USF in the News
66.9K views | +7 today
Follow
 
Scoop.it!

KCBS Radio News: Lack of Diversity in Tech Industry

KCBS Radio News: Lack of Diversity in Tech Industry | USF in the News | Scoop.it

KCBS Radio reports on the Rev. Jesse Jackson's visit to the Hewlett Packard annual shareholders meeting to bring attention to Silicon Valley's poor record of including blacks and Latinos in hiring, board appointments and startup funding.


USF's Vice Provost Mary Wardell-Ghiraraduzzi spoke with KCBS Radio News about Jackson's strategy and why people of color need to be part of the booming tech industry.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Mary J. Wardell-Ghirarduzzi has been working in various roles in higher education administration for the past 18 years and is currently part of leadership at the University of San Francisco. Working with faculty, staff and students, and diverse communities through the San Francisco Bay area, she promotes an understanding of diversity as core to a holistic and sustainable higher education organization. 

more...
No comment yet.
USF in the News
USF in the News
News and mentions of the University of San Francisco
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

Two Years Ago USF Made A Plan to Diversify its Chinese Student Body -- And its Working 

Two Years Ago USF Made A Plan to Diversify its Chinese Student Body -- And its Working  | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Two years ago, the University of San Francisco announced a plan to admit some students from China without SAT scores, without TOEFL scores and without any of the standard tools used to evaluate international applicants.

 

The private Jesuit university didn't lack for Chinese students admitted with those tools, enrolling about 1,000. But officials wondered if they might attract 5 to 10 top students each year from China using a new approach. The university made it possible for Chinese students to apply based on the gaokao, the rigorous multiple-day test used for admission to Chinese universities, plus an in-person interview in English, conducted in China by university faculty members, as part of the university's own English-language proficiency test. (The gaokao includes a foreign language section on which most students take English, so the test score is already an indication of language skill, even before the interview.)

...

So far, San Francisco is exceeding its goals for admitting students via gaokao -- and the students admitted this way are doing well academically. In the fall of 2015, 17 new students enrolled this way, and another 16 did so in the fall of 2016. So far, academic performance is strong, with both cohorts having grade-point averages above 3.2.

...

Donald E. Heller, provost at the university, stressed in an interview that the idea behind the program is not to push for a massive increase in the number of Chinese students, but to go after top students who might not otherwise enroll. The students who appear to be enrolling now are those who had top grades in rigorous high school programs and were planning to go to one of the top universities in China, where getting in isn't much easier than getting into an Ivy in the U.S. When they don't get into the very top Chinese universities, they are open to options in the United States, especially if they don't need to wait for the next chance to take the SAT or TOEFL.

 

[via insidehighered.com]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

USF Prof Validates Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom's Statement on Gun Violence  

USF Prof Validates Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom's Statement on Gun Violence   | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Gun control is a top priority for California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom.

 

So, it’s no surprise Newsom, a Democrat and 2018 candidate for governor, promoted the cause on National Gun Violence Awareness Day.

 

He claimed in a statement on Twitter on June 2, 2017:

 

"Americans are 25x more likely to be shot & killed than others in developed countries. We've had enough. #NationalGunViolenceAwarenessDay." 

...

To back up the statement, Newsom’s campaign spokesman pointed to a study published in the American Journal of Medicine in March 2016 called "Violent Death Rates: The US Compared with Other High-income OECD Countries, 2010."

...

We contacted the co-authors of this study. Both described Newsom’s claim as "accurate."

 

"Yes, what he said seems accurate," David Hemenway, professor of health policy at the Harvard School of Public Health and co-author, said by email. "I think anyone who looks at the data would agree."

 

Erin Grinshteyn, an assistant professor of health policy at the University of San Francisco and the other co-author, also said the claim was correct.

 

Grinshteyn described the report as "purely an academic study."

 

She said her portion of the work was not funded while Hemenway’s participation was funded, in part, by the Joyce Foundation.

 

[via politifact.com]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Did President Trump Obstruct Justice? USF Prof James Taylor Offers His Take on KTVU After Comey Hearing 

"Russia is now almost secondary and irrelevant to Donald Trump. This is now about obstruction of justice. This is where Richard Nixon's conduct in Watergate as it relates to tapes echoes with what is happening today... When Richard Nixon refused to release the tapes once they were discovered, the consequence was that they subpoenaed the tapes. When Nixon refused that's when articles of impeachment were moved and he resigned from office."

 

[via KTVU News]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

USF Law Prof Bill Hing Says Federal Appeals Court Ruling on Travel Ban is Strong

USF Law Prof Bill Hing Says Federal Appeals Court Ruling on Travel Ban is Strong | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The second federal appeals court to consider President Trump’s travel ban against selected mostly Muslim nations reached the same result as the first — that the ban cannot take effect — but for reasons that struck at the heart of Trump’s national-security argument and could lessen his chances of prevailing in the U.S. Supreme Court.

 

In a 3-0 ruling Monday, the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco said the president had offered no evidence that temporarily barring immigrants and visitors from the targeted nations, as well as all would-be refugees, would protect the United States from terrorism.

...

Because Trump’s actions appear to be illegal, the court said, there is no need to decide whether they would also be unconstitutional.

 

Bill Ong Hing, a University of San Francisco law professor and director of the school’s Immigration Law and Deportation Defense Clinic, said the Ninth Circuit’s reliance on federal laws is more likely to persuade Supreme Court justices than citing campaign comments as evidence of a discriminatory intent.

 

“I’ve always thought that statutory grounds was stronger from the plaintiffs’ perspective ... (that) he’s going beyond the statute by saying everyone from those countries presents a danger,” Hing said. “He doesn’t have a factual basis for that conclusion.”

...

 

[via @sfchronicle.com]

University of San Francisco's insight:

#USFLaw Prof Bill Hing says Federal Appeals Court ruling on #travelban is strong #immigration @egelko @sfchronicle  http://bit.ly/2rmJrF4 

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

USF Adjunct Prof Curtis Buzanski Discusses California's Opiate Crisis and the Stigma Surrounding Addiction on KCRA 3 News

"A lot of opiate addicts feel normal when they take them for the first time -- not high. It's a feeling they've always wanted, and as the addiction potential builds, it gets out of control" Buzanski explained. "There's a lot of shame and stigma around addiction as a whole. People still think that addiction is a character flaw and not a disease. As more people come to understand that it's a disease that's treatable, more people can come out and ask for help."

 

[via KCRA 3 News]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

USF Law Dean John Trasviña Comments on Trump's Credibility Contest in San Francisco Chronicle

USF Law Dean John Trasviña Comments on Trump's Credibility Contest in San Francisco Chronicle | USF in the News | Scoop.it

....

Some political analysts said Comey’s words were likely to carry more weight than even a nonpartisan fact-checking operation such as PolitiFact. The Pulitzer Prize-winning site has found that 71 percent of the Trump statements it has examined have been “mostly false,” “false,” or “pants on fire.”

 

But hearing the former head of the FBI say it during an internationally watched hearing codifies that image of Trump into the public’s mind — and some of that may leach into the minds of his most devout supporters.

 

“It’s not a member of the mainstream media (saying it). It’s not another politician. It’s the (former) head of the FBI,” said John Trasviña, who was general counsel for the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution in the 1990s and now is dean of the University of San Francisco Law School.

 

“It’s harder to dismiss law enforcement,” Trasviña said. “There are people in other parts of the country who are totally inclined to believe law enforcement — they are still respected institutions.”

 

And that’s even considering Comey’s checkered reputation among partisans — particularly some Democrats who thought he bungled announcements, just days before the November election, around the investigation involving Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server.

 

“Comey’s no angel, he’s not perfect,” Trasviña said. “But if you have two people in the room — him and Trump — people will choose Comey.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

‘Beechnut’ by USF Visiting Poet, Arisa White, Featured in SF Chronicle

‘Beechnut’ by USF Visiting Poet, Arisa White, Featured in SF Chronicle | USF in the News | Scoop.it

How does the poet describe such inscrutable feelings with words, while also avoiding shopworn phrases from all the great love poems of the past? (Shakespeare alone seems to have cornered the market.) Specificity helps — of image, sensation and place. The beechnut tree in this poem [entitled "Beechnut"] is the tool Arisa White needs to describe her feelings. ...

 

[via @sfchronicle]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Ken Goldstein, USF Prof, Comments on Media Spending on Ossoff and Combative GA Special Election I

Ken Goldstein, USF Prof, Comments on Media Spending on Ossoff and Combative GA Special Election I | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Media outlets in Georgia are cashing in on a contentious special congressional election in the Atlanta suburbs. A runoff between Republican Karen Handel and Democrat Jon Ossoff has become a referendum on President Trump and, with weeks until the June 20 vote, the race is already generating big-time ad spending, according to a story on NPR’s “Morning Edition.”

 

Given that this was supposed to be an off year for political advertising, Tim McVay, GM of Atlanta ABC affiliate WSB-TV, told NPR, “We did not see that coming.”

 

Added Ken Goldstein, a professor at the University of San Francisco, “Can you quote me as being, like my mouth wide open? That’s just manna from heaven for [stations].” In fact, this has already become the most expensive race for a U.S. House seat ever.

 

So far, the candidates and outside groups are on track to spend at least $30 million on TV ads, while radio is also a focal part of the campaign. Amazingly, NPR points out that that’s more than one-third of the roughly $75 million President Trump’s campaign spent on ads during the nationwide general election. Republicans have controlled the seat for nearly 40 years, but recently, Tom Price left to take over as secretary of Health and Human Services.

 

[via insideradio.com]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Kathleen Radecke, USF School of Ed Grad, Named Superintendent of Oakland Catholic Schools

Kathleen M. Radecke '85, former superintendent of the Diocese of Monterey's Catholic schools, has been appointed superintendent of schools for the Diocese of Oakland effective July 1.

...

Radecke was graduated from the University of San Francisco with a master's degree in Catholic School Administration, and with a bachelor's degree in Speech Communication and a Multiple Subject Teaching Credential from California State University in Hayward, and a Master Catechist Certificate from the Oakland Diocese. She was also principal at St.Perpetua School in Lafayette, and taught at St. Philip Neri, Holy Spirit and Moreau Catholic High School.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

$1 Million Pledge to University of San Francisco Establishes New Scholarships for East Bay Students

Anonymous donor to support African-American and Latino students from the East Bay with 10, 4-year scholarships to the University of San Francisco.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Shoresh Alaudini, USF Grad, noted in SF Chronicle as ‘Beach Blanket Babylon’ scholarship celebrates 15 years

Shoresh Alaudini, USF Grad, noted in SF Chronicle as ‘Beach Blanket Babylon’ scholarship celebrates 15 years | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Behind the big hats and campy extravagance, the esteemed reputation of “Beach Blanket Babylon,” regarded as the world’s longest-running musical revue, deserves to be superseded perhaps only by its Scholarship for the Arts program.

 

While the famed “Babylon” has paraded a stream of outlandish characters in North Beach for 43 years, the Steve Silver Foundation, named after the show’s late founder, enters its 15th year offering $15,000 scholarships to three talented Bay Area high school seniors.

 

Shoresh Alaudini, who won for acting in the scholarship’s inaugural year, remembers his college adviser, coincidentally the head of the performing arts department at the University of San Francisco, doggedly roping him into acting classes while Alaudini was still hesitant about pursuing performance.

 

“So I mention (winning), and he reaches into his desk and pulls out a newspaper clipping of the scholarship and he’s like, ‘We’ve been waiting for you,’” Alaudini says. Alaudini has remained in the Bay Area working as a now-seasoned stage actor.

 

Started in 2002, the scholarship program is an extension of the foundation’s commitment to giving back to the city.

 

 

The program is ultimately a concerted effort to provide, along with the financial support, a sense of affirmation and support for teenagers considering careers that demand uncertainty and vulnerability (though the scholarship doesn’t require an art major).

 

...

“The fact that they do what they do, and as I get older and see what’s going on with the constant influx and the struggle of funding for the arts — it’s amazing,” says Alaudini. “Words really can’t describe what this opportunity meant for me.”

 

[@brandonyu @SFChronicle]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Stymied at Grant Elementary, Lowell and USF Graduations on First Go-Round: Mark Buell, Civic Leader Made USF SOM Graduation Saturday  

Stymied at Grant Elementary, Lowell and USF Graduations on First Go-Round: Mark Buell, Civic Leader Made USF SOM Graduation Saturday   | USF in the News | Scoop.it

If at first you don’t succeed ... Civic leader Mark Buell, graduation speaker at the University of San Francisco on Saturday, May 20, revealed that before attending USF, he’d attended Grant Elementary and Lowell High schools. He had not attended graduation ceremonies for any of them.

 

A learning disability put him in a Grant Elementary classroom taking graduation qualification tests during rites there; a summer job aboard a passenger ship to Asia meant that he’d left town a week before the Lowell graduation. And he was drafted into the Army six weeks before his college graduation ceremonies.

 

His speech included special thanks to the evening-school dean who had allowed him — because of his disability — to waive the language requirement in lieu of young Buell taking 12 units of theology. After for that, he said, “muchas gracias.”

 

[via sfchronicle.com]

more...
Sathi Hd's comment, May 25, 1:34 PM
Online Shopping in Bangladesh,
http://www.ecabbd.com/
Scoop.it!

NPR Marketplace Explores 3-Year Degree Option at Colleges Including USF and NYU

NPR Marketplace Explores 3-Year Degree Option at Colleges Including USF and NYU | USF in the News | Scoop.it

That's a year's worth of tuition saved. But something may be lost as well...

 

[via marketplace.org]

more...
Sathi Hd's comment, May 25, 1:38 PM
Online Shopping in Bangladesh,
https://goo.gl/qPAey7
Scoop.it!

"What Trump Could Learn from the Warriors:" SF Prof Bruce Wydick Explains in SF Chronicle Opinion Piece

"What Trump Could Learn from the Warriors:" SF Prof Bruce Wydick Explains in SF Chronicle Opinion Piece | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Both have faced challenges in their own spheres, the complexities of 21st century global politics and the quest for an NBA championship, respectively. [...] consider how their different understanding of competition and cooperation have influenced the way they have engaged their respective challenges — and how these different approaches have influenced their degree of success.

...

To obtain lucrative individual contracts, NBA players are understandably concerned with “putting up good numbers” before their next salary negotiation. There is more joy among the Warriors from a sneaky pass to a teammate than in individual scoring records. [...] rather than perceiving the mutual gains from cooperation with other countries in areas such as international trade and global environmental issues, Trump pledged to put America first, a pledge consistent with a zero-sum understanding of the world.

 

The undertakings of previous U.S. presidents, such as the signing of the Paris climate agreement, the U.N. Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, the NATO alliance and various international economic treaties have partially restrained American self-interest to collectively benefit the global community. [...] even if he had, consider how different a group of talented but self-interested players would have looked from the athletic harmony in motion we witnessed in the postseason.

 

http://bit.ly/2sy3mQR

 

[via sfgate.com]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

USF's San Francisco Advantage Stronger Than Fear of Trump for International Students

USF's San Francisco Advantage Stronger Than Fear of Trump for International Students | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Fears that Donald Trump’s election would drive a decline in the number of international students who want to study at American universities appear to be overblown, at least in the Bay Area.

...

“Silicon Valley has a lot of job opportunities in my field,” said Shraddha Lanka, who came from India for a master’s in health informatics at the University of San Francisco and said she would make the same choice again.

 

Some of her friends in places like Texas and Georgia have faced discrimination since the election. “For me, it’s not been like that at all,” she said. “It’s almost like we’ve come to two different Americas.”

 

Now, when she talks to worried friends and family back home, she encourages people to apply to local schools. “I always tell them, if you have the option, come to the Bay Area,” she said.

 

[via mercurynews.com]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

USF Law Dean John Trasviña Provides Post-Hearing Analysis of Comey Testimony on KRON 4 News

"We had two big bombshells. One is the former Director of the FBI calling the President a liar and not having any Senators stand up and say no, you're wrong. Second, is on the issue of Russia meddling in our election. This hearing is going to lead to a lot more investigation -- not just of the underlying incidents."

 

[via KRON 4 News]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

USF Prof Thomas Maier Teaches Leadership Through the Inspiring Story of Mario Andretti

USF Prof Thomas Maier Teaches Leadership Through the Inspiring Story of Mario Andretti | USF in the News | Scoop.it

“I thought it would be a good academic case study to tell the story of Mario through the lens of leadership and inspiration and also talk about his legacy with his son and grandson,” Maier said. “His story as an immigrant offers such a promise and hope and dream for so many people. It’s a wonderful story.”

 
[via autoweek.com]
more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

USF Law Dean John Trasviña Discusses Comey Testimony on KRON 4 News

"This is going to be the mother of all hearings" commented USF Law Dean John Trasviña. "James Comey is a great storyteller -- he will put the American people at that dinner where he and President Trump were by themselves... Now we're going to be able to see and hear what actually occurred."

 

[via KRON 4 News]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

USF Adjunct Prof Highlights Importance of Diversity in Tech

USF Adjunct Prof Highlights Importance of Diversity in Tech | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The specialty school, started by two tech entrepreneurs, has no upfront tuition and provides job opportunities in Silicon Valley industries looking for talent.

...

“I was attracted to Holberton because my school is also about social justice and teaching populations that are frozen out of the information age, meaning people of color, women and people who are not wealthy,” said Vito Ferrante, a director of educational technology at Sacred Heart Cathedral Preparatory in San Francisco and an adjunct professor in the education department at the University of San Francisco."

 

“There are challenges for this model in that Holberton is fighting the traditional higher education model, which will be difficult to dismantle at best,” Mr. Ferrante said. “But Holberton’s model, where teachers are guides, is becoming more common. More and more schools are understanding that teaching is really about teaching critical thinking, especially in the information age, which moves very quickly.”

 

[via nytimes.com]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

ABC7 News: Student and US Navy Veteran, Joe DeLaurentis Comments on Service, the GI Bill and Being a Student at USF

USFCA student and US Navy veteran Joe DeLaurentis is interviewed by ABC7 on his experience in the Navy, the GI Bill and getting his BA in international business at USF.

 

[via @ABC7News]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Campbell Elementary District Names USF School of Ed Ph.D. Shelly Viramontez as Superintendent

Shelly Viramontez has been named superintendent of the Campbell Union School District. She will succeed Eric Andrew, who is retiring at the end of June.

...

Viramontez earned education and administrative credentials from Santa Clara University and San Jose State University, a master’s in special education from San Jose State and a doctorate in organization and leadership from the University of San Francisco.

 

The Campbell district serves more than 7,500 students in preschools, nine elementary schools, three middle schools and a home school program in parts of six cities in Santa Clara County.

 

[via@mercnews]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

USF Alum Gives Advice to High School Grads: There's More than One Path to Success

USF Alum Gives Advice to High School Grads: There's More than One Path to Success | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Every spring at Gunn High School, graduating seniors adhere to a tradition: posting college rejection letters on what has been dubbed the "wall of rejection" on the quad.

 

In 2008, Shounak Dharap's senior year, someone posted a fake rejection letter from Foothill College — a joke because no one gets rejected from the community college, and besides, he said, "Who would even go to Foothill?"

 

The perceived stigma of attending a community college stuck with him for years, as it has for many graduates of the Palo Alto Unified School District, where the vast majority of students go on to attend four-year colleges and universities and many alumni describe a deeply entrenched culture of competition and impossibly high standards.

 

After Dharap didn't get into any of the colleges he applied to, he decided to attend Santa Barbara City College for two years.

 

"It was a really rough two years for me going there just because (of) the shame of it all. Coming from Gunn, it was very hard to look people in the eyes that I went to school with and tell them I went to community college," he said in an interview with the Weekly. "It shouldn't be."

 

Dharap, now a lawyer in San Francisco, is among many Gunn and Paly alumni of all ages who have come to appreciate the more circuitous routes they took after high school. Together, their experiences tell the story of another Palo Alto: one that deviates, happily, from the cookie-cutter path that many high school students feel is expected of them after graduation.

 

The Weekly solicited these stories to coincide with graduation, with the goal of sharing real-life examples of Palo Altans who found success, happiness and purpose by making non-traditional choices after high school. The number of Palo Alto high school alumni who responded to a request the Weekly posted on Facebook indicates that these stories may be lesser known but are more prevalent than one would think.

 

Shounak Dharap

Dharap enjoyed high school. He had fun, made a lot of friends and enjoyed "side projects" like video production and cooking. But school itself didn't click with him, he said. He floundered academically.

 

"It was sort of like high school was a marathon, and I'm really more of a swimmer," he said.

 

Despite this, he tried to keep up. He took all the classes his friends were taking but did poorly.

 

He applied to the same kind of colleges his friends did — no state or safety schools — and didn't get in anywhere.

 

He eventually decided to go to Santa Barbara City College first and then transfer to the University of Southern California, where he hoped to study film. He said it felt like everyone around him was moving forward on a separate, inaccessible track to Ivy Leagues and other top-tier schools.

 

"One of my friends was crushed he didn't get into Stanford, so he went to Berkeley," Dharap recalled. "Here I was with a completely different experience. It was hard."

 

Instead of ending up at USC, he transferred to the University of California, Santa Cruz. Still feeling disengaged from academics, he continued to get bad grades.

 

It wasn't until he figured out what he loved — law and the pursuit of justice — and decided to attend law school at the University of San Francisco that he began to achieve academically. Dharap got his first-ever streak of A's in law school.

 

Now a class-action and personal-injury attorney, Dharap hopes his path shows current students who struggle in school, "You may not be good at school now; it doesn't mean you won't be later." (Another Gunn alum, Nicole Naraji, summed it up: "You don't have to be a kick-ass student to have a kick-ass career.")

 

Dharap's experience also disrupted what he felt was instilled in him at Gunn: that there is only one key — good grades — to one door — college — to future success.

 

"That's what you're told: Your grades are your keys. You get through that door and you have a good job, good college, good life," he said. "But then you realize that there are actually a million different keys to open that door and there are a million different doors."

 

He said he sees failure as an "opportunity to succeed in a different way ... a time to self-correct and to shake things up."

 

Dharap feels so strongly about spreading this message that this year, he started attending Palo Alto Board of Education meetings to express his opposition to reporting weighted grade point averages (GPA) on student transcripts. In his eyes, the debate over weighted grades "perpetuates the idea that there is a single path to success."

 

In a guest opinion piece he penned for the Palo Alto Weekly in May, he reflected on what the debate would have meant to his high school self, who "slunk along" in the shadows of high-achieving friends, "shamefully clutching a 2.6 and hoping that nobody would notice."

 

"What of the 17-year-old me, who would have enthusiastically supported weighted GPA — to his detriment — because he wanted to be just as smart and capable as his peers?" he asked. "The 17-year-old me, to whom AP and honors classes were not 'academic risks' but simply what I was 'supposed' to do. That experience was not unique; it is a common story, untold except in the memories of countless students who have been pressured into conformity by a culture of academic exceptionalism."

 

Dharap is realistic: He knows that when people told him, as a Gunn student, that grades don't matter or that failure is a good thing, the message was nearly impossible to internalize. But he's hopeful that more and more stories like his help to break the mold of success in Palo Alto.

(via @PaloAltoWeekly)

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

PolitiFact's Truth-O-Meter

PolitiFact's Truth-O-Meter | USF in the News | Scoop.it

 

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said judges who have ruled against President Donald Trump’s executive order suspending immigration of nationals from some Muslim-majority nations are "dead wrong" to call the directive a "Muslim ban."

 

The issue is that there is "very little ability" to verify and vet the people coming from the countries listed in Trump’s directive, Kelly said, adding that most of the countries have no passports, no police and no intelligence on its people.

 

"Many of the countries in question don't even have a U.S. embassy there to help us vet," Kelly told Fox News’ Chris Wallace on May 28.

 

Trump’s revised, March 6 order — currently blocked by courts — aimed to temporarily suspend entry of nationals from Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen. 

 

Is it true that there is no U.S. embassy in many of those countries? Information from the State Department shows there isn’t an embassy in at least four of those six.

 

...Having an embassy helps in the vetting process because that's where the State Department can do most of its questioning, said Bill Hing, an immigration expert and law professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law. Though refugees from areas of conflict are also often vetted at U.S. embassies in other countries, Hing said.

 

[via @PolitiFact]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

"When you pull out your gun, the immediate alternative is to use that deadly force,” USF Prof Tony Ribera comments on SF police use of force in SF Chronicle

"When you pull out your gun, the immediate alternative is to use that deadly force,” USF Prof Tony Ribera comments on SF police use of force in SF Chronicle | USF in the News | Scoop.it

San Francisco police officers, who were required in the aftermath of a disputed shooting in the Bayview neighborhood to document every time they point their guns, reported doing so 3,130 times in the first 15 months, or about seven times a day, records show.

 

In nearly half of those cases, the person at whom the officer pointed a gun was African American, though black people make up less than 6 percent of the city’s population.

 

 Police officials say officers are following California law and department policy, which states they may point a firearm when they “believe it may be necessary for the safety of others or for (their) own safety.”

...

Tony Ribera, a former San Francisco police chief who teaches law enforcement leadership at the University of San Francisco, said he recalls pointing a gun four or five times over his 28-year police career.

 

“The reality is, when you pull out your gun, the immediate alternative is to use that deadly force,” he said. “It is a very, very serious thing.”

 

 

[via @sfchronicle]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Jesuit College and University Presidents Join Call for DHS Secretary John Kelly to Protect Immigrant Students

Jesuit College and University Presidents Join Call for DHS Secretary John Kelly to Protect Immigrant Students | USF in the News | Scoop.it

More than 65 presidents of Catholic colleges and universities, as well as the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities, are urging Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly to clarify the Trump administration’s immigration enforcement policies regarding recipients of Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals (DACA).

 

[via @ignatiansolidarity.net]

more...
No comment yet.