to playing in the majors: avoid the temptation of making wholesale adjustments.

 

“I just had to realize what got me here is plenty,” Zimmer said in the visiting clubhouse at the Coliseum on Sunday, “and not try to be someone who I’m not.”

 

Zimmer is a 6-foot-5, 220-pound outfielder from USF who hits left-handed and throws right-handed. He’s batting .265 with five homers in 162 at-bats. He has stolen 10 bases in 11 attempts. 

 

The Indians’ 2014 first-round pick received “who you are is plenty good enough” advice during his freshman season with the Dons from head coach Nino Giarratano.

 

“I heard him say a bunch of times, ‘Just be Bradley Zimmer.’ I think I put a little bit of pressure on myself my first year, trying to do a little too much,” Zimmer said.

 

After hitting .242 with no homers as a freshman, Zimmer improved to .320 with seven home runs as a sophomore and .368 and another seven long balls as a junior.

 

...

Zimmer put himself on the major-league highlight reels July 1 in a doubleheader at Detroit. In the opener, he raced into right-center to make a diving grab of a Mikie Mahtook liner. In the second game, Zimmer robbed Mahtook again, this time with a full-extension, backhanded catch in deep left-center.

 

...

Zimmer played one season at USF with his brother Kyle, a pitcher whom the Royals selected in the first round in 2012. Injuries have sidetracked Kyle’s pro career — he has a 7.52 ERA in 11 outings with Triple-A Omaha this season — but he remains one of his younger brother’s biggest backers.

 

Bradley said that Kyle has been “awesome. He’s extremely happy for me.”

 

The three games in Oakland certainly didn’t make Bradley happy. Not only did Cleveland get swept, but also he went 0-for-6 with four strikeouts (and two walks). He was 0-for-5 with a run scored Monday.

 

Chalk up this stretch to Bradley Zimmer’s continuing education at the big-league level.

 

“The game’s a little quicker and there are a lot more people here,” he said. “Control your breath and have fun. It’s the same game.”

 

[via San Francisco Chronicle]

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USF Featured on U.S. News & World Report's 'Colleges That Give Merit Aid to the Most Students' List

USF Featured on U.S. News & World Report's 'Colleges That Give Merit Aid to the Most Students' List | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Merit scholarships can lessen the burden of college tuition for families that do not qualify for need-based aid. In order to win these scholarships, students must either have outstanding academic accomplishments, such as high grades and test scores, or impressive extracurricular activities.

...

At each of the 10 colleges where merit scholarships are awarded to the most students, more than 40 percent of full-time students in fall 2015 received merit awards without qualifying for need-based aid, according to data submitted to U.S. News in an annual survey. These colleges gave merit aid at a much higher rate than the average among the 1,100 ranked colleges that reported these data: 14.1 percent.

 

[via usnews.com]

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USF Prof Bill Hing Reflects on Loss of Human Rights Activist, Nobel Laureate Liu Xiaobo

USF Prof Bill Hing Reflects on Loss of Human Rights Activist, Nobel Laureate Liu Xiaobo | USF in the News | Scoop.it

World leaders and human rights advocates expressed sorrow and anger Thursday over the death of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, who died in police custody while being treated for advanced liver cancer in prison.

 

They also condemned the Chinese government for refusing the political prisoner’s wish to travel overseas for treatment. U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was among those urging the Chinese government to release Liu’s wife from house arrest and to leave the country.

 

Liu, 61, was a literary critic and writer who came to prominence in 1989 after he encouraged pro-democracy students to leave Beijing’s Tiananmen Square rather than face down armed soldiers. Liu was imprisoned four times, the most recently for co-writing a document circulated in 2008 that called for more freedom of expression, human rights and an independent judiciary in China.

 

He was in prison when the Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded him the Peace Prize in 2010 for his “long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China.”

...

University of San Francisco law professor and immigrant rights’ advocate Bill Ong Hing said it was tragic to lose such a widely-admired figure. Hing’s father immigrated to the U.S. from China.

 

“The fact is he was not free to do and say and appear where he wanted. It’s a stark reminder of the constraints that people in China have who are critical of the government,” he said.

 

[via The Washington Post]

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Appointment of USF School of Education Dean Featured in Catholic San Francisco 

Appointment of USF School of Education Dean Featured in Catholic San Francisco  | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The University of San Francisco has announced Shabnam Koirala-Azad as dean of the USF School of Education. Koirala-Azad has been interim dean since January 2017 and “a leading academic” at the school of education since 2005, USF said in a statement.

 

Koirala-Azad, born and raised in Nepal, is the first woman to serve as dean of the USF School of Education since its founding in 1947. She holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in education and teaching from Mount Holyoke College and graduate and doctoral degrees from UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Education.

 

Koirala-Azad will oversee more than 20 credential, master and doctoral programs, USF said. “Dean Koirala-Azad is an inspiring female, immigrant voice and an expert on a broad range of global and national education issues. She founded USF’s human rights master’s program in education, the first in the country, and offers both a personal and professional perspective on international and U.S.-based development programs, including Teach for America.”

 

[via catholic-sf.org]

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Prof Aaron Tapper explains how giving back is part of the Jewish-American identity in Times of Israel

Prof Aaron Tapper explains how giving back is part of the Jewish-American identity in Times of Israel | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Turned off by prayer and ritual, some young Jews find an unexpected connection to tradition in social justice.

....

"The idea of giving back and improving society is an important part of Jewish-American identity," said Aaron Hahn Tapper, the founding director of the Swig Program in Jewish Studies and Social Justice at the University of San Francisco.

 

‘Keeping kosher had no meaning to me. But this social justice community — that means something’

 

Though different terms — such as service learning, social justice and “tikkun olam” — have gained favor at different times to describe work done by groups such as Repair the World, “these ideas have been pretty central to Jewish-American identities for some time, for decades,” Tapper said.

 

via @timesofisrael

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Don Heller weighs in on 6 Last-Minute Strategies to Pay for College

Don Heller weighs in on 6 Last-Minute Strategies to Pay for College | USF in the News | Scoop.it

With college classes starting soon, ideally you've made all your payments and are ready to settle in. But if you're still looking for financial aid to help cover your tuition, you'll have to move fast. Here are six strategies recommended by people who specialize in college admissions.

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USF Prof Lara Bazelon Explains Why Colleges Should Change How They Handle Sexual Assault in Washington Post Op-Ed

USF Prof Lara Bazelon Explains Why Colleges Should Change How They Handle Sexual Assault in Washington Post Op-Ed | USF in the News | Scoop.it

This month, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos signaled that her department will likely revise an Obama administration policy on how colleges and universities handle campus sexual assaults.

 

DeVos, who observed that “a system without due process ultimately serves no one in the end,” is right to address this topic. And she has her work cut out for her. The rhetoric that dominates the debate often obscures the notion of ensuring fundamental fairness — to both sides — when adjudicating a sexual assault accusation.

 ...
 
[via The Washington Post]
 
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USF Professor Anthony Ribera Explains How Police Can Use Social Media to Their Advantage

"A lot of people who engage in criminal conduct feel they're never going to be caught. Eventually, their luck will run out -- especially if they're sharing information."

 

[via KTVU News}

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As Companies Adjust to the Sharing Economy, USF Law Prof Tim Iglesias Outlines How Regulators Can Catch Up

As Companies Adjust to the Sharing Economy, USF Law Prof Tim Iglesias Outlines How Regulators Can Catch Up | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The emergence of pet-sitting apps like DogVacay.com has spurred the city of New York to enforce obscure regulations requiring home pet-sitters to get licenses to board animals.

...

More than a quarter of all workers in the US require some kind of professional licensing, the Brookings Institution has noted. “These regulations serve to increase prices (by reducing supply) and — on average — have only a limited or no measurable effect on quality,” said Schleicher, who noted that licensing rules also make it harder for workers to move from state to state.

 

There has been growing opposition to occupational licensing requirements over the past 10-15 years by groups like the libertarian Institute for Justice, according to Tim Iglesias, a professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law. The Institute for Justice, in particular, argues that licensing rules burden low-income workers and aspiring entrepreneurs. Back in 2012, the Institute for Justice examined the licensing requirements for 102 low- and moderate-income jobs like barber and massage therapist and found that on average workers had to pay $200 and complete nine months in education and training just to get their license.

 

While licenses for some professions might be necessary, one could argue that you might not need a license to watch somebody’s dog in your home. Iglesias noted that it’s ridiculous to require somebody to complete training to watch animals in their home “unless they’re really special animals.”

 

[via Yahoo Finance]

 

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USF Prof Nola Agha Explains How Minor League Teams are Having a Major Impact on Local Economies 

USF Prof Nola Agha Explains How Minor League Teams are Having a Major Impact on Local Economies  | USF in the News | Scoop.it

I was at an academic conference last year in Las Vegas. As I waited for the next presentation to begin, I talked to Nola Agha, a professor of sport management at the University of San Francisco. She asked where I was from and I replied “Augusta, Georgia.” To my surprise, she replied, “That’s the home of the GreenJackets minor league baseball team.”

 

How did someone from California know about the GreenJackets? Maybe it was because they are an affiliate of the San Francisco Giants and Agha was a baseball fan?

 

Turns out, Dr. Agha knew about the GreenJackets because she has spent much of the past few years studying the impact of minor league baseball teams on their local economy.

 

Eighty-five percent of economists agree that local and state governments should eliminate subsidies to professional sport franchises because studies have shown major league sports teams have no impact on their economy. What Agha was the first to do is look at minor league, not major league, teams.

 

She found that the presence of a AAA or A+ minor league team increased per-capita income by $67 to $118 per year. Affiliated minor league teams in a city also increase rents by 6 to 8 percent. This is in direct contrast to major league sports.

 

So why are the results different? One suggestion is that major league teams often are located in large cities, so discerning the effect of a team is difficult given all the other economic activity. Minor league teams are in smaller, more isolated, cities, and so may affect their communities more.

 

Agha also states that new stadiums are more likely to affect income if they are associated with other development, have a high degree of utilization and drive new visitor spending.

 

[via The Augusta Chronicle]

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Improving the Student-Athlete Experience: How USF is Using Analytics to Reduce Injuries and Keep Players Healthier  

Improving the Student-Athlete Experience: How USF is Using Analytics to Reduce Injuries and Keep Players Healthier   | USF in the News | Scoop.it
 

Sparta Science tracks athletes making six jumps in 90 seconds with its force plate technology and proprietary software to predict what injuries they’re in danger of suffering, what workouts they need to stay healthy and what sport or position best suits their athletic ability.

 

“People ask how can you tell this from a 90-second jump,” Wagner said. “But it’s more like an iceberg. You see the top, which is the jump. But under the water is reams and reams of data points of the individual’s history, ethnicity and demographics and that tells a whole story.”

...

The University of San Francisco was an early adapter and has been impressed by the results. USF’s medical insurance claims for athletes have dropped significantly since hiring Sparta, from $424,580 in 2011-12 to $168,567 in 2015-16, according to Doug Padron, the school’s associate athletic director for sports administration and performance.

 

The reduction in injuries has lowered the school’s insurance premiums, allowing for more money to be spent on increasing staff and resources for the athletes. The school trusts the data so much that it advised one pitcher to skip the Cape Cod summer league because tests showed he was susceptible to an elbow injury. After training all summer, the pitcher stayed healthy and was drafted into the majors.

 

“Our student athletes are having a great experience because they’re healthy,” Padron said. “I don’t know why others wouldn’t do it. Analytics are everywhere. I don’t think there’s a better thing to spend money on than the student-athlete experience.”

 

[via Associated Press]

 

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USF Prof James Taylor Comments on Kushner Testimony, Personnel Changes in White House, and Healthcare Developments on the Hill

"[Kushner] is lawyered-up and not under sworn oath. He can say whatever he wants. You still can't lie to congress, even if you're not under oath,  so he has to be careful of that, but I don't think he's going to be telling us anything that we don't already know.

...

This is part of a perfunctory, necessary process to make the American people feel like Congress is doing it's job. It's oversight, and you have to respect what they're doing. I think the idea that both parties have come together in a bipartisan way around sanctions on Russia is a whole another reality for Trump and his administration that we have to talk about."

 

[via KTVU News]

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O.J. Simpson Granted Parole: USF Law Professor Robert Talbot Explains What Led to the Verdict

"He has the rest of his life to live. If he convinces the TV audience that he really wasn't guilty of that robbery and kidnapping as he was found guilty by the jury, it could make it easier for him..."

 

[via ABC 7 News]

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USF Prof Bill Goldman Remembered by Friends and Family as Accomplished Scholar, Beloved Teacher, and Valued Member of Community

USF Prof Bill Goldman Remembered by Friends and Family as Accomplished Scholar, Beloved Teacher, and Valued Member of Community | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In the hours after William Sachs Goldman died in a small plane crash that also injured his two children and their nanny, he was widely remembered as much more than just the grandson of prominent San Francisco philanthropists.

 

To friends, the 38-year-old was just Bill. Bill, the brilliant scholar who held a doctorate in European history from UC Berkeley. Bill, the assistant professor who livened up staff meetings at the University of San Francisco with his garrulous laugh. And Bill the pilot who loved flying his private five-seater plane, sometimes for Angel Flight West, a charity that transports critically ill patients.

...

USF President Paul Fitzgerald praised Goldman as an “accomplished scholar, a beloved and generous teacher, and a valued member of our community.”

 

“He will be greatly missed by his colleagues, students and the countless alumni who were inspired by him in and out of the classroom,” Fitzgerald said in a statement about Goldman, who was an assistant professor in international studies at the university.

 

Elliot Neaman, a professor of history at USF, said Goldman was a “sweet man” who never alluded to his privileged upbringing.

...

Thomas Dandelet, a professor at UC Berkeley and Goldman’s dissertation adviser, remembered his former pupil as an optimist who had a zest for life. The two would often chat over large lunches, or a glass of wine in the evening. They attended historical conferences together in Spain and Italy. Dandelet went to Goldman’s wedding and frequently saw his children, George and Marie. It was a long friendship that went back to 2003, he said.

 

...

“I never heard a bitter thing come out of his mouth, which is pretty rare in my profession,” he said. “He’s good-natured and generous. He always understood how much good fortune he had.”

 

Daniel Sokatch, a CEO for the New Israel Fund, a nonprofit supporting democracy and civil rights in Israel, also mourned Goldman, who served on the organization’s board of directors.

 

“His vision, idealism, and sharp sense of humor sustained us all,” Sokatch said in a statement Friday. “Our thoughts are with his family, and especially his children. As we begin to process this loss, we know that his memory will be a blessing, as was his life.”

 

[via SFGate]

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USF Alum Josh Binder Featured on Billboard's 2017 Top Music Lawyers

USF Alum Josh Binder Featured on Billboard's 2017 Top Music Lawyers | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Binder represents Top Dawg Entertainment, home to Kendrick LamarScHoolboy Q and SZA, among others, and also counts MarshmelloCam and Daddy Yankee among his clients.

 

The latest project for the Los Angeles native was fielding the "intricacies" of release plans and juggling tour sponsorships for Lamar’s third major-label album, DAMN.

 

Lamar "just f*cking works his ass off," says Binder, "and it’s a testament to him and the Top Dawg crew around him. That separates their success from the rest of the business."

 

[via Billboard.com]

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Now Back in the Bay, USF Alum Clare Vivier Brings Handbag Haven to Hayes Valley

Now Back in the Bay, USF Alum Clare Vivier Brings Handbag Haven to Hayes Valley | USF in the News | Scoop.it

“It’s a homecoming of sorts,” says Clare Vivier of her first San Francisco shop, which opened in Hayes Valley last month. Vivier, who runs the handbag-heavy fashion empire Clare V. in Los Angeles, called San Francisco home for 12 years after moving here from her native Minnesota in 1989 to study English at the University of San Francisco. “I had never been to California before I moved for college,” she says. “What I knew about San Francisco was that it was metropolitan, but not as big as Los Angeles and New York. It seemed manageable.”

 

In little time, she fell in love with her newfound home, the characters in it and its vibrant early ’90s nightlife. From 1991-1993 she made her first foray into retail with the now-shuttered Haight Street shop Behind the Post Office, which she ran with her then-boyfriend Stephen Pringle. The duo, who later broke up, organized numerous nightclub parties on behalf of the brand.

 

Vivier moved to Los Angeles in 2001 (for her current husband’s job in French broadcast journalism), and formally launched her eponymous company onto the wholesale market in 2008. But S.F. never fully left her mind. “We’ve always wanted to open in San Francisco, and especially through our e-commerce, we know we have a large customer base here,” she says.

 

Now that dream is a reality, with an open and airy Clare V. boutique at 344 Linden St., just off the main strip in Hayes Valley. Designed by Kate McCollough, who has worked on three other Vivier stores, as well as shops for Phillip Lim, Tory Burch and Goop, the space features an A-frame silhouette, generous skylights, a blush pink concrete floor, plush window seating, modern lighting fixtures by Lambert & Fils, vintage European midcentury pieces, and original wallpaper in the dressing rooms that give a wink to Vivier’s S.F. past.

 

[via San Francisco Chronicle]

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