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KCBS Radio News: Lack of Diversity in Tech Industry

KCBS Radio News: Lack of Diversity in Tech Industry | USF in the News | Scoop.it

KCBS Radio reports on the Rev. Jesse Jackson's visit to the Hewlett Packard annual shareholders meeting to bring attention to Silicon Valley's poor record of including blacks and Latinos in hiring, board appointments and startup funding.


USF's Vice Provost Mary Wardell-Ghiraraduzzi spoke with KCBS Radio News about Jackson's strategy and why people of color need to be part of the booming tech industry.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Mary J. Wardell-Ghirarduzzi has been working in various roles in higher education administration for the past 18 years and is currently part of leadership at the University of San Francisco. Working with faculty, staff and students, and diverse communities through the San Francisco Bay area, she promotes an understanding of diversity as core to a holistic and sustainable higher education organization. 

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Huffington Post: How Mindfulness Can Defeat Racial Bias

Huffington Post: How Mindfulness Can Defeat Racial Bias | USF in the News | Scoop.it

When I was promoted to tenured full professor, the dean of my law school kindly had flowers sent to me at my home in Pacific Heights, an overpriced San Francisco neighborhood almost devoid of black residents. I opened the door to find a tall, young, African-American deliveryman who announced, “Delivery for Professor Magee.” I, a petite black woman, dressed for a simple Saturday spent in my own home, reached for the flowers saying, “I am Professor Magee.”
 

The deliveryman looked down at the order and back up at me. Apparently shaken from the hidden ground of his preconceptions, he looked at me again. Incredulous, he asked, “Are you sure?”

[via @huffingtonpost]

...

We are each reminded almost daily of the way that race intersects with judgment in our daily lives, leading to bad decisions and over-reactions—which in the context of criminal justice can have deadly consequences. As the story of my encounter with the black deliveryman indicates, none of us is immune: Black people may be as conditioned as anyone else by stereotypes and unconscious expectations. 
 

Is there a solution? Research shows that mindfulness practices help us focus, give us greater control over our emotions, and increase our capacity to think clearly and act with purpose. Might mindfulness assist police and other public servants in minimizing the mistaken judgments that lead to such harms? Might they help the rest of us—professors and deliverymen alike—minimize our biases as well?


Rhonda V. Magee, J.D., M.A. (Sociology), is Professor of Law at the University of San Francisco and a Visiting Scholar at the Berkeley Center for the Study of Law and Society. Her work-in-progress, The Way of ColorInsight: Understanding Race in Our Lives Through Mindfulness-Based ColorInsight, will be submitted for publication this year. She has previously written about the “flower deliveryman incident” using her full name at the time, Rhonda V. Magee Andrews.

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Metro US: Barnard likely to usher in transgender women

Metro US: Barnard likely to usher in transgender women | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Barnard College is considering a new policy to officially make transgender women eligible for admission, following the lead of many other women’s colleges around the country and at a time when transgender women and men are increasingly in the media spotlight.
 

Over the last six months, Barnard has held a series of town hall style meetings for students, alumnae and faculty to debate the possibility of introducing a policy dealing with admissions for transgender women.
 

Caleb LoSchiavo, graduating this year with a major in psychology, applied to Barnard when they still identified as a woman. Since starting college, they came out as transgender and have since transitioned. They now identify as genderqueer, meaning not fitting strictly into the definition of male or female identity. [via @metro_us]

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Professor Richard Johnson III studies LGBT issues at the University of San Francisco and has been keenly following the transgender policies unfolding around the country. He agrees that the momentum is at a point where Barnard is likely feeling the pressure to make a decision.
 

“I think honestly so many of them [the colleges] are late to the game,” said Johnson.
 

“You know I believe the matter of trans women has been on the docket of many colleges for the last several years. Perhaps because of the social context of schools such as Barnard some of them might have considered this a touchy issue, however you can't stop progress,” he said.

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Union Leader: Cellphone tracking - Require a warrant

Union Leader: Cellphone tracking - Require a warrant | USF in the News | Scoop.it

If the government can track your movements via your mobile phone, it can do more than know where you are at any given time. It can create a detailed personal profile capable of predicting your future movements. And yet we still do not require a warrant before the government can track you via an electronic device.

Thursday, the state Senate is to consider a bill that would write that warrant requirement into law. It is a must-pass bill.

How much information can a government agency obtain by tracking you via your phone or other electronic device?

“When the government has a record of everywhere we’ve gone on a continuous basis over a period of time, they know our religious beliefs, our health information, our associations, our political views, our most private activities,” Susan Freiwald, a law professor at the University of San Francisco, told National Journal earlier this month. [via @UnionLeader]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Professor Susan Freiwald publishes and presents widely in the areas of cyberlaw and information privacy. A former software developer, Freiwald has authored and co-authored amicus briefs in major cases involving electronic surveillance laws. She also regularly assists the Electronic Frontier Foundation with electronic surveillance litigation efforts and has served on the board of the Northern California American Civil Liberties Union.


Education

  • BA, Harvard University
  • JD, Harvard University
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Inside Higher Ed: U of San Francisco gives gaokao-based admissions a try in China

Inside Higher Ed: U of San Francisco gives gaokao-based admissions a try in China | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Chinese applicants to the University of San Francisco need not submit a transcript or an SAT score under a newly announced pilot program. Rather, the private Jesuit institution plans to admit students based on their scores on the grueling, multiday Chinese university entrance exam, the gaokao, and their performance in an in-person interview in Beijing.
 

Students admitted through this pathway will not be required to submit standardized English language test results, although USF plans to administer its own English language test during the interview, according to Stanley D. Nel, the university’s vice president for international relations.
 

Nel said his goal is not to flood the University of San Francisco with additional Chinese students -- USF enrolled more than 1,000 students from China last fall, including 846 undergraduates -- but rather to identify 5 to 10 top students who do well on the gaokao but not well enough to get into the Chinese university of their choice (the gaokao is far more central to admissions decisions in China than the SAT or ACT generally is in the U.S.).
[via @insidehighered]

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San Francisco Chronicle: I-280 teardown could lead to billion-dollar land rush

San Francisco Chronicle: I-280 teardown could lead to billion-dollar land rush | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Demo derby: Tuesday’s special — and special-interest-fueled — election for the state Senate in the the East Bay between Orinda Mayor Steve Glazer and state Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla has turned into a head-on collision between the business and labor sides of the Democratic Party.
 

And in an interesting twist, Republican voters, who are in the minority, could be the deciders.
 

“It’s the only show in town, and everyone is paying attention,” said Corey Cook, political science professor at the University of San Francisco.
 

Labor Democrats backing Bonilla are incensed that Glazer is getting help from independent expenditure committees funded by Republicans outside the district — but the fact is, both sides are courting the GOP vote. [vika @sfchronicle]



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New York Times: The Right Baits the Left to Turn Against Hillary Clinton

New York Times: The Right Baits the Left to Turn Against Hillary Clinton | USF in the News | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — A Twitter post recently caught the eye of Bill McKibben, the environmental advocate and godfather of the Keystone XL pipeline protests. It included an image from “The Simpsons” showing Homer and his family basking in mountains of cash in their living room, followed by a report on Hillary Rodham Clinton’s appearing at a fund-raiser with a lobbyist from the Keystone fight.
 

Mr. McKibben’s environmental organization, 350.org, has been trying to raise awareness about the ties it sees between lobbyists for the oil pipeline and former aides to Mrs. Clinton. He promptly shared the post with his 150,000 Twitter followers, and the reaction was immediate. [via @nytimes]

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The new-style digital campaign captures some basic facts about 21st-century communication: Information travels at warp speed on social media, it is sometimes difficult to know where that information comes from, and most people like to read things with which they agree. The result, said Ken Goldstein, a professor of politics at the University of San Francisco who specializes in political advertising, is something more sophisticated.
 

“Politics is usually basic math,” he said, “and this is a little bit of calculus, thinking a couple steps ahead.”

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San Francisco Business Times: Former USF president, who rebuilt finances, blocked basketball, dies

San Francisco Business Times: Former USF president, who rebuilt finances, blocked basketball, dies | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Rev. John Lo Schiavo, a San Francisco native who led the University of San Francisco back from financial despair and suspended basketball program after a series of recruiting violations, died Friday at the infirmary of Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos, USF said.
 

He was 90. 

When elected as USF's 25th president in 1977, the iconic San Francisco university had a $1.7 million deficit and an endowment of only $4.6 million. Lo Schiavo, who began his career at USF as a philosophy instructor in 1950, launched a capital campaign that brought in close to $27 million by 1982 — then USF's largest fundraising program. The effort allowed USF to buy the Lone Mountain College property a block away in the North of the Panhandle neighborhood as well as add a wing to the School of Law's Kendrick Hall.

University of San Francisco's insight:
Fr. Lo Schiavo, who presided over a financial, academic, and co-curricular resurgence of the university, died peacefully on Friday, May 15, 2015 in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. 
Funeral Information
A Vigil Service will be held Monday, May 25 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church on the campus of the University of San Francisco at 650 Parker Avenue, San Francisco, 94118. 

A Requiem Mass (funeral) will be held at St. Ignatius on Tuesday, May 26 at 11 a.m., with a reception following. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/john-lo-schiavo/
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Los Angeles Times: John Lo Schiavo dies at 90; USF president terminated basketball program

Los Angeles Times: John Lo Schiavo dies at 90; USF president terminated basketball program | USF in the News | Scoop.it

When Queen Elizabeth II stopped in San Francisco on a U.S. tour in 1983, a tall, affable Jesuit priest stood in the receiving line to greet her at a formal event.


Father John Lo Schiavo, then president of the University of San Francisco, told the queen that he was honored to meet her. The queen, hearing his name, beckoned him closer so she could ask him a little something in private: "When are you going to bring back basketball?" whispered her majesty, head of the Commonwealth and defender of the faith.


Lo Schiavo (pronounced lo-skee-avo) had made global headlines by pulling the plug on his school's celebrated basketball program after the NCAA and several publications had found repeated ethical violations. [via @latimes]

University of San Francisco's insight:
Fr. Lo Schiavo, who presided over a financial, academic, and co-curricular resurgence of the university, died peacefully on Friday, May 15, 2015 in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. 

Funeral Information
A Vigil Service will be held Monday, May 25 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church on the campus of the University of San Francisco at 650 Parker Avenue, San Francisco, 94118. A Requiem Mass (funeral) will be held at St. Ignatius on Tuesday, May 26 at 11 a.m., with a reception following. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/john-lo-schiavo/
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Eventbrite Co-Founder & President Julia Hartz to Speak at USF’s Annual Women’s Leadership & Philanthropy Luncheon, May 15

Eventbrite Co-Founder & President Julia Hartz to Speak at USF’s Annual Women’s Leadership & Philanthropy Luncheon, May 15 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The University of San Francisco’s (USF) Women in Leadership & Philanthropy initiative is pleased to host Julia Hartz, co-founder and president of Eventbrite, the global ticketing and events marketplace, at USF’s second annual Women’s Leadership Luncheon on May 15 at the Four Seasons Hotel in San Francisco. Hartz will share her personal and professional journey as a technology entrepreneur, business executive, angel investor, partner, wife and mother.

 

By providing educational, networking, and leadership opportunities through USF, the mission of Women in Leadership & Philanthropy is to inspire, empower, and advance women to become transformative leaders in service of their communities and beyond.

 

“I’m thrilled to share the story of my journey in building Eventbrite, and what I’ve learned along the way as a working mother and entrepreneur,” said Julia Hartz, co-founder and president of Eventbrite.


For more information, please visit https://www.usfca.edu/Giving/women/

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New Books in Buddhist Studies: John K. Nelson - "Experimental Buddhism"

New Books in Buddhist Studies: John K. Nelson - "Experimental Buddhism" | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In his recent book, Experimental Buddhism: Innovation and Activism in Contemporary Japan (University of Hawaii Press, 2013), John K. Nelson delves into the historical circumstances that have led to the declining fortunes of Japanese Buddhism and explores recent and ongoing attempts by Japanese Buddhist clerics to render Buddhism relevant to Japanese society once again. Based on extensive fieldwork, interviews, and the author's own participation in some of the innovative programs featured in the book, Experimental Buddhismfeatures forty-five temples and some of the experiments that they are undertaking. Shingon monks chanting in a jazz club in Tokyo, a female cabaret dance troupe performing in front of the massive seated Buddha of the twelve-and-a-half-century-old Tōdaiji, a priest-run counseling center located in a covered shopping arcade, and a suicide prevention group run by priests are but a few of the fascinating examples that Nelson identifies as a part of a new trend within Japanese Buddhism, albeit a minor one as of yet. [via @UHPRessNews]

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Experimental Buddhism shared the 2014 Toshihide Numata Book Prize for "outstanding book in Buddhist Studies," a prize administered by the Center for Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. John Nelson is Professor in Theology and Religious Studies at the University of San Francisco.

University of San Francisco's insight:

John Nelson is Professor of East Asian religions in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies, University of San Francisco. He is the author of Experimental Buddhism: Innovation and Activism in Contemporary Japan (2013, University of Hawaii), two books on Shinto in contemporary Japan (A Year in the Life of a Shinto Shrine [1996], and Enduring Identities: the Guise of Shinto in Contemporary Japan [2000], numerous articles, and has produced two short documentary videos, "Spirits of the State: Japan's Yasukuni Shrine" (2005) and "Japan's Rituals of Remembrance: 50 Years after the Pacific War" (1997). He co-edited the reference volume titled Handbook of Contemporary Japanese Religions(Brill, 2012).


As a cultural anthropologist, Nelson's research and publications explore the interaction between religion and politics in East Asia, with a current emphasis on global dynamics and rapid social change.  He is also interested in transnationalism, constructions of gender and cultural identity, social memory, and sites designated as "sacred."  


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WIRED: Court's Reversal Leaves Phones Open to Warrantless Tracking

WIRED: Court's Reversal Leaves Phones Open to Warrantless Tracking | USF in the News | Scoop.it

A US CIRCUIT court has handed privacy advocates a surprising reversal on a landmark pro-privacy decision: Last year, the court ruled against the government in the case of Quartavious Davis, whose cell phone was tracked by cops as he went on a three-month robbery spree. Privacy advocates celebrated that result as a new anti-snooping legal precedent. But now prosecutors could use the same court’s opposite finding to instead justify warrantless snooping on your cellphone’s location. 
 

In a decision published Tuesday, a panel of 11th circuit judges overturned the ruling the same circuit court made last year in US vs. Davis, which found that obtaining Davis’ past cellphone location without a warrant violated his fourth amendment right to privacy. The new ruling instead finds that because Davis’ phone location data wasn’t Davis’s property, but the property of his phone carrier, MetroPCS—a legal argument known as the “third party doctrine”—he had no expectation of that data’s privacy, and the cops tracking him didn’t in fact need a warrant.


“It’s a huge setback as compared to the decision it vacated,” says Susan Freiwald, a privacy-focused University of San Francisco Law School professor. “These decisions only come out every couple of years. And in that sense it’s very disappointing.” [via @WIRED]

...

Even so, the Davis ruling shouldn’t be read as justifying cell phone location tracking so much as delaying the resolution of the question, says University of San Francisco law professor Freiwald. She points out that the court was careful to narrow its ruling.


That means the panel’s ruling about an older type of phone doesn’t actually open up modern smartphones to the same sort of location surveillance, Freiwald says.

At the same time, she admits that lower courts may misinterpret it to leave smartphone users vulnerable to that sort of more precise tracking. “It’s a decision that looks backward rather than forward…It applies to the kind of monitoring that was going on five years ago,” she argues. “In the mean time, all the lower courts are quite likely to read it more broadly than its actual terms, and the government will argue that it covers more than it really does.”

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CBS Local: Assistant Dean Says Healthcare Students Have Endless Opportunities

CBS Local: Assistant Dean Says Healthcare Students Have Endless Opportunities | USF in the News | Scoop.it

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the healthcare industry is one of the largest industries in the country, with nearly 22 million jobs projected for 2022. That’s great news for San Francisco students hoping to find gainful employment in the healthcare sector upon graduation. While healthcare does experience occasional economic plunges, Enna Trevathan, D.N.P.of the University of San Francisco says it is one of the most stable job sectors in the American workforce. [via @cbslocal]

...

 

What career advice can you share to students interested in healthcare?

“Although health care does suffer occasional economic plunges, it has proven to be one of the most stable job sectors in the workforce. Since entering the healthcare labor market, I have never faced layoffs, although there were some close calls. The healthcare field is so dynamic and versatile that I am able to retool myself whenever the need arises to improve my marketability and remain employed. My career advice to students interested in healthcare is to find a vocation within the arena and get started. It may be more practical to start as a nursing assistant, registered nurse, x-ray technician, respiratory or physical therapist, but the opportunities are endless.”


University of San Francisco's insight:

Dr. Trevathan has over 30 years of experience in the healthcare arena stemming from insurance underwriter to nurse manager to educator. In addition to being a nursing administrator, her demonstrated passion for the Clinical Nurse Leader’s role in positively impacting the delivery of patient care has aided the growth of the Online MSN program. Her primary educational focus is Leadership. Publications include a journal article in 2010, The Clinical Nurse Leader: A Catalyst in Community Healthcare Transformation-Nurse Leader.
 

Today, Dr. Trevathan is developing the Educational Outreach team for the USF School of Nursing and Health Professions (SONHP). As Assistant Dean, her portfolio includes oversight for SONHP online programs and blended courses across departments. She serves as school liaison to the branch campuses and works with faculty and programs as they develop new degree options. Dr. Trevathan manages the new SONHP certificate programs that are emerging as well as the school’s transition-to-practice programs; she is also spearheading the school’s inter-professional core-course module development. Dr. Trevathan is committed to upholding the curricular quality and integrity of USF and the Jesuit tradition.

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San Jose Mercury News: NBA playoffs - How rabid Warriors fan loyalty developed

San Jose Mercury News: NBA playoffs - How rabid Warriors fan loyalty developed | USF in the News | Scoop.it

OAKLAND -- Stephen Curry flicked the pass behind his back, Leandro Barbosa drained a 3-pointer and Oracle Arena roared to life.

As the Warriors rolled toward one of their franchise-record 67 victories in typically dazzling fashion, longtime team executive Al Attles leaned against a wall halfway up the arena.


"It wasn't always like this," Attles said, pausing to soak in the late-season bedlam. "I remember when the arena was half full." [via @mercnews]

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"The size of the population and the income level is strong enough that when the Warriors aren't very good, there's demand, and when they are good, there is huge excess demand," said Dan Rascher, a professor of sport management at the University of San Francisco.


"This area is a gold mine."


"The core of the fan base is loyal, then you add something like 'We Believe' and it goes up a notch," [Andy] Dolich said.

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San Francisco Chronicle: RBI uses baseball to lure schoolkids to reading

San Francisco Chronicle: RBI uses baseball to lure schoolkids to reading | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Harnessing kids’ passion for baseball in order to encourage their passion for reading is the aim of San Francisco RBI. The RBI program, nurtured here by Jim Messemer — in conjunction with Major League Baseball, with cooperation from the San Francisco Unified School District, and the help of volunteers and tutors from the University of San Francisco — uses ballplayers as role models and spokespeople. Giants pitchers-pals-mensches Matt Cain and Jeremy Affeldt were the star power at Monday night’s fundraising dinner, which, having doubled in size from last year’s event, raised a million bucks.


“If you see people of poverty and you have the ability to help alleviate it,” said Affeldt in an onstage discussion with Cain, “if you don’t do it, you’re not successful.” Jessica Aguirre of NBC Bay Area News ably moderated the conversation, which moved back and forth between the inspirational (“At the end of your career, it’s the respect of your teammates that’s going to be cherished,” said Cain) and the comedic (“One ring at a time” is how Affeldt said he puts on his World Series bling). [via @sfchronicle]

University of San Francisco's insight:

University of San Francisco President Paul J. Fitzgerald, S.J. serves on the board of San Francisco RBI: http://sfrbi.org/about/board-of-directors/

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New York Times: Rev. John Lo Schiavo Dies at 90; University President Barred Basketball

New York Times: Rev. John Lo Schiavo Dies at 90; University President Barred Basketball | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Rev. John Lo Schiavo, who spent 14 years as president of the University of San Francisco, notably making headlines when he took the rare step of suspending the men’s basketball program after repeated violations of National Collegiate Athletic Association rules, died on Friday in Los Gatos, Calif. He was 90.
 

The death was confirmed in an email by a spokeswoman for the university, Anne-Marie Devine Tasto, who said Father Lo Schiavo had dementia.
 

Father Lo Schiavo, a San Francisco native, was affiliated with the university, a Jesuit school, almost continuously for more than 60 years. He started as a philosophy instructor in 1950 and was later dean of students, vice president for student affairs, chairman of the board of trustees and rector of the university Jesuit community. A popular campus figure who was known as Father Lo, he was president from 1977 to 1991.
 

Nationally, Father Lo Schiavo is best known for his decision in 1982 to forgo the revenue, publicity and acclaim of the university’s successful men’s basketball program and instead stand up for institutional rectitude. His suspension of the program indefinitely was considered the first time a university had shut down a major sports program, without external pressure to do so, because of N.C.A.A. rules violations, some of which preceded his tenure.

University of San Francisco's insight:
Fr. Lo Schiavo, who presided over a financial, academic, and co-curricular resurgence of the university, died peacefully on Friday, May 15, 2015 in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. 
Funeral Information
A Vigil Service will be held Monday, May 25 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church on the campus of the University of San Francisco at 650 Parker Avenue, San Francisco, 94118. 

A Requiem Mass (funeral) will be held at St. Ignatius on Tuesday, May 26 at 11 a.m., with a reception following. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/john-lo-schiavo/
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Catholic San Francisco: USF mourns former president Jesuit Father John Lo Schiavo

Catholic San Francisco: USF mourns former president Jesuit Father John Lo Schiavo | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Former University of San Francisco president, Jesuit Father John Lo Schiavo, died May 15 at his community’s Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. The priest was 90 years old and entered the Society of Jesus in 1942.

Father Lo Schiavo was born in San Francisco and graduated from Star of the Sea School and the Jesuits’ St. Ignatius College Preparatory. He held undergraduate and graduate degrees in philosophy from the Jesuits’ Gonzaga University.

Father Lo Schiavo had a 65-year relationship with USF that began in 1950 as an instructor of philosophy. He later would serve in roles including dean of students and vice president of student affairs before being named the school’s 25th president in 1977. He served in the post until 1991.

During his administration, USF added a wing to the law school’s Kendrick Hall and purchased the Lone Mountain College property, now home to the Jesuits’ Loyola House, and was pivotal in funds raised for USF’s Koret Health and Recreation Center in 1989.

University of San Francisco's insight:
Fr. Lo Schiavo, who presided over a financial, academic, and co-curricular resurgence of the university, died peacefully on Friday, May 15, 2015 in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. 
Funeral Information
A Vigil Service will be held Monday, May 25 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church on the campus of the University of San Francisco at 650 Parker Avenue, San Francisco, 94118. 

A Requiem Mass (funeral) will be held at St. Ignatius on Tuesday, May 26 at 11 a.m., with a reception following. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/john-lo-schiavo/
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Scientific American: Gerard Kuiper's Daring Rescue of Max Planck at the End of World War II

Scientific American: Gerard Kuiper's Daring Rescue of Max Planck at the End of World War II | USF in the News | Scoop.it

In May of 1945, the American astronomer turned soldier Gerard Kuiper stood in the remnants of Nazi Germany. His keen eyes, normally trained on the heavens, looked across the Elbe River to the east. Germany had just surrendered, but the region was not yet at peace. Enemy soldiers and homeless refugees wandered lawlessly through rubble, seeking food. Meanwhile, sweeping from the east, the Red Army eagerly claimed its new lands. Kuiper had survived the war and completed top-secret assignments. So why would he volunteer for one last dangerous mission?

[via @sciam]

...

Brandon R. Brown is a Professor of Physics at the University of San Francisco. His research work has included measurements of vortex dynamics in high-temperature superconductors and biophysics studies of the electric sense in elasmobranchs. He is the author of Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken by War. His writing for general audiences has appeared in New Scientist, SEED, the Huffington Post, and other outlets. Follow on Twitter @TheDailyPlanck

University of San Francisco's insight:

Brandon Brown pursued doctoral training in superconductivity and low-temperature physics, with postdoctoral work in science communication. Once at the University of San Francisco, he shifted his research focus to sensory biophysics. His laboratory, his research students, and various collaborators have explored the electric and magnetic sensory abilities of a variety of creatures. Currently, he is completing a book about the life and work of German physicist Max Planck (1858-1947), to be published by Oxford University Press in 2015.  See his author page for more information.

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San Francisco Chronicle: John Lo Schiavo, former president who helped USF rebound, dies

San Francisco Chronicle: John Lo Schiavo, former president who helped USF rebound, dies | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Rev. John Lo Schiavo, former president and chancellor of the University of San Francisco, who presided over a financial and academic resurgence of the university — as well as a controversial shutdown of its basketball program over recruiting violations — died peacefully at age 90 at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos on Friday.
 

Born to Italian immigrants in 1925, the Rev. Lo Schiavo was very much a local kid, attending Star of the Sea Grammar School and St. Ignatius High School before joining the Society of Jesus in 1942, said his cousin, Gina Asaro Busalacchi, who remained close with him through his last years.
 

“He had a lot of charisma and compassion,” said Busalacchi, 61. “He had a twinkle in his eye, his smile was warm and friendly, and he went to bat for the people he loved.” [via @sfchronicle]

University of San Francisco's insight:
Fr. Lo Schiavo, who presided over a financial, academic, and co-curricular resurgence of the university, died peacefully on Friday, May 15, 2015 in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. 
Funeral Information
A Vigil Service will be held Monday, May 25 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church on the campus of the University of San Francisco at 650 Parker Avenue, San Francisco, 94118. 

A Requiem Mass (funeral) will be held at St. Ignatius on Tuesday, May 26 at 11 a.m., with a reception following. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/john-lo-schiavo/
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Associated Press: Former University of San Francisco President Dies at 90

Associated Press: Former University of San Francisco President Dies at 90 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The Rev. John Lo Schiavo, former president of the University of San Francisco who presided over the university's resurgence and a shutdown of its basketball program, died Friday. He was 90.
 

Lo Schiavo died in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos, said University of San Francisco spokeswoman Anne-Marie Devine Tasto.
 

A San Francisco native, Lo Schiavo was born in 1925 to Italian immigrants. He graduated from Star of the Sea Grammar School and St. Ignatius High School and joined the Society of Jesus in 1942.
 

His 65-year association with USF began in 1950, when he became an instructor of philosophy. He began a 14-year presidency in 1977.
 

One of his main achievements at USF was getting the university out of debt and significantly growing its endowment from $4.6 million in 1976 to $38.7 million in 1991. [via @AP]

University of San Francisco's insight:
Fr. Lo Schiavo, who presided over a financial, academic, and co-curricular resurgence of the university, died peacefully on Friday, May 15, 2015 in the infirmary at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos. 
Funeral Information
A Vigil Service will be held Monday, May 25 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church on the campus of the University of San Francisco at 650 Parker Avenue, San Francisco, 94118. 

A Requiem Mass (funeral) will be held at St. Ignatius on Tuesday, May 26 at 11 a.m., with a reception following. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/john-lo-schiavo/
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Contra Costa Times: In Senate battle, Republicans could play kingmaker

Contra Costa Times: In Senate battle, Republicans could play kingmaker | USF in the News | Scoop.it

WALNUT CREEK -- Steve Glazer's left-leaning detractors say he isn't a real Democrat. If enough Republican voters agree, they might just catapult the Orinda mayor into the state Senate next week.
 

In the era of single-party runoff elections, no Democrat has tried harder to court Republican voters than Glazer, a self-described social liberal and fiscal conservative who is running against Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla, a strongly pro-union Democrat from Concord.
 

Over the past three years, Glazer, a political strategist who ran Jerry Brown's 2010 gubernatorial campaign, has helped the Chamber of Commerce unseat pro-labor Democratic legislators, called for banning BART strikes and backed Assemblywoman Catharine Baker, R-Dublin, in her runoff election against a Democratic opponent. [via @CCTimes]

...

"The Republican bloc has held fairly strong, and that can only be favorable for Glazer," said Corey Cook, associate professor of politics and director of the Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good at the University of San Francisco.
 

Typically, half of so-called "orphan voters" leave their ballot blank when no member of their party is represented, Cook said. And when they do vote, they often fail to distinguish which candidate from an opposing party better reflects their political views.
 

That likely won't be the case in next week's Senate race, Cook said, because of the attention it's getting, the lack of any other contests to distract voters and Glazer's extra incentive to appeal to Republicans.
 

Cook said voters from both parties could wind up split to a certain extent.
 

"Glazer will have a measurable advantage among Republicans," she said. "The question is whether it's enough to tip the election."

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KPIX-TV CBS 5: USF Sport Management Professor Michael Goldman comments on Tom Brady Suspension

Michael Goldman is an Assistant Professor in the Sport Management Program at the University of San Francisco. He teaches Sport Marketing and Business Develop...
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Wallet Hub: 2015’s Best & Worst States for Nurses

Wallet Hub: 2015’s Best & Worst States for Nurses | USF in the News | Scoop.it

The nursing industry – like most segments of the economy – is in a state of significant transition under the weight of major overarching socioeconomic dynamics, from the aging U.S. population and the Affordable Care Act to the student loan crisis and concerns about the future of key entitlement programs. It’s therefore understandable if recent nursing school grads aren’t sure where to turn once they receive their diploma. [via @WalletHub]

...

WalletHub turned to a panel of esteemed nursing industry experts for insight into the future of the profession and how recent entrants into the market can navigate their way to a successful career. You can check out their bios and thoughts below.

  1. What are the biggest issues facing nurses today?
  2. What is the long-term outlook for the field of nursing?
  3. What tips do you have for recent nursing school grads looking for a place to live and work?
  4. What can local governments and health systems do to attract and retain high quality nurses?
  5. What is the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on nurses? 
  6. Are unions beneficial to nurses?

Candace Campbell

Assistant Professor at University of San Francisco, School of Nursing and Health Professions


University of San Francisco's insight:
Candace Campbell, DNP, RN, CNL

Education
DNP, University of San Francisco 
MSN-HCSM, Loyola New Orleans
BSN, Loyola New Orleans
AARN, El Camino College
BA, Speech Communication/Theatre, University of Puget Sound


Research Areas
Interprofessional healthcare communication using Applied Improvisational Exercises

Micropremature birth and psychosocial repercussions on the family 
PTSD in medical personnel veterans of Vietnam War
Elective Cesarean Delivery 
Healthcare Public Policy and Nursing Advocacy
Florence Nightingale and History of the Nursing Profession

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KTVU Fox 2: Bay Area Republicans react to newest GOP candidates

KTVU Fox 2: Bay Area Republicans react to newest GOP candidates | USF in the News | Scoop.it

SAN FRANCISCO (KTVU-AP) -- Bay Area Republicans shared their thoughts Monday night about Carly Fiorina and Ben Carson joining the increasingly diverse field of candidates hoping to win the GOP Presidential nomination.

At an event in North Beach Monday evening, Nob Hill Republican Women's Club President Joan Leone said she's excited by the five GOP candidates so far.

Fiorina and Carson both begin campaigns as longshots in a race that includes Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and some seasoned politicians expected to run such as former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker. [via @KTVU]

...

"Most of these people know they can't win, they have no chance of winning, They can't raise the money that will be required to raise, but they are committed to certain issues," said James Taylor, a professor of politics at University of San Francisco.

'They're positioning themselves to be party brokers, power brokers to be considered for the vice-presidential candidacy, for other high appointments if the Republican nominee became president," Taylor told KTVU. 

University of San Francisco's insight:

James Lance Taylor is author of the book Black Nationalism in the United States: From Malcolm X to Barack Obama, which earned 2011 "Outstanding Academic Title" -Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries (January 2012). (Ranked top 3 percent of 25,000 books submitted and top 8 percent of 7,300 actually accepted for review by the American Library Association). He is the Immediate Past President of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS), an important organization of African American, African, and Afro Caribbean political scientists in the United States.


He is associate professor and Chair of the Department of Politics at the University of San Francisco. His undergraduate degree is from Pepperdine University and his graduate degrees were earned at the University of Southern California (USC). He has taught previously as a Visiting Associate Professor of political science at Saint Louis University in Madrid, Spain and political science and African American Studies at University of California, Berkeley.

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CNBC: Venture capitalist confidence dips in Q1

CNBC: Venture capitalist confidence dips in Q1 | USF in the News | Scoop.it

Silicon Valley venture capitalists' confidence declined slightly in the first quarter of 2015, according to the Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index. From 3.93 last quarter, the overall confidence has slumped to 3.81 out of 5, which is still higher than the 11-year average of 3.72, according to the report released Tuesday. 
 

The main reasons for the dip are increasing concerns about overvaluation in some venture-backed firms, along with the growth in alternative financing sources. 
 

For perspective, Q1 2015 had the highest level of venture funding in 15 years. [via @CNBC]

...

The research, compiled by University of San Francisco professor Mark Cannice, surveys 33 venture capitalists in San Francisco Bay Area/Silicon Valley. 
 

The Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index measures and reports the opinions of professional venture capitalists on their estimations of the high-growth venture entrepreneurial environment in the San Francisco Bay Area over the next six to 18 months.

University of San Francisco's insight:

Mark V. Cannice, Ph.D. is an internationally recognized scholar, teacher, and speaker on entrepreneurship and venture capital. He is Department Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation with the University of San Francisco School of Management.

Dr. Cannice writes the widely-followed quarterly Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Confidence Index Report® which is published by ProQuest and EBSCO, carried globally on Bloomberg Professional Services in 125 countries (Bloomberg ticker symbol: SVVCCI), and has been referenced in the Economist, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Xinhua News Service, Der Speigel, CNBC, National Public Radio, and many other media. He has written similar quarterly reports on the Chinese venture capital industry, China Venture Capitalist Confidence Index Report™(Bloomberg ticker symbol: CVCCI).

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CNBC: The money behind the most expensive boxing fight in history

CNBC: The money behind the most expensive boxing fight in history | USF in the News | Scoop.it

CNBC Africa is joined by Dr. Michael Goldman, Assistant Professor, Sport Management Program at the University of San Francisco to discuss the money behind what is considered the most expensive boxing fight in history and how it compares to the super bowl.

[via @CNBCAfrica]

University of San Francisco's insight:

Michael Goldman is an Assistant Professor in the Sport Management Program at the University of San Francisco. He teaches Sport Marketing and Business Development & Sales on both campuses. Through his teaching, research and consulting activities in the business of sport, Michael has worked with leading soccer, rugby, and cricket sponsors, rights-holders, broadcasters and agencies in South Africa and Kenya.As a Senior Lecturer in Marketing at the University of Pretoria's Gordon Institute of Business Science since 2005, Michael designed, delivered and assessed post-graduate management courses on a number of academic and executive programmes, to managers from a wide range of companies, including PepsiCo, SABMiller Africa & Asia, Nokia Africa, Barclays, and Sasol.He is a regular media contributor on sport marketing issues and has published academically in the US, Europe and Africa.

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